How To Choose Eyewear For Mountain Biking | All You Need To Know

How To Choose Eyewear For Mountain Biking | All You Need To Know


– If you’re thinking about
buying some riding glasses, and why wouldn’t you? You only get one pair of eyes
so protection is important, then you are in luck. With the help of Oakley, who
are sponsoring this video, I’m going to talk you through
the various different types of mountain bike eyewear
and the different features to look for when making that purchase. (logo booms)
(gravel crunches) (energetic dance music) Of course, Oakley is just one of many other brands out there, but when making this purchase,
I would definitely consider cycling or even mountain
bike-specific glasses for the job. So just like when you’re buying a bike, there’s some of the same
considerations come into account, like the type of riding you do and the conditions you ride in. That will influence your
riding gear and your glasses. Downhill or trail riding,
Southern California or Yorkshire, picking the right glasses,
or should I say eyewear, ’cause actually I’m going to
talk about goggles, as well, is going to make a big difference
to how useful you find them. The great thing with most
glasses, you will be able to change the lenses out to
make a certain piece of eyewear really versatile and usable in
different riding situations. Before I get into the nitty gritty, why is it a good idea
to ride with eyewear? ♪ Oh, boy, you got me really good ♪ ♪ Yes, I ♪ – Eye protection from debris, from the sun and its harmful UV rays, flying bugs, eye-watering winds at speed. Does that look fast, yeah? And they even give you some
protection when crashing, but I don’t crash (laughs). ♪ Boy, I’m going to get it ♪ – Right, let’s start
with the different types of riding glasses and the size of them. So bigger isn’t always better. We’ve got three different
size glasses here from Oakley. So these are the Flight
Jacket, the largest. Compare that to the Jawbreaker,
getting slightly smaller. You see the coverage definitely changes. And then down to these Radar EVs, definitely a bit more slimline. Different size glasses will give you obviously different amounts of protection from things like debris and the wind, but you also need to think about
compatibility with helmets. So I don’t consider myself a style icon, but if I’m wearing a full face helmet, then I’m likely to be wearing goggles ’cause I’ll be riding downhill, enduro, or hitting some big jumps,
and goggles just offer the best protection from
the elements, from debris, but also a bit from crashing. Some people do choose to run
glasses with full face helmets, which some consider to be a fashion no-no in mountain biking, but if it’s hot, it probably does make sense
because the ventilation is much, much better than with goggles. (lively dance music) Getting glasses that are sort
of compatible with your helmet is going to help, as well,
so the frames and the arms of the glasses, making sure
they don’t touch the helmet or are getting pushed inside your head, ’cause that can be uncomfortable. So that’s the sort of size the
frames will influence that, but also, some glasses
will have adjustable arms to make sure you get a perfect fit. Does the top of your glasses
touch the brow of your helmet? I know some people have helmets
that sit a little bit lower, and if that touched when
your helmet moved around, that would become super annoying. So these don’t, so I can
choose a larger set of glasses like these Flight Jackets. If you do get any sort of interference to your glasses and helmet,
then you may want to go for some more modestly size frames. Also on looks, maybe if
you’ve got a slim face, you might want the smaller ones, as well. The big ones might look a bit extreme. That might be the look you’re going for. (energetic dance music) What about the glasses’ arm
under or over the helmet strap? Well, you may know that roadie
rule, it’s an unwritten rule that they have to run
their glasses over the top. I don’t think us mountain bikers have to, and actually, these fit
much more comfortably with the arms underneath the strap. Bigger glasses, more protection, but that does make a
difference to the wind that rushes underneath them, as well, so the bigger glasses will help with that. I find that happens probably more on a road bike, to be honest. I think the average speeds
are just that bit higher. Doesn’t happen quite so
much on a mountain bike, but I’m sure plenty of you watching this will ride road bikes and mountain bikes, so you might want to consider
buying one pair of glasses you can do both things in,
and obviously, as well, you can swap out different
lenses that will be better for each different discipline. Right, let’s get into the lenses. So these are tinted lenses, obviously better for the sunny conditions. Going to take some of that glare off. Got a bit of a sunny day
here in England today. But also don’t forget, importantly,
UV protection, as well, so keep your eyes nice
and safe from the sun. These are, in fact, Oakley’s
