How Fast Are Pro Enduro Racers? | Neil Donoghue Vs Josh Carlson

How Fast Are Pro Enduro Racers? | Neil Donoghue Vs Josh Carlson


– Just how fast are the
Enduro World Series pros? Well, I’ve come here to Whistler right in the midst of Crankworx
and Giant have sponsored this video and today I’m racing their EWS pro rider, Josh Carlson, all aboard the brand new Giant Reign 29er. (uplifting music) (boom) Josh is currently sat
in 19th in the series. He had a great result just
yesterday of sixth place. I used to come third here
in the past, in 2106. So he’s definitely got the
pedigree at this place, I’m just hoping he’s
feeling a little bit tired ’cause the race was only just yesterday. (uplifting music) So what about the new bike? Well for this test, we’ll
both be riding the same bike, the brand new Giant Reign 29er. Yes, 29 inch wheels have come to the Reign for all-out enduro bike. What about the numbers? Well it’s got a 65 degree head angle, so nice and slack. 76.8 seat angle, again getting steeper. 146mm of travel on the back of this bike with a 16o mm fork up front. There’s also a bike park
Slayer version of this bike, the SX with a 170 fork up
front, and of course, shock on the rear. The reach comes in at 455mm
for a medium size frame, so definitely on the larger
size of things nowadays. – [Announcer] Giant say the
Maestro Suspension linkage is designed to be active and efficient. Giant are a huge bike
manufacturer and a benefit of that is they’ve got their very
own, state-of-the-art composite manufacturing facility
to make super complicated parts, like this top
locker above the shock, out of carbon fiber. – [Announcer] A floating pivot
point gives you a vertical axle path which Giant says makes it both super-sensitive and efficient. (dramatic music) (soft music) – Right, so this is the
day after the weekend so you’ve had four big days of riding. – Yeah, it’s been a big week. – How are the legs? – Legs aren’t too bad, the
body is definitely tired today, yesterday was brutal with the rain and the long stages, it was a tough one. – I mean that is the
challenge of racing enduro, it’s such a combination of things. You’ve got to be really fit but
you’ve got to be able to adapt to trails as they come
out, ’cause you’re only going to practice those trails once. And you’re riding this weekend in Whistler but next weekend, or two
weekends away in Tahoe, where it’s completely different
trails, you’ve just got to be able to ride everything
and be good at it. – Yeah, completely different. We’re literally going from the
humidity, moist, wet slippery routes to next weekend we’ll
be in moon dust, rocks, alpine Californian dirt. – And you riding the 29er? – Yup. – Is that something you like? – Yup, on the new Reign 29er,
I think being a bit bigger, like I’m over 6 foot, and
being on the bigger wheels is definitely, makes me
feel a lot more comfortable. I’m stoked to be on this
bike and it was definitely a huge advantage this weekend,
here in Whistler, for sure. – XL frame is it? – XL frame, yup, with a 45mm stem, 170 in the fork and a
coil shock in the rear. – Right so we’ve seen the
trail, we’ve just ridden up actually one of the climbs,
which I’m not looking forward to, that is pretty
punchy near the bottom of this. I think it’s time to do a sighting lap. – [Announcer] Whoa, whoa, whoa, hold on. Josh is EWS shredding machine, Neil doesn’t even stand a chance. To even out this race, we’ve given Neil a 30 second head start. The guys will be racing
down Whistler EWS stage 3, all 2 kilometers of it. The track drops 206 meters
in elevation with a mix of techie trails, littered
with roots, rocks, spiced up with a punchy
power-climb to really wring out the legs before the final section. It should be a good
all-round test of fitness and technical ability. So let’s see if Neil can hold on. (beeping) (dramatic music) (beeping) (dramatic music) (singing in a foreign language) – So times are in. Yesterday you did 5:29, was it? – Yeah, I think it was a 5:29 yesterday. It was pretty spicy in
the mud and all the rocks at the top were– – [Neil] I can imagine. – Diabolically slippery. – It was kind of slippery
today, even though it’s been rad hot today, it’s dried out a lot. You went 80 seconds faster today, did it feel faster? – It didn’t, ’cause then
I definitely didn’t pedal as hard on the climbs. Didn’t feel like I dug as deep
as what I did during the race but in the bottom section,
and in all Roam in the Loam I think I knew it a bit
better and the dirt was a lot drier, a lot, lot drier, so you can commit a little bit more. – I was a little bit slower, 6 minutes 20. A minute slower. (laughs) – Same, same. – And I feel like I’m dead. Like that was one of five
stages you raced, or six stages. – Yup, yup. – And I hit that climb in the middle lunch like be going brrr And just absolutely done. So I feel sick now, I
don’t feel like I could do anymore stages, so I am
definitely an ex-enduro racer. How do you approach a day like that, when you know you’ve got
to go fast on every stage and it’s going to be such hard work? – Man, you just have to take
it each stage as you’re going especially with the weather
yesterday in particular. The first two stages, I tried
to keep reasonably smooth and calm and collected and
not make any major mistakes ’cause you could really, really
bleed some time yesterday. And with the big stages in the afternoon, they just got gnarlier and
faster and all the above. – And you just got to do what you can do. – And you got to do what you can do. You’re not really worried
about burning too many matches or being unfit because everybody’s fit and that’s just what we’re used to. So you’re used to those max
efforts, three, four, five, six times a day. So there’s no real holding
back on a stage like that and especially with those pedals. Those pedals are so short
and sharp, it’s full gas, as hard as you can go. – [Neil] Stood up the whole way. – I just got my seat
up, just as I crested, but otherwise it’s seat up
as long as you can stand up and sprint (mumbles). You know, probably it’s
only a minute long, so you’re probably looking at anywhere from 7 to 900 watts for
that minute if you can. – Some people say 29ers
might make it feel easier but you’re always going to ride
as hard as you possibly can. – Yeah, of course. – Do you feel like it’s
faster than the 27.5 bikes? – I feel like it doesn’t
feel faster than 27.5 bike but it definitely is faster. For sure, and especially for
me, I’m a little bit bigger and carrying that kind of
momentum through the routes here this weekend, the 29er
wheels had a huge advantage. So that definitely helped
me a lot in the racing in the wet, in the big, long stages. And with the high speeds of the bike park, having a bigger wheel with more inertia and higher speed capability,
it was really, really good. – Well thanks, Josh. And well done for not just
beating me, obviously, but for coming sixth at the EWS Whistler. – Yeah, thank you. – If you want to see a
video where myself and Blade get absolutely beasted by Nino
Schurter, click over there. And if you want to see me get
beaten by cross country pro, Titouan Carod, click over there. Lift thumbs up and hit
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