How Do I Find My Maximum Heart Rate? | Ask GCN Anything

How Do I Find My Maximum Heart Rate? | Ask GCN Anything


– Welcome back to another Ask GCN-ything This week were talking about why the cyclists shave their legs and not their arms, how to lose weight while cycling, and also how to build your endurance. – And don’t forget if
you’d like to get involved on next weeks show then as always, use the hashtag #TORQUEBACK and if you want the chance
of winning three months of free subscription from Zwift, then to use the hashtag #ASKGCNTRAINING. – Right, get your laptop out let’s get the questions going. – So the first question
comes in from Doug Mason. Looking to replace my handlebar tape. I’ve reviewed your instructional video and get the concept. My question is, adhesive or non-adhesive tape? What are your thoughts on the two options? Right, first off, I’d go for adhesive. It’s got a sticky back tape so you can really get some tension in it, it sticks better, and, yeah, then you don’t take it off, and it stays in place. – Whereas I prefer the nonadhesive because you could take it off, clean it up properly,
– Controversial. – Not so sure, clean it up properly and then re wrap it. And also generally speaking, a bit stretchier, the nonadhesive stuff, because you don’t have like a layer of stickiness that didn’t stretch that well. – So, nonadhesive, adhesive, make your own mind up but have a go and try both. – Yeah, probably best to make your bar tape choice based on the actual
stickiness off the bar tape and not what’s underneath it.
– Yeah, true. Go on Chris tell us who the lucky winner of
this weeks three months free subscription from Zwift is. – This weeks lucky winner
is Todd Vranas with, how does one go about establishing their
actual max heart rate? I am never able to get into zone 5 even including hard finishing sprints. – Good question, there is a calculation you can make which is.. – 220 minus your age, so 220 minus your age, mine’s 31 so it would be 189. But I know for a fact that
doesn’t actually work for me. – Yeah so, to get your actual max heart rate you can actually do a test or you can do an
exercise or a workout, and we’ve put one on Zwift that you can try out and it’s basically a go til you blow. – Yeah, exactly, so set your threshold, your power, no matter what your actual power is to 100 watts in Zwift. Every 2 1/2 minutes you
increase your intensity by, I think it’s, 25 watts. And you maintain that until you explode, basically when you can no longer continue. Make sure you do this when
you’re really really fresh– – That’s super important because the fresher you are then you
can actually get to your max. If you’re fatigued then you won’t really
reach your potential. – Yeah, you also mentioned
in your comment that you’re finding it hard to
get to zone five so that kind of implies that your
heart rate zones currently are not calculating correctly because it should actually be relatively easy to get
your heart rate up there. – Hundred percent, so
give that session a go and please do let us know how you get on in the comment section below. – Next up is a question from Marko Piellc, I started using a fan to keep
cool during indoor cycling. But only a couple of
days later I got sick. I have tried it again after that, but I would get sick every time in the next two or three weeks Could this be a coincidence? Is anyone else having the same problem and what can I do to resolve it? Can your body adapt to riding
with a fan blowing at it? – Right, interesting question, I personally have never had an issue using a fan but, what could be going wrong is that your fan could be
kicking up some sort of dust, or something from your house, and that could be
getting into your system, and you could be having a reaction. – Yep, or it could be that you’re now pushing
yourself that much harder because your body is a little bit cooler, you’re immune system’s a little bit weaker because you’ve pushed harder, and you’re picking something up that way. – Or, you have just got an illness and you haven’t really fully
recovered from that illness so every time you push hard, it’s just putting yourself
that bit over the edge. – Yep, so trying to experiment with– – Maybe going outside, so, just setting up your turbo outside, or setting it up in a garage, and hopefully some of those things won’t happen. – Basically it shouldn’t be
making you ill, should it? – No. Alright we’ve got a question from Dreamer, I like your name there. I do roughly 40 miles
a day four days a week but really struggle with losing my weight. I also love sprinting, seems to turn my fat into muscle. What Zwift training
session would you recommend to help me go down? I’m guessing in weight. – Good question, Dreamer. There are loads of work
outs on Zwift, which, if you type in fat burning
or something like that, will help you. But as it comes to losing
weight you actually just need to be in a
negative calorie deficit, so you need to make
sure you’re eating less than you’re burning. – Yeah, 100%, so make
sure you’re eating clean, you’re not eating too many like, carbohydrates ’cause obviously if you’re eating all
those big carbohydrates that’s gonna put on weight. But, it’s basically a balance really. So making sure you’re putting out enough fitness and enough exercise to burn those calories. – And it may be worth
trying to do a fifth day in the week as well, because actually if you’re
only doing four days that’s only just over half the week. So, you may be missing out, you know, space two rest
days throughout the week so you can have like
a Tuesday and a Friday as a rest for example. – Yeah, and lastly I would say maybe do an hour before breakfast, and a pre breakfast ride. It’s something I used to do a lot. And I did feel it helped me, but then, it’s all
personal preference really. So yeah, try those, and see how you get on, and other than that I would check this video out on losing weight through road cycling, and maybe get out on the ride, do some endurance rides