Prizm Trail Torch lenses on these glasses now. So you may have heard
of this Prizm technology that Oakley have. So Oakley have designed this to filter out the different wavelengths
of light, basically give you a very vivid and vibrant
view of the trail, so you see better contrast between things like roots and rocks
and the trail surface. So we have Prizm lenses designed
for golfing, got Road ones. These are Trail, so designed
for mountain biking, and actually the Torch version of those. (upbeat dance music) Got the two different versions of the mountain bike lenses
here, the Prizm Trails. So in my left hand here,
you’ve got the Jawbreakers with the originals,
they’re a bit more bluey. In my right hand, got the Flight Jackets with the Trail Torch, the brand new one. See there a little bit more
sort of red-dy tint to them. Oakley have designed these to
be a little bit more balanced, a little bit less
punchy, so they work well under the trees, like we’ve got here, and out in the sunlight. It’s definitely worth
considering having spare lenses for, you know, eventually
when they get a bit scratched, but also to have spare lenses
for different conditions. So if you live somewhere like
the UK where most of winter is too drab and dark to
actually wear tinted lenses, then a good set of clear
lenses will do the trick. Also, you might even consider
buying a set of lenses for riding on the road, so with Oakley, you can buy that Road Prizm if you wish. So it’s easy to get a pair of sunglasses that will suit both
mountain biking and roads. Would you then go so far as considering the aerodynamics of the glasses? Well, I wouldn’t, but Oakley
do, and you might want to if you’re very serious
(coughs) nerdy mountain biker or more likely, closet roadie. (upbeat electronic music) Back to the size of the
glasses, smaller-framed glasses like this Radar EV will
offer better ventilation, so potentially better in hot conditions, but also when things
start to get wet and slow and that dreaded steam starts to happen. Some other glasses offer different ways of trying to get around that. There are different ways
that manufacturers design their anti-fogging abilities, from specific coatings on the lenses to actually design features. So on the Jawbreaker, you can
see there’s actually vents in the lenses, bottom and top. Also over on the Flight Jacket, you’ve got that sort
of frameless top there so steam can rise out of
there nice and easily, and this clever little feature, I’ve not seen this one before. See how the nose piece moves back, move the glasses further
away from your face to give you a bit more ventilation. What about goggles? Well, I’ve already said what
they’re really good for, downhill, enduros, more
extreme types of riding, but also some of the same considerations need to come into
account, like do they fit inside your full face helmet? Lenses, you’ll have
probably lots of options, actually, on clear to tinted. So same, different types
of riding conditions will suit different lenses. A question I’ve heard before
is do ski goggles work for riding your mountain bike? Whilst they look very similar, there will be a few small but
quite important differences. That does come down to things
like the foam on a ski goggle is likely to be fleece-backed
for keeping you warm. On a mountain bike or motocross goggle, more like a sort of CoolMax foam there, designed for ventilation to keep you cool. Also, with lenses, you’re likely to get mirrored lenses on ski goggles, and it’s just to give you
a different visual dynamic as compared to a mountain bike goggle. What about goggles with
an open face helmet? Well, yeah, some riders like
the feel of extra protection, maybe not on a cross-country ride. You will overheat, but for
some shuttle-assisted riding, why not, that’s another good option. (dynamic dance music) Other considerations to research
before making a purchase? Well, price is obviously a big one. The more expensive, the
more premium materials are going to be used, the more
features, the more technology. The lower the price, less of that. Also think about the actual
protection they offer, so have those lenses been
tested, are they safe to wear? What about the amount of different lenses you can get for those
glasses for replacements but also for options like premium lenses, clear ones, different riding conditions? What about fit? Some glasses will offer different types of fit, like Asia fit. Also the adjustability of the
temple length with those arms. Finally, what do you
get with your glasses? Do you get a nice little hard
case to keep your glasses safe and a pouch that doubles
up as a lens wipe? Because probably your
glasses get damaged more in your gear bag than
they do out on the trail. Right, if you want to see a
couple more videos from Oakley with GMBN, then over there
for GMBN Meets Greg Minnaar, a Factory-sponsored rider,
has been for years and years. And if you want to see a Factory tour, Si Richardson takes you around that place, the crazy place in Southern
California, click over there. Give the video a thumbs up
and hit that subscribe button.