How To Choose The Right Mountain Bike For You | Ask GMBN Anything About Mountain Biking

How To Choose The Right Mountain Bike For You | Ask GMBN Anything About Mountain Biking


– Welcome to this week’s Ask GMBN. I’ve been joined by the
one and only Andrew Dodd, our technical master, here at GMBN Towers. We’re gonna jump straight
into your questions. We had absolutely tonnes in
the comments down below so I won’t waste any more time. Doddy, are you ready? – I am always ready, mate. – This is gonna get gnarly. Right, okay.
– Yes. – Jack Woods is starting off with, “I want to start enduro but I
really don’t know what bike. Suggestions, please.” Now, to help with this answer, because we’re sponsored,
we do have sponsors, I don’t wanna just suggest
our sponsor’s bikes but, because I’m gonna mention
our sponsor’s bike, I’m using this question from
Jaydyn Keating to help me. He’s also asking, “I’m getting into some technical trails and jumps and
love smashing the downhills and was wonderin’ what you’d recommend between the Canyon Neuron
and the Canyon Spectral. – The Neuron has less travel on it? – Yeah, the Neuron is 110, 120 travel, – Yeah.
– And the Spectral is 140 to 150.
– That’s correct, yeah. – I thought, that’s
kinda the area that Jack, who asked originally about an enduro bike, needs to be thinking. It’s about the size of travel really more than a specific brand. – And also, you gotta take
into account, as well, as the travel increases on the bike, the bike is gonna be stiffer and stronger. You don’t necessarily have to have a bike with lots of travel but there is kind of a
starting point for that, and about 140 ml on the
backend is that point. Where you can sorta jump the bike and treat it a bit harder.
– Yeah. – And yeah, the Spectral
is a fine bike for that. – Yeah, so a bit more forgiving, so Jaydyn, that’s a
really great suggestion from Doddy for you, but Jack,
answering your question, you’re looking at travel about 140 and you’re gonna have a really good option for everything there. It’s gonna be a great enduro bike. – Definitely. – There’s some good
riders taking a Spectral around the old EWS courses at the moment. – Yeah.
– Right now, Big Beachy is asking, oh no. – Sorry.
– Doddy’s dying. Are you alright?
– I’m alright. – Do you want me to continue
or do you need a break? – No, no, I was just hoping for
a cup of tea to be delivered but it hasn’t happened.
(both chuckle) – It hasn’t happened, no. – There’s no Jack here
to send off to get one. – No, we’ll order one in. Jack! (wind blowing) I think he’s on the stairs.
– That sounds good. – Big Beachy is asking, will
a short stem and wide bars always be good, even on a XC bike to turn
it into a trail bike? – No.
– No. – Because if you put short stem on a bike that’s already short, you’re just gonna be super upright on the bike,
really twitchy, and not good. You’ve either gotta have a
bike that’s nice and long, in which case you have a short stem, or if your bike is short,
you’re gonna need a longer stem. So sit back in your cockpit, the correct size for
your arms and your torso. – It’s about fitting you onto the bike. Your physique is not gonna change the geometry of what’s below you. The stem is where you
start fitting you in. – But mentioning wider bars there, as you do come back in stem length, I do recommend you go
slightly wider in bar length to compensate for that. ’cause if you just want back in stem, it’s gonna bring you upright, so if you come back with a short stem, you gotta a wider handlebar, you can maintain that position but you still get an
advantage of the short stem. – That’s very smart.
– We’re talking ten millimetres at a time,
not like something extreme, going from a 70 to a 20. That would dramatically change everything. – Good point, and all that stuff’s worth thinking. It makes such a difference to your bike when you start messing
around with stems and bars. It can be a lot of fun. – It can, yeah, but you don’t go too far, – Yeah.
– To start with. – Especially on cutting down bars. Don’t do the old cutting
down bars mistake. – Measure twice, cut once. (Martyn laughs)
Always. – Max Schreiber is
asking, “I have a problem with my Rock Shox XC30
coil, it’s an oil fork. – Yeah. – After I forgot to unlock the lockout, I used the fork too much, jumped it a bit, all that kind of stuff, but now, his lockout has
got too much travel in it. – So it’s gone a bit mushy? – Bashed travel into
his lockout, which is, what can you do about that? – It’s hard to say without
seeing the actual bike but it does sound like you basically bent a couple of shims inside. It’s nothing bad but
lockout, all it does is, basically, reduce the oil flow. – Yes.
