How To Carry Your Cycling Spares

How To Carry Your Cycling Spares


– For all but the shortest bike rides, you’re gonna need to
take some stuff with you. At the bare minimum, a mini-pump, a multi-tool, and an inner tube to help
you fix any road-side mechanical problems. – Yeah and avoid having to walk home. Weirdly, though, how you
choose to carry that stuff is the subject of much debate. – [Dan] Do you use a
saddle bag, in training? – Yeah, of course, yeah. – Yep. – Always. – Of course. – Yes. – No, no way. Because, yeah, I have one at home but
I always forget to put it on or, so I put my stuff in my back pockets. (smooth jazz music) – So what are your options then? Well firstly, the jersey pocket. Or pockets. Now if you are wearing
cycling kit, the chances are that on your jersey you will have pockets on your lower back,
normally three of them. And so these are absolutely perfect for popping a mini pump, an inner tube and a multi tool in before
you head out the door. And away you go. – Now, this is particularly convenient but there are downsides. Now if you’re going out for
a reasonably long bike ride, you’re gonna wanna take
some food with you. Potentially quite a lot of food. So let’s just put some of that in there. – Can I have a mix of bars and gels? – Yeah, a mix of bars and gels. Secondly, you’re gonna wanna take another layer of clothing. And even packed down nice and small, it’s still gonna take up a fair bit of room. And finally, in this modern
era, without shadow of a doubt, you’re gonna wanna most likely
take your phone with you. So let’s just pop that in there as well. – Now, that is starting to
feel like quite a lot of stuff, it must be said. It’s still comfy, given
that this is a nice, tightly fitting jersey, but it’s not far off starting to feel like a
really massive bum bag. Matt, that’s probably enough. Enough food now. – Just one, just one more
because you can never be sure, mate, just one more. – Right, fair enough. As well as feeling like I’m wearing some kind of giant rucksack, when we’ve talked about carrying items in your jersey before,
some of you have raised concerns about safety, specifically the idea of falling off when you’re carrying a mini pump in your central pocket, therefore over your spine. – Now I’ve never actually
heard of that happening, ever, but I guess it is more
of a risk than attaching the pump to your bike. – Yeah. (smooth jazz music) – So, tuck your multi tool
and inner tubes neatly behind your saddle. In fact, heck, let’s put two in. – [Simon] Whoa-ho! – And you can leave it there, so it’s always with you. – Unless, unless you happen to be lucky enough to own more than one bike, in which case you need to
remember to take it off and swap it between them. Although I suppose you could actually buy
more than one saddle bag but it seems like an extravagance. – Hmm. But what about the other downsides, Si? Now believe it or not, saddle bags can be just a little bit of a contentious issue. – True – And there are people that think a saddle bag, fitted to a
nice, lean, fast race bike just looks a little bit out
of place and I must admit, I tend to agree. – Yeah, yeah, yeah, it can, can’t it? However, I think that is actually that’s cool. – I would agree with you on this. This does look pretty sleek. That does fit the bill. – That is cool. The other downside, though,
is that if you pack it poorly, you could end up with rattles or jiggles, neither of which are good. – And so, what about the
most important question, Si? Aerodynamics. Which is the most aero? The pockets stuffed with stuff? Or, the humble saddle bag? Well, we consulted our
aerodynamics experts over at our friends at Zipp to answer this very question. And it was David Morse, the
advanced development engineer, who was unfortunate enough to
have to answer this question for us. – Yeah, sorry Dave. He said, that although
they’ve not actually tested this particular scenario in
a wind tunnel, which I can’t quite imagine why, he said
that he would lean towards the saddle bag as being
the fastest option. And then furthermore, he then went on to say, that actually, if a small
saddle bag like this one, and we stress the word small, actually then affords you the
luxury of being able to ditch your jersey and put on
a skin suit instead, then it would be an absolute slam dunk for the saddle bag. – So, perhaps counterintuitively,
the humble saddle bag is gonna be well, the option of choice,
for speed merchants. Although we must stress, it needs to be an aero one. – Yeah. That took me by surprise, you know. (smooth jazz music) Yep, the half water bottle. Neatly packed, and then stored
inside one of your water bottle cages. Which admittedly means
that you will take one less water bottle with you, but probably then just
good for short rides. – The advantages, well arguably, aesthetics if that’s your thing. But very much like the humble saddle bag, it’s always with you. – Doesn’t it fill up with water? – Only if it rains. – So, so what’s the point? – It just looks pro and neat. – [Dan] And finally, do you
use a saddle bag in training? – No, I use a bottle, bottle cage. Think it looks more, more sexy. – [Dan] That, it’s just down to the looks? – Exactly, yeah. (smooth jazz music) – What if you need even more space, though? Well, we’ll admit, we are into
unchartered territory here. We don’t often use frame
bags or bar bags or panniers, although all absolutely have their place. But, we think that unless
you’re doing the most epic, self-supported ride, if
you’re gonna be home before the end of the day, then
you probably don’t need that extra space. – No, but check this out. This is former Giro d’Italia
winner, Ryder Hesjedal’s tool bag. And yes, you have spotted
two chain-link removers. He takes those on every ride, too. – Was there, though, Matt, anything to fix a broken handlebar? – Not that I spotted, no. (smooth jazz music) – [Both] Oooof. – How, how’d he hold
that up in flip flops? – Skills. – Anyway, ultimately how you
carry your stuff on your ride would depend on how long
you’re riding for and how much stuff you’d like to carry with you. – Yep. Short rides, I think jersey pockets.
– Yep. – Medium rides, I’d go for a saddle bag, and then on long rides, following car? – Fair enough. But, there is no real wrong or right. – Nope. Actually, hang on a minute, Matt. There is definitely a wrong. Have a look at this clip. – [Dan] Do you use a
saddle bag in training? – Nope. (laughing) – [Dan] Where do you put your spares? – I don’t take any. (laughing) – [Dan] Have you always
got a support vehicle? – No, no, no, but I always
rely on my good luck. (weak laughter from Dan) – Bobby! Bobby. You need to subscribe to GCN. You can do so by clicking on the globe. Not just Bobby, the
rest of you who haven’t. – He might already subscribe. – But you never know. – You never know. Right, if you’re after more content, then how ’bout these two
videos which are very relevant. Firstly, how to pack your saddle bag to stop rattles and jiggles. That one is just down there. And for five essential road-side fixes, which you will need to
know, click just down there. – Remember, no rattles or jiggles.