How To Cycle Faster For Free – Ride Your Bike Faster With Less Effort

How To Cycle Faster For Free – Ride Your Bike Faster With Less Effort


We all know that slipstreaming behind other
riders is the most effective way of going faster with less effort. However, it takes
a rider with some pretty thick skin to withstand the kind of abuse that you might get if you
sit in all day. There are however some very useful tricks that you can employ where you
can manipulate a group to your advantage. If you can, try to time your effort on the
front of the group to when you’re riding uphill. Because I’m going a lot slower, I’m wasting
a lot less energy by battling into a wind. Also the guys behind me are going to be putting
out a similar amount of effort to me due to the gradient of the road. As a side benefit,
I also get to control the pace, which means I don’t actually have to over-exert myself
by trying to hang on to peoples wheels. What it means is when I get to the top of the climb,
I can pull over knowing I’ve spent my time on the front, and then I can sit in and have
a rest. If you live in a flat area though, it can
also be employed in a similar manner. If you sit on into a headwind, but then in tailwind
sections where you’re having to put in less effort, you can sit on the front. Aerodynamics plays a crucial role in cycling
at speeds of over 20km per hour, and exponentially more so the faster you’re riding. I’m currently
in the most un-aerodynamic position that I can get on this bike: arms straight, torso
upright on the hoods and tops of the bike. But the first thing you should remember is to get
your torso flat. You can do that by putting your hands on the drops, bending your elbows,
or even on the hoods – in my case that also gets my arms straight and out of the wind.
Next, think about your head. If you can get that down in line with your body but still
remain able to look forward, this is now the most aerodynamic position that I can get on
this bike. It’s also a reason why lycra is so tight-fitting on pro cyclists – because
clothing is is also playing a huge factor in the role of aerodynamics. Even having your
jersey unzipped and flapping about will make quite a few watts difference, so the tighter
fitting you can get, the better. Also bear in mind that big rain jackets really take
the power out of you, so bear that in mind before you put one on when it’s raining. While you’ve got the wind in your face or
directly behind you, or even no wind at all, the most beneficial place to sit is directly
behind the rider in front of you. But once you start getting wind from the side, things
get a little bit more complicated. At the moment we’ve got the wind coming from my right-hand
side, so the most beneficial place to sit, as Simon is here, he’s just slightly behind
and to the left, with Tom behind Simon. How much you sit to the left will depend on how
strong the wind is, and you can only really decide that on feel. You should be able to
go to the side of somebody and get that sweetspot – that’s something that you’ll learn over
time.