How Can I Improve My Climbing? | Ask GCN Anything

How Can I Improve My Climbing? | Ask GCN Anything


(logo swooshing) – Welcome to this week’s Ask GCN Anything. Today we will be answering your questions on how to improve your climbing, what’s best to specialize in,
TTs, climbing, or sprinting, and how are disc brakes gonna improve as more pros start using them.
– Interesting. And don’t forget, if you’d like to get in on next week’s show, then to
use the hashtag #torqueback. And if you’ve got any
training-specific questions, then use the hashtag #gcntraining, and you’ll also be in
with a chance of winning three months free subscription from Zwift. – Right, let’s get stuck in. – First question from Tirey Pagel. In a few months, I will
undergo a minor surgery, which will involve a week of
semi-bedrest recovery time. Do you have any insights
on how I would get back into training after a long
period of medical recovery? For what it’s worth, I use Sufferfest for
training, and a Wahoo Kickr. – Hey Tirey, best of
luck with your surgery and your recovery after that. One thing I’d like to say
is do not underestimate just how hard your
body’s gonna have to work after that surgery to
get back to where it was, so the rest in those initial
few days is absolutely crucial. Don’t even look to do anything. You’ll really speed up your chance of actually making a
full recovery quickly. – Yes, and then I would
use the turbo trainer as a good tool to get back to fitness by maybe starting off with
an hour just pedaling, and then as you start to get fitter you can implement some intervals, and then it won’t be long,
so don’t worry too much, before you’re back to good fitness. Next up is a question from Bla Bla. I’m liking that name. I’m only 61 kilograms and 185.
– Centimeters. – Centimeters, so I’m
not the born sprinter, so I’d like to focus on my climbing. What can I do to improve
my climbing strength with no mountains around where I live? – Well, this is a question
that a lot of people actually ask, and it’s not that difficult. – It’s not. – Because if you do live near flat roads, it’s the continual loading on the pedals of a really high effort
that will help replicate the climbing that you’ll be doing, so probably best to over-gear slightly– – I was gonna say, yeah.
– So you’re gonna aim for a cadence of 75 to 85, which
simulates riding up big hills. And then you’ll want to be on
the pedals as long as you can, so your efforts of 20 to 30, 45 minutes. – Or even an hour. – Even an hour.
– Yeah. – And you really want to push it hard for that entire duration, so kind of max intensity to
failure for that duration, and that will replicating
riding up big climbs. It’s never gonna be quite the same. You’re not gonna stand up in the same way. The bike’s not gonna feel
the same underneath you. But it goes a long way to
increasing your aerobic fitness, which is what you need for those climbs. (logo swooshing) And the winner of this week’s Zwift question is Terance Hore. I’m Cat 1, trying to get
into the National Road Series in Australia, basically
a continental team. I’m a climber and TT rider
with some sort of sprint, but it is my weaker attribute. Is it better to specialize
in my climbing or TT ability, or should I strengthen my sprint? Thanks in advance. – Yeah, if it is the climbing
that you’re focusing on, that you put training into, remember, don’t neglect your sprint, because often in a race scenario you’ll break up the bunch,
let’s say on a climb, but you’ll still maybe come the finish or the last couple of
what, four to 200 meters with maybe a small group or
a very much condensed group. – Yep, and answer the
question, who’s gonna win that? – Yep, it will be the best
sprinter of that group. So remember, put in some sprint sessions, maybe one in seven days or two
in 14 days or however many. But don’t neglect them, because ultimately the one who has the
biggest sprint will win. – Yeah, and you might find, actually, if you’ve got less power, seated sprinting might be something that you can really work on, so trying to get really aero
for those fast finishes. Next up is a question
from Sergio Cristancho. Hi GCN, I’m coming back from a serious accident
where I broke my jaw. I’m trying to get back into training after three months or more, and trying to start indoors until I get a full all-clear on the
medical side of things. Two major issues, one, how do
I approach getting in shape for the longer rides after riding indoors, and also how to improve my confidence and focus my mind on the road, and also the people around
me are worried for my health. – Right, I’m super, yeah,
we’re both really sorry to hear about that awful accident, and we hope you get back to
your normal self very quickly. But in regards to getting
back to fitness and endurance, the indoor trainer is good for endurance, but there’s no shortcuts
to building endurance, is there, mate?
– No. Just try and get yourself
as fit as you can whilst you’re indoors, and
that way when you go outdoors it won’t be as much of a shock, and you’ll just have to slowly rebuild after all that.
– In regards to the family. – Yeah, I think the best
thing is to emphasize just how important your
cycling is for your health, your wellbeing, the mental side of things, and why you took up
cycling in the first place, but also put them at
ease and let them know that you’re not taking any risks and you’re boning up slowly. You’re not trying to rush back into getting where you were before. Just bit by bit, I think is the answer. – Or a good thing is
to stick to bike paths if they are around, so
then you’re not worried about traffic and all that kind of thing. So stick to bike paths until
you’re even more confident, until you’re out on the open roads. – Yeah, the road to recover
can be quite a long one. It’s not unusual for you to
not feel quite right again for maybe even as much as a year. But if you persevere with it, every single ride will
build your confidence, build your fitness, and you’ll
get back to where you were. – Yeah, so keep at it, and really good luck with your recovery. Question from Dejaune Jones. Hey guys, I’m a former
professional downhill speed skater. Wow, that’s pretty cool, isn’t it? Getting ready for the bike
season here in the States, and soon to be hopefully on the States under-23 development team. I’m not working at the
moment because I’m focused on training and securing a
national championship. With the help of GCN
training kit and Zwift, I feel I’ll accomplish my
whole year on the bike. – Well, Hank’s chosen this question because he’s gonna buy a pair of skates, and wants you to pick
him up at the airport ’cause he’s on the way over.