– They do have a blower feature on them so
if you jump or something big, it will open the valve
and the oil can pass. It just sounds like by running
it locked out all the time, you’ve damaged those shims, basically, that are inside there. That can be replaced and fixed
by a local suspension tuner. Or just your bike shop. – A bit of a service in order, probably, for those.
– Yeah, you should be okay. – And while we’re talking about services, why don’t we take a look at this video that some dude here made
about servicing forks. – Oh, that’s handy. Your next step is to
remove the foam rings, these are underneath the wiper seals. Get a pick and very
carefully pry these out without damaging the
seals or anything else. There we go. Hit me up. – That’s a good video that, well done. – Yeah.
– Well done, I like that. Right, now, Jack Mantifel says, I live in Ontario, lucky.
– Nice, yeah. – I am looking for a
good bike vacation spot. Last year, I went to Mount
Saint Anne and loved it. I ride XC but I love
renting downhill bikes and riding the trail
centres, where should I go? What a great question. Because we just talk about,
– Where indeed. – Where we like riding and I love that. I love that. If you’ve been to Mount Saint Anne, you should think about, well,
you must have done Whistler, you must have done Whistler.
– I guess so, yeah. – If you haven’t, you must. – You can also do Silver Star. That’s in Canada, that’s
another cool place. – I think we should think
more outside the box, because Whistler, that’s
actually easy for you. That’s easy for you. – I’m throwing out there,
– Yeah, yeah. – Bali. – Bali. – There’s a bike park in Bali.
– Wow. – That’d be a good one. – I’m gonna suggest something like Lege. How about comin’ over to
Europe and doing a bit of Lege, or, where could you go?
– You know what? There’s an event in, well
not specifically in Lege. Lege is part of the Porte du Soleil, it’s a region in France. It’s got about nine towns.
– Yep. – And the opening week of the season, they have an event called
Pass’portes to Soleil and you basically start
from one of the towns, whichever one you wanna stay in, – Yeah.
– You have one lift pass, and your aim is to get,
using the chair lifts, to get up to the top of the mountain, traverse, chair lift, traverse,
get around all the towns. It’s about 90 or so
kilometres of riding in a day and it is such a fun event. – You said you like XC, that– – It is amazing.
– There you go. You’ve come to Europe. You’ve ridden the Pass’porte to Soleil. – And then you hang out there
and then after that day, you decide which area you like the best and you can ride that
for a week’s holiday. – Nailed it. That’s the holiday for you, Jack. – That’s what you wanna do. That’s the end of June? Ish, around there. – And we wanna see a video about it. – A hundred percent, get it in. – Right, Hansteeze Production says, “Hello GMBN, I’m interested
in product development in the area of working
with bikes, awesome. Right now, I’m looking for uni programmes where you have the opportunity
to work and develop bikes and bike parts after uni. What sort of programme
should I be looking at? I guess it’s product development, and then you just gotta take the direction of bikes yourself really. Lots of people I know in the bike industry have done stuff at uni and I remember– – Lot of engineering
background people, as well. – Engineering background, and definitely, bringing out products
now that they started working on at uni.
– Yeah, it’s crazy, isn’t it? – I was testing, it’s not
really mountain biking, but it’s very close, I was
testing a wheelchair recently by a company called Mountain Trike, and Tim who runs that company, he basically designed it in his product development
course at uni, and now he’s got little niche in the industry and he’s selling these
things all over the world. I think if you’ve got
the ideas in your head, if you get into, like Doddy says, engineering, product development, you’re gonna be on the right track. – You know, I’ve got a great idea for a video that we should do. – Is it me designing
and making my own bike? – No.
– Ah, damn. – I’m doing that. – Ah yeah, that’s where
I thought of that idea. – But we’ll work on it together. – But I think we should do a video on different occupations
in the bike industry, ’cause there’s loads.
– Yes. – If you think there’s
paramedics, there’s photographers, there’s bike designers,
there’s tour guides. There’s so many ways you can work in the bike industry.
– Absolutely. – I think it’d be really interesting. – There’s people who
sit, looking very bored, behind cameras.
– I know. I can’t imagine why
somebody’d want to do that. – Hang on a minute. – What you doing, Dan? – Right, next question, moving on. But good lucks, Hansteeze
Production, do get into biking. – Yeah, good luck.
