How To Change A Tyre On Your Road Bike

How To Change A Tyre On Your Road Bike


(swoosh sound) – Now for most cyclists out there, it’s going to come to a point when it’s time to replace
the tire on your bike. Perhaps it’s got a big cut in it and something which is
not that safe to ride on or maybe you’ve actually just worn it out. Either way, for some people it
is quite a daunting process. Perhaps it’s your first time attempting it or maybe you’re just a little bit unsure. So today, lets look at how
to do it nice and easy. (soft elevator music) Now you are gonna need a
couple of tools for the job. So firstly, you are gonna
need some tire levers, so that’s to be able to
remove the tire from the wheel and also a pump to be
able to get it inflated back up to a decent pressure and maybe, just maybe, a spanner, depending on what type of wheels you have. So first off, you’re actually
going to have to remove the wheel in which the
tire you’re replacing from the bicycle and now if you’ve got a quick-release skewer,
it’s nice and simple, just undo that lever and
remove the wheel from the bike. If you’ve got nuts on the axle, then simply use the spanner
to release one nut at a time so you can take that wheel out. Once it’s out, it’s simply a
case of deflating the tire, so in this case, I’ve got
a presta valve on this rim, so I’m gonna actually
unscrew the valve here and release all the air. If you’ve got a Schrader type valve, so that’s one of the ones
which you find on a car, then simply depress that center section and again you’re gonna
remove all of the air from the inner tube. And the next step is to actually insert one of the tire levers in
between the bead of the tire and the actual rim itself. Now I tend to actually always
work opposite the valve. The reason being, you
tend to have a little bit less material, because
around the valve itself is a little bit of bulk, so
here you have got essentially the most room to be able to
play with and insert that lever underneath the bead. So once you actually get
it hooked underneath, try and grab your tire
lever and actually insert it behind a spoke there,
keeping it nicely in place. Then, with your second tire lever, try and put it underneath
the bead of the tire, again getting as close as possible to the existing one. Sometimes, depending on how tight your rim and tire combination
is, it’s not possible. In this case, I’ve managed to do it about five centimeters away,
and then simply release that bead over the side of the rim and work around until
you’ve got enough over that it’s nice and comfortable for you to simply use the tire
lever to push the remainder of the tire away from the rim. Now do take care whilst doing this that the inner tube itself
doesn’t actually get pinched in between the tire and the
rim and using, obviously, the tire lever there, so just
pay close attention to it. So now that you’ve got half
of the tire off of the rim, you’re gonna want to
remove the inner tube. So, again, working opposite the valve, simply release that inner tube from within and then work it around
until you get to the valve and then it’s easier to
remove it that way, basically, because in the case of this wheel, it’s got a deep section of rim, so the valve is actually pretty long. Just remove that. Then the rest of the tire
should easily just pop off, slide off like so. So now that you’ve removed
your inner tube and tire, it’s worth just having a
look on the actual surface of the rim bed, here, so if
you’ve got yourself a rim tape, whether it’s plastic or
cotton, in this case, just make sure that all
of those spoke holes are being covered nicely and again, there’s no actual material defect inside which could give you a
puncture going forward. Once it’s all good, you are
ready to fit that new tire. Next thing is to grab your
new tire and have a look on the sidewall of the actual tire itself, and see if there is
any directional arrows. In the case of this one, there is one here which is indicated with rotation. The reason being, that is likely to help with both rolling resistance
and also displacing any surface water on the
road that you may encounter. If there is one of these arrows, make sure it is facing in
the direction of travel once it’s fitted onto the rim and then I like to always find the manufacturer’s logo
and then line it up with the valve hole, just a
nice little finishing touch. So now that you’ve got yourself
your manufacturer’s logo and you’ve found the valve hole, you want to insert half
of the bead of the tire inside the bed of the rim
and slowly work that around, so it’s going like so. So, now that you’ve got
half of the tire fitted, it’s worth grabbing the inner tube and simply inflating it very gently, so only a small amount,
just to get the inner tube to actually have a shape and
then lock down that valve. So now the inner tube
has a bit of shape to it, actually insert it into the valve hole, which is nice and easy to
find because you’ve had that manufacturer’s logo,
and then simply tuck it inside of the tire like so. Now if you’ve put too much air in, it won’t go in that easily,
so just be aware of that. And then, at the valve, start
tucking that remaining bead of the tire over the sidewall of the rim and in towards the center. So if it is a little bit
tight towards the end, just go around the actual rim and the tire and essentially squeeze the beads inwards so they go into, there’s a deeper groove in the center of the rim in most cases and that’s gonna give
you a little bit of slack for you to be able to
play with when it comes to trying to get this
final bit over the sidewall of the rim. So just make sure, like I say, that it is in the center of the rim. Now when you do get to
a situation like this, when you have a very tight
fitting bit of tire, perhaps, that it’s best to actually
put the wheel onto the floor so that you can get a
little bit more leverage inside of your wrists to
actually get that tire over the sidewall of the rim. What though, if you’ve
used up all of your energy and you still can’t get
the bead of the tire over the sidewall of the
rim and into the center? Well, I don’t normally advise using them, but you can in fact use a tire lever, so you would simply place it underneath and then over the sidewall,
so the hook of the rim, and then gently, really, really gently, making sure you’re not
pinching the tube whatsoever, move it over. So just levering it into place. Now the next stage, what I like to do is just to make sure that the tube has not become pinched in between
the bead of the tire and the bed of the rim,
so I just go around and work the bead away from the sidewall and just check to make
sure that, basically, there’s no sign of any
rubber poking out underneath. If there is, then you can
kind of wiggle around the tire and hopefully that inner tube
will just pop back into place. Then I’ll repeat that
process after putting about 15 PSI of air into the inner tube, which is about 1 bar of pressure. And then, once it’s all good, I inflate it to the maximum recommended,
which is indicated on the sidewall. That way, the tire
actually finds its shape as well as in the case of using where, the tubeless compatible rim, actually pops into the
correct position on the rim. Now that your tire is
fully seated onto the rim and running nice and
smooth, it’s probably likely that you are gonna need to
adjust the pressure there to suit both you and your riding style and then refit it into the frame. Now there are many of you out there who have got different
ways of fitting tires and tubes back onto a wheel. I’ll be keen to read them. I have fitted literally thousands of tires onto wheels over the years
and I’ve never had a problem doing that one yet. However, there is a little
tip and this one’s for free, is to get a tire and
put it over a radiator if it’s a particularly stubborn one. That way it does tend to
just soften up a little bit and be a little bit easier to put on, but as ever, I want to
know your tips and tricks for fitting those stubborn tires. Now, do remember as well to
like and share this video with a friend. I believe that actually fitting a tire is one of those real essentials
because you never know when it’s you or someone
else stranded at the roadside and you’re gonna need that skill. Now also, remember to
check out the GCN shop at shop.globalcyclingnetwork.com where we’ve got a whole
array of goodies for you. And now, for another great video, this one on how to calculate
the right tire pressure for yourself, click just down here.