How To Avoid Pedal Strikes On Your E Bike

How To Avoid Pedal Strikes On Your E Bike


– A pedal strike on your
trail ride can mean tears and it can certainly
stop you in your tracks. There’s a lot of talk about pedal strikes when it comes to e-mountain bikes. It’s all about technique rather than fitting shorter cranks to your bike. So, today we’re going to be taking a look at how you can avoid pedal
strikes on your e-mountain bike. (upbeat percussion music) (upbeat music) (upbeat music) (upbeat music) (upbeat music) (digital clicking)
(volt striking) So, what exactly is a pedal strike? Well, a pedal strike occurs when you’ve mistimed your footing and your pedal strikes
an object on the trail, be it a rock, or a root,
and it can be pretty nasty. Sometimes you can simply
pat your pedal on top of it, which isn’t such a big deal, or it can be a full-on strike where it will stop the
bike in its actual tracks and normally try to flip
you over the handlebars or try and high-side you down the trail. It is not a good look. (upbeat music) (upbeat music) So let me introduce you to a few members of the rock strike family. We’ve got one here, we’ve got one there, and we’ve got one here too,
they’re all over the place. Now, why might a pedal strike occur? It’s usually down to a couple of things. You really need to forecast where your feet are going up the hill. You need to analyze that trail and think, I’m going to pedal there,
my next pedal’s there, as you work your way up the hill. It’s kind of like working
footsteps up a hill. Also, your sag might be
incorrect on your bike as well. So your bike is sitting
down into its suspension too low, that means you’ve
got your weight on the bike your pedal and bottom brackets
are going to be really low and just waiting to strike
every single thing in its way. (upbeat music) (upbeat music) So, how are you going
to avoid a pedal strike on this next section of the trail? Well, this part of the
trail is really key, the switchback before that steep climb. It’s your chance to analyze how much power are you going to need to get up the climb. So, which power mode
you’re going to be in, which gear you’re going to need to be in. And also, take a quick
look at those possible rock strike situations. You got one here, you’ve
got one this side, and another one, and another
one before that step. That step is also where
you’re going to need to put a lot of power in
to get the bike up there. So, I’m going to try to come
into here, nice bit of speed, and use a bit of motor overrun. So, I’m going to free-wheel pass these. Then once I’m clear of these two rocks, put on the power to get up that rock step and hopefully clear those
next two pedal strikes that are going to happen. Sometimes it is inevitable that
you will get a pedal strike on top of a rock, they’re
not such a big deal, it can sometimes help,
sort of, claw you up there if the pedal lands flat. Just be ready for how
much of a pedal strike you’re going to get. If it’s going to dig down behind the rock you know it’s going to stop the bike dead. But, as I say, on top of the
rock isn’t such a big deal you might just find
yourself lift a little bit but that doesn’t mean you
got to stop on the trail just use that pedal to
get past the object. (upbeat music) (upbeat music) Motor overrun is definitely a key skill to avoid those pedal strikes. Now, you might notice the
motor once you start pedaling, especially after you’ve
been pedaling hard, will actually turn a few
revolutions and then stop. So, you can actually use this
to glide past those obstacles you see on the trail. You really need to put in a massive effort before you need to shut off. Then simply glide past that rock strike using the overrun with your pedals level or lift them to get past the obstacle. (upbeat music) (upbeat music) Not only does a pedal strike
want to attack you going uphill it wants to attack you wherever it can. It can be on flat trails, it
can be on downhill sections. Exactly the same thing applies. You need to scan ahead
and read the terrain as it comes into you. Looking for things such
you’re pedals going to strike on the right and on the left-hand side. Particularly if you’re
free-wheeling through an open bit you might tend to drop a pedal slightly. So you’re pedaling with one
pedal low and one pedal high. This is really bad technique
and if a pedal strike is around it will certainly bite you. It can cause a pretty nasty crash especially when you’re
cruising through the woods and not expecting it. So on technical terrain, it’s
really important to go through there with your pedals
at three and nine o’clock reading the terrain before it attacks you. And even think about
things like compressions, when your suspension bottoms-out, that it’s not going to
cause a pedal strike. You really need to look ahead
and think about all those different rocks and roots
and how your bike is going to be affected by the terrain
and adjust your feet so you don’t hit a pedal strike. (bike wheels spinning)
(exhales sharply) So, there you go. I really hope you enjoyed today’s video all about avoiding pedal
strikes on your ride. There’s a few things you want
to take from today’s video it’s all about checking
out the sag on your bike to make sure you’re not
running too much sag, so sinking down and getting
low to the pedal strikes. ‘Cause remember 30% sag
for your rear shock. Also, anticipate that terrain as it comes. Think about where your
feet are going to be and things like that. But if you wanted to stick
around to check out another video check out Steve and his
technical climb video down here. That’s a really cool one. Don’t forget to give us a
thumbs-up if you enjoyed it. Drop us some comments in the box below about how you guys avoid
all your pedal strikes. Whilst your there, Subscribe
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