– Hope you find your way. – Bradley Michelmore says,
how come trials bikes, trials bikes,
– Yeah yeah. – See what I done there? How come trials bikes are classed as mountain bikes but BMX is not? Just wondering as I know
they’re completely different but they’re both doing
tricks on rigid bikes. Let me explain some trials to you. Let’s all sit down a minute.
– You asked the best person. – Let’s take a moment. Trials is the sport. There are lots of different bikes. BMX, 20-inch wheeled, race bikes, freestyle bikes for skate parks, and use ’em on BMX trails. Trials bikes, there are 20-inch version– – That’s where they started, isn’t it? – That’s where it comes from, but then the mountain bike side come in, people like Hans Rey started
doing trials on mountain bikes, for GT, of course, in the early 90’s, and it kind of branched
off into it’s own realm. There’s mountain bike trials
and then there’s comp trials, which is 20-inch bikes, which are the ones with
the little tiny wheels. They’re two different things
really but the aim is the same. Basically you have to ride over obstacles without putting your feet on the floor. Which I was never very good at. I could always get my head–
– He was alright. He’s World Champion. – I could get my head on
the floor, no problem. Every time. – You could barely get your
head in the arena, could you? (both chuckle) – Oh dear, right, okay,
with that little excuse of a trials question, I’m gonna throw us to Doddy and Blake’s trials
challenge in Whistler, which is just hilarious.
– It is quite funny. – And your trials skills were good. – I’m good at bunny hopping, I know that much.
– Check it out. Welcome to my Whistler Trials Challenge. (funky music)
(laughter) – It’s heavy. – [Doddy] I wouldn’t go that way, Blake. – [Blake] It’s close. (funky music) – Did you win that challenge? Did you win? – No.
– I think Blake stole it on some kind of cheat skid line. – Something like that, I can’t remember. Do you know what, the
only thing I cared about was that horrendously hard line that you were laughing at
us for not being able to do. – I did do that.
– I did actually do it, it’s just the camera wasn’t rolling. – As soon as the camera was off. Classic, classic. – I conquered it for myself. – Do you remember Blake
going over the bars? – I do.
– Oh my God. – Never seen anyone go
over the bars like that. – He basically bunny hopped
himself over the handlebars. – Incredible.
– I’ve not seen that before. – Incredible.
– Like, deliberately. – It’s like a skill to
be that bad sometimes. Anyway, right, carrying
on, Zach Sigouin says, “Would a 130 ml to 120 ml trail bike be suitable for Squamish Enduro Race? The guys I ride with
use full on enduro bikes but I keep up with them no problem.” – The thing is, you don’t, I mean, bar out and out downhill racing, you don’t really need a bike
that’s a genre-specific bike. You can ride any sort of mountain bike for any sort of mountain biking, some bikes are gonna
be better than others. What you might suffer with yours is damage to your bike. For example, sat bikes, probably gonna have some
lighter weight wheels, the wheels are the first thing
you’re gonna damage on that before anything else.
– Absolutely. – Maybe if you wanna do that sort of racing and riding with your friends, get yourself some slightly
bigger, more aggressive tyres. It’s gonna give you more traction. The shock transmitted to your
wheels and to the frame’s gonna be slightly less,
and that might help, but, because of the nature of your
bike being a lighter bike, you might suffer with tyre clearance. It’s something you need to factor in. But generally, you can ride
most things on most bikes, but if you’re gonna start
riding it really hard and jumping and that, don’t
expect the frame to last. That’s the first thing the
manufacturer’s gonna tell you. You voided the warranty by using it for stuff that it’s not designed for. – Stuff that’s really hard to gauge. I tell you what’d be really
interesting for you, Zach, is to have a go on your friends’ bikes with a slightly bigger travel and see what that does for your riding. ‘Cause you’re keeping up
with them on less travel, your bike’s working pretty hard, you might get on that a
little bit more travel and think, ah–
– This is what I need. – This feels great. When a bike starts feeling
comfortable, you know. – You might get one of those bikes and ride them up the hill and be like, (scoffs) not into this.
– Yeah yeah. – Doesn’t work for me. – Try it out, see what you think. It’s all about what feels good and feels right for your riding. Like Doddy says, don’t pigeonhole
yourself into one thing. – Just be nice to your bike there. – Yeah yeah.