and see how you feel. – Good luck. – So here’s a neat little trick for you. When you get in from your ride, drink a really big glass of water, maybe a pint or so, before you have your meal. Let it settle in your stomach, and that way when you do
come to having your meal, you won’t feel quite so hungry, and therefore you’ll be a
little less likely to overeat. And you could also use this trick before your main meals of the day breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and even before your mid
morning and mid afternoon snack. Happy days, cheers. – Next up then, Phil Barker Hey chaps, why do cyclists
bother to shave their legs and not their arms? Surely the same, dubious, arguments apply to hairy arms. – Interesting question, but, a lot of cyclists do shave their arms, Oscar Pujol, for example– – He’s just weird. – He does shave his arms but, yeah I guess we don’t. When you get a massage every night, as a pro especially, if you had hairy legs I
think it’d be quite painful. – Yeah, it’d be pulling
on the hairs, wouldn’t it? – Yeah so, we, as cyclists,
tend not to shave our arms, and having shaved legs and shaved arms I don’t think it makes
a massive aerodynamic. – No it’s so negligible, it’s worth like a watt
to two watts or something at certain speeds, isn’t it? – Yeah, but if you’d like
to know what the pros do, then check out this video. Actually, that’s Sam Williams. – He’s a model now, that guy. – He is a model, yeah. Lastly, talking to our ex teammate. – Why do cyclists shave their legs? – When I first started cycling, I didn’t really know either I was a rugby player and, I didn’t really want to shave my legs but, it’s a lot to when you really crash, your hairs can trap bacteria
and stuff and it can lead to complications with, you know, infections and stuff like that. So it just keeps everything clean. – Right, we’ve got a question from Robbe Deweerdt. Is that good pronunciation? – Robbe Deweerdt, yep. – Hello GCN, just like any other Belgian, De Ronde Van Vlaanderen, is that good? – It’s close. – Is one of the highlights of the year. This year, I’ve signed up to ride the amateurs race, 229 kilometers. Now I don’t really mind the
cobbles and the steep… – Hellingen. – What scares me the most is the distance. My longest ride ever is 160
kilometers, mostly flat. Any tricks to train for the distance? I can train on Zwift and outside. Thanks guys, love the
show and the channel. Well, thanks for your question. – Well, Robbe, I would say that if you were comfortable
with 160 kilometers, then you shouldn’t actually
have any issue doing that extra 70 kilometers afterwards. What I would do, though, is build it back up to
that 160 kilometers, somewhere within two to
three weeks before the event, just to remind your body
what it’s all about, you know, activate those energy
systems it would be using for such a long endurance ride, and then make sure you fuel sufficiently. It’s gonna take your
roughly two hours longer than a 160 kilometer ride I would think, and it’s a pretty testing course, especially at the back end. – And I would say, though, is remember on race day, you get a whole ‘nother massive load of energy, because the adrenaline’s going, it’s an event. So, you kind of, your first 50 kilometers doesn’t feel like you’ve even ridden that fast.
– Exactly and you’ll be in a big group, it’ll be a big ride, so you’ll have a load of
draft support as well. – And it’ll be motivating, and exciting, and I think you’ll be fine. So yeah, do some 160 kilometer rides and 100% you’ll be flying through. – It’s gonna be an amazing
atmosphere I’m sure. – Yeah so, good luck with that and let us know how you get on. – Chad Paulin up next, I became a father of
two beautiful children, 13 months apart. Congratulations
– Hard work, there. – Yeah, this has made my
cycling suffer significantly. We are now in a routine and I’m on the bike
roughly five hours a week. I have been pushing myself with high intensity interval
training rides but, cannot get back to where I want to be. I’ve leveled off in my power
output and cannot break it. Would it be more beneficial
doing longer rides just below my threshold, or start cross training
to build new muscles? Thanks. – Good question, and I think, with that five hours a week you’ve got you can actually make some serious gains with that amount of training. – Yeah you can, and also, if you get to a point where you’re feeling like you’re not progressing
then maybe you want to address the intensity of all your rides. You cannot do every single
ride each week flat out, I’ve noticed I’ve two kids, and I don’t ride my bike much more than five hours a week at the moment. I’ve noticed that every time I ride I try to really push it
but that doesn’t work so, one or two rides each week, I’ve to set myself an intensity ceiling, so like 75% of your max heart rate and then ride at that for up to an hour and a half or maybe two hours if you’re lucky
to have the extra time. – But be patient with it, fitness doesn’t just come. I think you have to just, you know, work your way in, and just put the time in and try and string those rides together, and you will see an improvement. Just be patient. – Yep, good luck. Tommy van sante up next, I really like cycling and cycle a lot. But I’m still in high school
and have lots of home work. How do I keep fit? – Right, good question Tommy, but I would say enjoy cycling. Please don’t stress about staying fit, staying at the top of the level, just go out, enjoy it, home work really does come first. You know, because, it does make a difference, making sure you’re doing your home work. And school is important. – Make sure you do loads
of other sports as well, because they will really
help you at your age to develop your body in a well-balanced, all around fashion, and also it’ll keep you
fit to do your cycling. – Yeah, next question is David Shelly. I recently bought a 56
