How To Climb On A Triathlon Bike Like A Pro

How To Climb On A Triathlon Bike Like A Pro


(computer noises`) This super aero triathlon bike is built for speed on the flat. But at some point, you will have to climb
on it during a race. Now, the geometry is very
different on a bike like this compared to a road bike,
with position further forward with our weight over the front end. Plus, their bikes are
generally a little bit heavier, so it can make climbing quite hard work. So how can we make climbing
on a triathlon bike a little bit easier? (music with a beat) Firstly, let’s take a look at the main differences on a triathlon bike. Most triathlon bikes will have a cockpit with a flat based bar like these. Now these often be a lot lower than your road bike kind of bars. And then of course we’ve got the size of the frame and wheels, which makes the bike heavier, but also makes it harder to manoeuvre, especially when you’re
getting up out of the saddle. (music with a beat) So on to the climbing and to be honest, not a whole deal should change. You’re still riding a bike up a climb, so a lot of it just
comes down to confidence and being comfortable on the bike itself. Now my positions a lot
further forward on this bike, so as I’m climbing, I’m
just pushing myself back into the saddle a little bit more. And the common mistake is to tense up in your arms and shoulders,
due to the base bar being that little bit lower,
but it’s really important to stay relaxed, to conserve energy, and so that you can freely move
the bike underneath you. (music with a beat) Whether you ride in or out of the saddle is really up to you and at times, the terrain will make
that decision for you. Riding out of the saddle
will allow you to apply more force to the peddles
by using your body weight. Now it does use a little more energy, but it may be necessary
to get you over the climb. Just before you get out of the saddle, you may want to consider
changing up one gear so that you’re not spinning out. Now when you’re out of the saddle, there’s a lot of torque
going through the chain. So if you do need to change gear again, you may want to sit back down momentarily so that you can softly
shift through the gears. When you get out of the saddle, there’s nothing wrong with swaying the bike from side to side. In fact, I do this quite a lot. It actually allows you to
use your body weight more by almost stepping in to the pedals. And don’t forget that you
want to pace your effort on the climbs. It can be very easy to
ride a little too hard due to the increased weight of the bike. And remember whatever
goes up, must come down. And when you get onto the
flat with a bike like this, that’s when they really
come into their own. (music with a beat) When you’re looking to book a race, you should always check
out the course before to see if your bike is set
up for the course ahead. Now, there’s a number of
lumps and tails on route. You may want to take a
look at your gearing, do you have enough? Today, there’s a lot of gear choices and cassettes on the market. For instance, I’m riding an 11-28 cassette to make things a little
thing easier on the climbs. (music with a beat) The more time you can spend on a triathlon bike the
better and being able to climb well on one isn’t
something that happens overnight. So give it a go and let
us know how you get on in the comments below. And to see more videos like this, you can subscribe to
Global Triathlon Network by clicking on the globe. And to see our road versus tt bike on the climb video, just click down here. And to see our essential suit
workout video to go faster, just click down here.