How To Climb Anything On Your Mountain Bike | MTB Skills

How To Climb Anything On Your Mountain Bike | MTB Skills


– [Man 1] Unless you live at a bike park
with uplifts, you’re going to have to ride to the top of the hills. – [Man 2] For the majority of us, we spend
more time pedaling to the top of the trails than we do descending. – So let’s show you the basics
of climbing, and allow you to enjoy all aspects of mountain biking. – [Man 3] Try that. ♪ [music] ♪ – Climbing can be broken down into three
main parts. Long, non-technical climbs on fire roads or deep tracks, short,
punchy, non-technical climbs, and finally, technical climbing on rocks
and routes. This is the most challenging type of climbing, because it requires the
greatest amount of concentration, forward planning, and a number of other
general mountain bike skills to finesse yourself up the climb. – The right gear selection is a major
consideration, especially if you live in the mountainous regions. – Choosing the ever-popular two-by setup
or the old trusty three-by setup will offer you a wide range of gears, allowing
you to monitor your effort and get to the top of any mountain. – If you have fairly strong legs, or live
in flat and rolling countryside, the chances are, you will be able to get
away with a one-by setup, therefore allowing you to get rid of those
excess chain rings and your shifter, saving you a little bit of weight. – Anything from a 30 to 36 chain ring
and a wide-range cassette should have you covered for everything. – I have a 34-tooth chain ring on this
bike with an 1140 cassette that allows me to climb up most things. – Further to-gear ratios or other bike
setup things are going to help your bike climb better. A
lightweight hardtail with low handlebars is great for going uphill.
On slightly rougher terrain, a full suspension bike will give you
better traction on the rear wheel, and those low handlebars help keep that
weight forward, and keep that front wheel on the floor. – Some bikes give the option
to play around with the geometry to affect how a bike goes up or downhill. My bike
is set on the low setting at the moment, so it’s great for going downhill. If I
flip this around the other way to put it high, it brings the bottom bracket
up, and makes the head angle a little bit steeper, but it keeps a bit more
weight on the front tire but also gives you that bit more clearance for the
higher bottom bracket to pedal over obstacles. – Pacing climbs is something that really
comes with experience. What you don’t want to do is set off too
fast and find that you blow up halfway and need to stop for a rest.
I like to warm into a climb, and then I know if I’m feeling good, then I’m able
to make a push towards the top. – We’re here at quite a technical climb.
Donny’s coming into it, and he’s changing, making his gear
selections early. As you can see, he’s in quite a high gear, so not to lose
traction, and keep the power consistent. So we’re here on the same climb again.
Neil’s approaching at an easier gear. Flags [SP] are spinning much faster,
and you can see that he’s struggling to carry momentum. – Short, steep, punchy climbs like this
are going to need power to get up. There’s no two ways about it. So you are
going to get blowing and into the red quite quickly. Quite often, the best way
is to stay seated, keep your bum over the back tire, and just drop your chest
to stop that front wheel from wheelying [SP]. Sometimes, you’re
going to have to stand up to get the power down to get up it. In that case,
be careful with your weight [inaudible 00:03:27] it’s really easy
to spin out the back tire when you’re stood up cranking. A nice feature of a lot of modern trail
bikes is the remote lockout lever. My Scott’s got one, and it goes from 170
mil [SP] travel to 135 to fully locked tight. Fully locked tight is also
really nice and efficient for climbs. You get that power through the pedals.
But occasionally, I’ll stick it on that middle setting, especially when it’s
rough, so that my rear shock opens up, and I can get traction when it’s
bumpy. The fitter you are, the faster you’ll get to the top of the hill,
but also, the easier you’ll find the really technical parts. – Having the energy to master technical
sections or steeper parts of the trail when your heart rate’s not max will become
far easier. – The stronger your aerobic engine
becomes, the tips that we’ve covered in this video will become much easier. – If you want to see more videos on GMBN,
you can click up there for how to ride a self-fitter on a normal trail ride.
And if you click up here, that will get you through to our climbing challenge. – Down there, folks. He’s got his pointing
all up and down wrong. – It went there. – And then you click over there in the
middle. You can click subscribe. – Just click anywhere over here. You’ll
get to the good stuff.