– It’ll last longer. – Check those wheels. Right, Rob Fulcher says,
“I’ve been riding clipless since I started mountain
biking three years ago. Now my riding has progressed
and I’ve taken the plunge and bought some some flats.
– Good man. – Yes, and the shoes to go with it. Any advice for flat pedal virgin? Especially on jumps.” I’ve got a bit of advice but I’d like to know what Doddy thinks first. – Before we jump in, I would say, master bunny hopping,
– Yeah yeah. – Basically, on flat pedals, because– – That is a good point. – Specifically, flat pedal bunny hopping, I think it teaches you so much about your body weight and your
position on the bike, and you can directly apply that
to lots of trail situations. – I’ve got a suggestion for you, right, but you look like a total
nutcase when you do it. Bear with me and do it somewhere quiet, maybe on your street late in the evening or something like that, but
basically, practise no footers. I don’t mean jumps. Don’t get onto a jump yet. – You mean jumping off the pedals? – Jump off the pedals on flat
ground and stick your legs out and then get them back on the pedals. The movement is gonna be pedals, this is your front foot,
this is your back foot, and you’re gonna jump off the pedals, put your legs out, now they’re level, and then back onto the pedals. Once you realise that your feet can leave the pedals and go back on, and you can find your placement, it’s the placement back on the pedals that you’re gonna get used to. – That’s a very good bit of advice. – Just get your foot and
you’ll suddenly realise, oh, my foot doesn’t have
to be in the perfect place. I can sort it out in
the next pedal rotation, or something like that. You just start to realise
how forgiving it is, how much more time you’ve got, and you’ll really start to enjoy ’em. Learning to push yourself
out of your comfort zone is the first bit so go make
yourself look like a loony. – One other factor to add in there, just to accentuate that, riding with clipless pedals,
you’re used to the fact that your feet won’t get bounced around. At first, on flat pedals,
you will find your feet move a little bit, even if
you’ve got really grippy shoes. Just try and keep your heels down, keep your weight on those
heels and that really helps with your foot position and how sort of stable you feel on that bike. – Absolutely, absolutely, yeah. – And enjoy it, they’re fun. – Enjoy it, and enjoy your
trying your no-footers. You’ll laugh, you really will. – Nick John Bautista says, “I have a hardtail bike with
internal cable routing.” I can see where this is going. Dobby, you’re not gonna like this. “I want to upgrade to
a dropper seat post.” It is, it’s going where I thought. “Problem is there’s no provision for cable or internal cable seat post.” Oh no.
– Yep. “Is it safe to drill a
hole in the seat tube?” Drill a, I knew the word drill was, I knew the word drill was coming. – Really, we can’t advise anyone that it’s safe to do that. – Don’t drill holes in your bike. – I’ve got friends who’ve done it. It’s been perfectly fine but,
– Yeah. – You’re on your own if you do that. Basically. – Your warranty is, you
literally just sat light to it if you put that drill in it. It’s not something we
can recommend, is it? – No, but we’ve seen it many times, and people have done it
successfully and it does work. – I’ve seen it done. Don’t drill holes in bikes. Jimbo450 says, “Hey guys, love the show! Can you please tell my
mum the difference between a 500 pound hardtail and
a full suspension bike and why I need one for
enduro/all mountain?” I would love to. They’re just flipping awesome. That’s probably one of the reasons. – They’re really really
expensive full suspension bike that you need for enduro
and stuff like that. You’re also gonna need some
really expensive clothing to ride it in, really expensive helmets, insurance, expensive locks. You’re gonna need to ride it a lot more places a lot more often, maybe some resorts with ski
lifts and stuff like that. – Doesn’t it sound fun, mum? – You have to do it.
– Doesn’t it? Doesn’t it sound fun? – Logical progression. – And let’s give you a
fighting chance here, right? A 500 pound hardtail, it’s
a great entry bike, right? – Definitely.
– You’re starting in the right place, you’re
gonna have a lot of fun, but if you’re doing well on that bike, you’re gonna start
needing to replace stuff. Quickly, you’re gonna think, this bike’s not worth spending money on. I need to upgrade. What are you gonna upgrade to? You’re gonna upgrade to something that’s very similar to what
you’re thinking about now. If you’re really into the sport, you’re really enjoying it, maybe that enduro bike is just perfect. You need some full sus in your life. Did I do well? – I think so, yeah.
