How Much Does It Cost To Run An Electric Mountain Bike? | E Bike Yearly Costs

How Much Does It Cost To Run An Electric Mountain Bike? | E Bike Yearly Costs


– Riding an e-mountain
bike is a load of fun but you definitely need to
stay on top of the maintenance otherwise it can end up costing
you quite a bit of money. So today I’m going to be
breaking down those costs, one by one, and see how much
cast you’ve got to splash to keep your wheels turning for a year on your e-mountain bike. (electronic music) The first and most important consideration to take into account
is what e-bike you have or what e-mountain bike
you’re about to buy. At the end of the day high end e-bikes have high end components. So if you’re replacing
those high end components, like for like, you’re going
to be spending a lot of money. Therefore a mid-level e-bike is going to have mid-level components, that way you’re going
to save a load of money when it comes to replacing
those high wear items. The mountain bike industry
has been chasing faster and lighter components for many years. But as e-bike riders, we
just want good durability from all of our components. We’re not after spending loads of money for something that might give us a marginal performance
gain out on the trail, we just want it to last a lot longer, just remember that 300
pound lightweight cassette isn’t going to get you up or downhill any faster than say a 60
pound cheap, budget one. (upbeat music) So let’s take a look at some actual costs of running your e-bike. Well we’re here in the UK
so we’re going to be using pound sterling for this. Now one of the first costs
you’re going to be looking at is actually charging your
battery on your e-bike. Depending on which combination
of battery and charger you’re using to charge your battery, it’s going to roughly take
about four to six hours of charging that battery from
fully flat to fully charged. This obviously depends on what
size battery you’re running. Now this is going to cost you about five to 10ps worth of electricity and that compares to
roughly about 2.5 pence to boil a kettle. Now this, if you’re doing
it every single day, say for a commute or something like that, it’s going to cost you
36.50 pounds a year. So chuck 36.50 pound in the kitty. (upbeat music) Your tires on an e-bike can
definitely take a hammering, the rear tire’s responsible for hooking up and driving you up the climbs. Your front wheel and tire’s responsible for giving you all the
grip from your front end and in the corners. Now if you’ve got slick tires
on your e-mountain bike, you’re not going to be
getting up any climbs and you’re certainly not
going to be doing any braking. Another factor to consider
is the tire compound. Now a soft compound tire
is going to hook up better off-road, but if you’re
riding them on the road, it’s definitely going to
wear out a lot quicker. So where you ride and how often you ride is also going to factor
in how much tire wear you’re going to experience. If you ride in soft, muddy trails, you’re not going to experience
the same kind of tire wear as someone who’s riding
rocky, hardcore trails. If you’re riding once a week or you’re riding five days a week, you’re also going to experience
a lot more tire wear. I find that I use two
pairs of tires a year. So that roughly equates
to 50 pounds per tire, times that by four, 200 pounds. (upbeat music) If you’re running tubeless
tires on your e-mountain bike, then you need to think
about the maintenance of the tubeless set up too. You need to top that sealant up to provide that puncture
protection all year around. Now depending on where you
live and the temperature, this is going to vary, but
you need to be doing this about three or four times a year. I think if you’re a tube rider
then you need to think about the tubes you’re going to
be repairing or puncturing, so you need to think
about puncture repair kits and tubes for the year. Now with tubeless sealant and tubes, you’re roughly going to need
to save around 20 pounds a year to keep on top of this. (upbeat music) Your chain is probably one of
the most highest wear items out of all the components on your e-bike. Now you really need to keep on top of this by de-greasing and lubing the chain before every single ride. Otherwise if that chain is worn out, you can take out the chain ring, you can take out the cassette and these are more pricey components to replace than just the chain. Now if you’re aiming to replace the chain, you need to go for a
middle of the road chain, it’s roughly going to
cost you around 30 pounds. The cassette on your
e-bike is another thing that can take a hammering too. If you don’t keep on top of this, you’re going to experience a gear skipping and jumping around, especially under load on those hill climbs. Now an average cassette is going
to cost you around 80 pounds to replace. Now another part of your drivetrain that can wear out is going
to be the front chain ring. Now this is going to be
pronounced on something like the Bosch Generation 3 motor where you’ve got a small
chain ring at the front, meaning that it’s got to
do a lot more revolutions to say, compared to something
like the 34 or 36T chain ring like we’ve got on this bike here. If you’re going to replace the chain ring is going to be around
30 pounds for a new one. Right let’s recap the drivetrain costs. Now this consists of the
chain, the chain ring, and the cassette. Remember if you want max
efficiency out of your drivetrain then you need to replace all those components at the same time. If you’re riding regularly, off road, then you’re going to need about
two sets of drivetrain a year, and that’s going to
cost 280 pounds per year to get the max life out your drivetrain. (upbeat music) Brakepads on your e-mountain bike can also have a pretty harsh life too. They’re responsible for
bringing that bike down from high speed, mixed
in with about of moisture and a bit of grime and
paste from the trails, means it can be a pretty high wear item. Now if you want max life
out from your brakepads, then you need to be sticking
sintered pads in there. Now brakepads come in roughly
at about 15 pounds per wheel, and you’re going to need
two pairs of brake pads a year, at least. So that’s 60 pounds going into that kitty. (upbeat music) One part of your e-bike
that often gets overlooked is the suspension on it. Now this is really important to provide that magic carpet ride feel across technical terrain. Your fork’s going to need a bit of love, they might need an oil change, and they might the seals replaced, it’s pretty much the same
deal for the rear shock too. Now if you’ve got a full suspension bike, you’re going to have a bit
more of a sting in the tail, because you’re going to need
to get the fork serviced and the rear shock serviced. If you’re lucky enough to run a hard tail, you’re only going to need
to get the fork serviced. These are going to come
in at 100 pounds per end, so 100 pounds for a hard tail or 200 pounds for that suspension
servicing for the year. (upbeat music) Taking an e-mountain bike to a bike shop to get it serviced is definitely
going to bump up those costs over the year. We have loads of videos here on EMBN and GMBN and GCN for those
day to day maintenance, you can do on your e-bike
yourself, pretty easily. Don’t forget you’re going to
need some tools to do that so it isn’t exactly going to be free. If you’re not confident on the spanners, then you need to take
your bike to a bike shop to get it serviced. Now to keep it sweet,
you’re roughly going to need about four services a year. Now these come in at about 50 pounds and that’s just for labor alone. You need to factor in
parts on top of that. So you’re going to need
four services a year roughly to keep that bike running sweet so that’s 200 pounds to keep it rolling. (upbeat music) Part and parcel of
looking after your e-bike is going to be washing it, cleaning it, lubing it, de-greasing it, so you need to factor in
all these items as well. You can of course use water
just to wash your bike and that’s going to be free, but a dedicated bike wash
is going to make your life a lot easier. Also things like lubes and
de-greasers for your chain and drivetrain is also another expense. So I think you need be adding
on around 50 pounds a year to make that bike run sweet. (upbeat music) So a quick recap of those figures to keep the e-bike running
sweet for the year. If my mental arithmetic serves me right, I think it’s 1046 pounds and
50 pence to keep that e-bike rolling sweet for the year. But don’t forget, it’s going
to vary on how much you ride, where you ride and the type
of riding you’re doing, and the type of bike you’re replacing those parts on as well. But let us know down in
the comments box below about how much you spend on your e-bike and the parts that you wear
out the most down below. Give us a thumbs if you enjoyed it. Don’t forget to hit the globe
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