centimeter Allez sprint I had a 56 centimeter Raleigh. But for some reason my foot
rubs on my front wheel, whereas it never did on my old bike. Does this mean my Allez just is too small? – No, long answer short is, it just depends on the
geometry of the bike, doesn’t mean it’s too small. So maybe your new bike has
steeper, sharper racing angles which will make it more agile when you’re going quickly, but it will mean that
you’ve got a little bit of toe away for that. – Yeah, or it’s just your cleat set up. Maybe you’ve just got your cleat on the middle of the foot, and on your last bike you had it on your toe. So, it could be either or. – Next up, Nobleazure. Can a one single training
ride become so hard that it is no longer beneficial. If so, how do I know my limit before I should call it quits? – Yes, but, it’s gonna
have to be incredibly hard. And it’s gonna make you
feel exhausted after it– – Something like you did the other day, the 10,000 calorie challenge. – Yeah, that’s probably not the best way to go about training. – No, you’ve literally did
a months training in a day. – Yeah, and I probably
didn’t get much out of it it just probably made me go really slow for a really long time. – Yeah, if it’s taking you more than four to five days to recover from, that’s probably the tipping point of where you’re no longer
getting any benefit. And if you’re past seven days and you’re still feeling
the effects of it, you’ve definitely done
yourself more harm than good. – Yeah, so try that, just think about the training before hand. Next up is dsteed77, as a 110 kilogram rider, I can compete at the high level. I can lose 10 kilograms but my body type, tall, broad, and big-boned, is not suited to be lightweight
as other riders are. Should I train differently
than normal riders? – Well, dsteed, cycling is not just about pathway is it, at all?
– No. – Luckily if you’re riding in a race, then tactics, and drafting,
and all of these other things come into play as well. If it was simply an uphill
30 minute time trail, or a one hour time trail, then pathway is the defining factor, and there’s not a lot
you can do about that. You should aim to structure your training based on the type of rider you are, and what weaknesses you feel you have, not your weight. – 100% and that’s a really good answer so, we’re gonna move straight on from that. – Next up, disgruntledtoons, I may be mistaken about this, but there’s one aspect of cycling that I see little of on this
channel, charity riding. Some of us race, but a lot of us are more
focused on riding for charity. If you could cover at least
the majority of charity rides, ones with multiple thousands of riders, those rides would get
some much needed exposure. – 100% and we here at GCN are massively fond of pushing charities, especially ones that are cycling related. And actually, Emma did do
one for the buffalo bikes. So go and check out that video, where she did some pretty
incredible work for them. – [Emma] 95 pounds or $147 is one bike. 35 pounds or $50 is a tool set. And 450 pounds pays for a training course for a local mechanic to learn to build and
maintain buffalo bikes. In effect, they train one mechanic for every 100 bicycles delivered to their Bicycle for Educational
Empowerment program. – Next up, is Kevin O’Brien. Hi, there, looking to get out cycling but it’s quite wintry here in Ireland. What would you say is too
windy and not worth going out? This weekend winds are our forecast, winds are forecasted, sorry, for around 40 to 50 kilometers per hour. What do you think? – That’s a really good question, and I think it depends
on how confident you are, quite a lot, as a bike rider, because, if it was
40/50 kilometers an hour some parts of the ride might be quite sheltered
and you’ll be okay, you might not even notice the winds–
– It’d be fantastic if you had that for a tail wind. I mean Strava, Koen’s would come toppling down but– – Yeah I always get a
load of emails when it’s windy like that. – Yeah but I would definitely
take Chris’ advice, and if you go outside, and it’s blowing a hooly, then it’s probably worth
not taking your bike, and it might be worth just staying inside. ‘Cause ultimately safety is key, and we don’t want you to hurt yourself. – Stijn Ritzen, I
recently started Zwifting and am absolutely hooked. Also I did my first online race recently, but now my question. When you do such heavy
exercise like a race, where the cool down is not included, what do you have to keep
in mind with the cool down not to have any injuries afterwards and which stretching will simulate muscle growth and recovery? Kind regards, Stijn. – Right, a warm down is so important. Especially after a race, because you do go so hard, and the end of the race is normally a max effort and a max spread. The last thing you want to do
is jump straight off the bike and go and do something else or sit at the table and
have food or whatever, because then you’ll stiffen up, and you will really
feel sore the next day. So, putting in around 10 around 10 minutes after
the ride of easy pedaling, and that way you’ll bring
your heart rate down to around 55% as well, if you max. – Yeah, and then a little
bit of light stretching will also help with the recovery but, the main reason for doing any stretching is injury prevention.
– Yeah, 100%. – And for feeling, you know, it does help you feel better. – Right on that note it’s
the end of this weeks Ask GCN-ything, and you know
what to do to be involved on next weeks’ show. What do you do Chris? – That’s right, use
the hashtag #TORQUEBACK for all your cycling related questions. But, to be in with the
chance of winning a free three month subscription to Zwift, use the hashtag #ASKGCNTRAINING. – And before we go, do go check out the shop, which is located up in that corner. Yeah, the lefthand corner And you can go and buy some of these amazing GCN goodies, so go check that out.