– How have I done? And if we need–
– Buy him a new bike. – If you wanna prove it anymore, let’s take a look at hardtail
versus full suspension. Great video where all
the answers are there. – Yes, we have and I think you’ve got the wrong weapon of choice, Doddy. – Alright, yeah, I’m on a hardtail. It might not be the best terrain for it but I wanna do today is show
you, show all of you guys that a fairly budget hardtail
with modern geometry can definitely still cut it. – Well, I’ve got 160 ml of travel. – I’ve got 29-inch wheels, it’s fine. We’ll get into this in a minute. – Let’s go. – Time for the quick fire round. It’s gonna get serious. Doddy, hold tight. – Yes, I’m ready. – Szaman Szymon says, it’s about time to invite the guys from behind the camera in front of it and let them speak. Their voices are coming through anyway. Dude, you wanna? – You wanna come around
here and say hello? – No.
– No. – That was a no. Sam Clode says, you
should do a game of bike with Danny Macaskill. We should but we’d have
to join a long queue. We’ve had to join a long queue. Who wouldn’t? I might ask him, though, I might ask him. – Why not, yeah. You know who I’d like to
do a game of bike with? – Who’s that?
– Ali C., Ali Clarkson. – Oh yeah, he’s amazing. – He’s flippin’ amazing that guy. I love him, he’s brilliant. Christian Lamprecht says,
can you do wheelchair check? – Yeah, we could do wheelchair check. – I was just checking. It’s there. Fernando Gonzalex says, why you move, I like this, this is another language, why you move Ask GMBN to
Monday instead of Thursday? It’s just a scheduling thing, you know? We wanted to move it
away from the Dirt Shed, link the two across the week.
– Yeah. – It’s all very technical. – And there’s loads of other stuff being filmed all the time here. We’re really busy so. – And I don’t think you noticed, there’s a couple other
channels hanging around. There’s this EMBN thing that’s turned up and GMBN–
– Tech. – Techie, or something? Next one is from Konsantin Petrenko. Says, “Can Jack shred?” – Yes.
– Who’s Jack? Oh, is that little Jack?
– Little Jack, Flap Jack. – Yeah, he’s quite a good rider, yeah. When he stops talking.
– He can ride. He’s not behind the camera today, – No.
– I’m afraid. We’ve got some kind of
mute who won’t speak. He’s there. Oh, he’s there. 318Arnie says, “A global trials
network would be awesome.” Wouldn’t it? Should we do that? – Who’s gonna subscribe? Like you, Peter Krauss, Anne.
(Martyn laughs) Maybe Mackinoff.
– You’re mean, Doddy. You’re mean. – I’d actually quite like it. – Too late now, we’ve moved on. MTBOCD says, “Can I have the helmet that’s on the shelf behind you? And the goggles. No. – No, that’s the complete
one off, that one. – RedstoneHacker, “Can
Martyn walk or not?” Not.
– No, he can’t. (both laughing) – I couldn’t resist putting that one in, ’cause it’s such a ballsy question. Like, who… Dude, can you walk or not? Like, are you gonna get up? – He’s just in a wheelchair for fun, yeah. Man.
(Martyn chuckles) – A guy in Sainsbury’s offered
to pray for me the other day. He just went, I’m gonna pray for you. (both chuckling) Okay, can I have a bag for this? Jack Murphy says, “I started
racing enduro last year, ended up coming fourth overall, which I was quite pleased with.” That’s not really a question. – It’s not but yeah, well done. – Good way to end today,
though, thanks very much. Let’s get into “Correct Me If I’m Wrong”. – Oh, this is good, what do we got? – We’re gonna start
Correct Me If I’m Wrong with a note to last week’s show. We were talking about– – Who was on last week’s show? – It was just me.