– Yes, 100%, I can’t wait. – But great work with the cycling, and we are gonna bring
more race-oriented videos this coming, well, these next few months as the season starts to kick off. So stay tuned for those. They’re really gonna help
go into your tactics, positioning, when to make
efforts, that sort of thing. – Yes.
– They’ll be really in-depth, unlike anything that’s been done before. – Yeah, we’re actually
quite excited to put some of our knowledge that
we’ve learned through racing, and put them into video
forms so you can use the tips and tricks we
used when we were racing. – And good luck this year. Next up is Charlie Pilkington with, now that more pro teams
are using disc brakes, what do you see as the next
step in improving them? Easier to maintain,
swap wheels, et cetera? – Oh, that’s such an interesting question, and I’m gonna go straight
to it with lighter. I reckon they’re gonna
start making disc brakes that are a lot lighter and
also industry standard. So the standard that
goes across the board, so everyone’s using the same
design and same attributes like rotor thickness,
et cetera, et cetera. – I think you’re right about that, because then if you’re in a race, you need a SRAM rear wheel, doesn’t matter if you end up
with a Campag one, for example. – Exactly, yeah.
– Genius, cool that. – But we’ve also done a video on what we think the 2019 trends will be, and it’s actually me
sitting on an armchair. So check out that one
that’s playing on behind us. Over on the tech channel,
you might have noticed that we’ve got a countdown to
the death of the rim brake. Yes, the point where all new
bikes come out with discs. And this was actually predicted
by an industry insider. Could 2019 be the year that we see every major manufacturer release
new bikes featuring discs? I mean, I think yes. Now time for the–
– Quickfire round. – Yes, first question
is from Hyrum Merino. Any tips on keeping helmets fresh? Mine has developed a smell
and I’ve tried everything from vinegar to Febreze, and
the smell just won’t go away. – Whatever you do,
don’t put vinegar on it. – No, please–
– Nor Febreze. – Don’t put vinegar on it. – I actually tend to
wash mine in the shower, along with everything else. JM Shemaria, I know there
are a lot of variables, but I’m looking to get my
first proper road bike, and I’ve narrowed it
down to three options. Entry-level carbon with Tiagra or Veloce, higher-end aluminum with 105, or a custom-made steel
frame with components from a donor bike, mostly
an early 2000 Campy Record. Any thoughts?
– Right, Chris, this is definitely one for you, mate. – Yeah well, I would actually
go with the carbon one, if you were looking to
upgrade it long-term, ’cause then you start off
with a really good frame that’s gonna be like a contemporary
fame that’ll last well. But if you don’t ever
plan to do any upgrades, I’d go for the aluminum one. – Yeah, I think I probably
would agree with you there. Ricky Lynn, hi, I’m 12 years
old and I’m a junior girl, and I’m starting my first
season of road racing. One of the races I’m doing is a short one. It’s uphill, small flat,
and then a descent. I would do this lap about two times. When should I go hard,
when should I take it easy? Do y’all have any vids to help me out? – That’s a really good question. – And we do have videos
eventually, just not up yet. – Yeah, well I’d go hard on the climb, ’cause you’ll get more
reward for your effort. Simply going hard on the descent is gonna be really difficult–
– It is. – To make up the difference in the time, because everyone has kind of
a similar descending speed, unless it’s mega, mega technical. – And even on the flat,
it’s when you’re sitting on someone’s slipstream,
so sitting on the wheel, you are getting a lot more of
a benefit and it’s 30% easier. So making an effort on the climb is, like Chris says, gonna
make the big differences. – Yeah, save your energy on the flat. Ride the descent to stay
where you are on the punch. – And hit it on the climb!
– Exactly. – Next up, Justin LeSueur comes in with, hi, I a Ritchie Swiss Cross for
both road and gravel riding. I’m looking at going on an overseas tour for around four to five weeks. Wow, that sounds amazing.
– Yeah. – I wish we were going. Where I will be there to carry all my kit, and the ride will be on a
mixture of sealed and gravel. The Swiss Cross does not have any mounting points for racks, et cetera, so I am thinking of getting
a tour-specific bike so I don’t have to alter the Swiss Cross and damage it on the tour. Am I being too precious
about the Swiss Cross? I don’t think you are. – No, I don’t think you are either. I don’t think you can be too precious about your pride and joy.
– You can’t. – If it’s the one bike
that you love the most, then why risk anything happening to it? – Yeah, exactly. So I think we’re both gonna agree on going with that tour-specific bike, where it comes with racks–
– It’ll be less stressful. – And you’re not gonna be worried about it getting hit or banged
when you put it down. – No, exactly, and you can just chill out and enjoy the whole trip
that way, can’t you? – Yeah, exactly. Think of it as a workhorse, would you say? – Yeah, definitely, that’s a good idea. Enjoy, and make sure you
send us some pictures. – Yeah!
– ‘Cause I want to see what that looks like.
– Yeah, me too. – And that’s the end of this
week’s Ask GCN Anything. But don’t forget, if you’d like to get in on next week’s show, then
what do you do, Chris? – You leave a comment in the box below with the hashtag #torqueback for any cycling-related questions. But to be in with a chance of winning a free three months subscription to Zwift, use the hashtag #askgcntraining. – Yeah, and don’t forget
if you did like this video, then give it a big thumbs up. And why don’t you check out this video, where Si and I try to burn
10,000 calories in just one ride. – Horrible. – Mate, it was brutal, I’m telling you. It’s horrendous. – You still look tired now. – I feel tired. I’m not recovered after two weeks. It was brutal.