– Oh, just you, is that right? – Just me, on my own, on my lonesome, but something came up last year, last week, about how we don’t, in the UK, don’t really have to worry about the damage to trails in wet weather. – Because a lot of the
trails are designed for that. – And obviously, our
drainage is different, got a different system going on. I know over in other places in the US, they really have to worry about that. – Of course, you have
sensitive trail situations. Yeah, we get that. – I just wanted to read this
out from Wheelbite ’cause he gets a great point across. “From a dedicated Southern California trail builder and maintainer”, okay, “Please, for the love of God, (chuckles) do not ride trails when
or right after rain hits.” Alright? Because it just trashes
the joint, and it adds– – It’s the best time to ride in the UK. Straight off the rains. – In SoCal–
– I get it in SoCal, for sure. – Three to four hours of maintenance, instead of building new
features, is what the result is if you ride when it’s pouring
of rain or just after. – I completely sympathise
with that, as well. – There’s a lot to think about there. I just thought I’d bring
that note up from Wheelbite because he was kind enough to add a little bit on
from the show last week. – I would like to say to any of those guys who do ride in SoCal and places, it’d be so cool at some point if you factor in a trip
to the UK and try and come and ride some of our
armoured sort of trail centres, and see why we can get away with riding in those wet conditions. – It’s a very clever solution. – The first place you need to go to is Coed y Brenin, that’s in North Wales. It is the very first mountain
biking trail centre and, if anything, it rides better in the wet. It’s fully armoured, it’s designed
to handle those conditions and it’ll really open your eyes to the sort of what we can ride in. – It’s amazing.
– It’s really good. – I don’t even really think about it. – No, we’re so used to it.
– Yeah, it’s crazy. – Our Correct Me If I’m
Wrong video this week is from Rob Macaskill, I
don’t think it’s a relation. – It’s not Danny’s brother, no? – No, I don’t think so. It’s from North Carolina. Working on his table tops, Doddy. – Ah nice. – We’re gonna give a little
bit of critique to this. Here we go. It’s a great looking video. Here he goes, nice.
– Hey, that’s pretty good. – There’s a lot of movement going on. – Using those shoulders to
crack the bike over a bit there. – Right, now, he does twist
the bike off the takeoff. – Yeah.
– Yeah. It’s almost like a front high whip. – I think there’s two schools of thoughts on the table top thing.
– Yeah. – You see a lot of riders now, let’s just say new school riders, doing it mostly with upper body. Pulling the whole bike over sideways. And then you get the sorta
more old school riders, I mean, I kinda learned to
bike trying to copy people like Steve Gill and early riders, where you actually use the takeoff to sort of start kicking the bike a bit, and you actually lay the whole
bike over with your knee. Your outside knee, you want to tuck it right in on that top tube.
– Yeah. I think something like a table top, somewhere where you can really
let your style come out, and I think the way you’re
going into this trick, Rob, to me, makes me feel like, you could do a down whip,
know what I’m saying? It seems like what’s gonna suit you more naturally is rather
than trying to do a table top where you go off the jump and then you lay the bike flat that way, you go off the jump and
turn the front end down. It looks like it’ll suit you more. Because you’re trying
to do this, then that, you’re getting this turn of the bike, whereas if you come off that jump and just turn that front end down, then just let it lay there and then let the front lead you into the landing. – I also think the style
of the jump does affect it. It looks funny angled there. It’s either a double or maybe
a slight step down jump. Until you can table, they’re
actually harder to table on. A step up, or even jumping
out of a bomb hole to flat, is the ideal way to get the bike into that sort of position
to lay it over flat. It does vary on the way you wanna ride. – I can definitely see a
down whip for ya there, Rob. – Do you know what,
who you should copy is, watch some videos of Bryn Atkinson riding, cause he does those down
tables all the time. – They look really good. – If you wanna get some good style points, just have a look at the way he rides. – Hope that helps, Rob, gives you some– – Keep cracking on.
– Some encouragement. But it’s looking good, it’s alright, mate.
– Stylish. – You’re moving the bike around so that’s good.
– Yeah, nice work. – Thanks for watching Ask GMBN this week. I’ve really enjoyed having Doddy along. – Thank you for having me. – Maybe we’ll swap around next week and you can aim some at me.
– 100%. – Thanks for watching. If you want to see some more videos, then why don’t you click just up there, where you can see a really
great video of Blake Samson riding in some very strange clothes. I don’t know what to make
of it but it’s a lot of fun, and I’m enjoying–
– Blake in strange clothes? – Yeah, it sounds like a
normal day out, doesn’t it? But he loves those videos
and I love watching ’em. Hit the old globe there to subscribe, and of course, we would love
some thumbs up style below. Give us some questions for next
week and we’ll see you then. Thanks, bye.
– See ya next week.