How Are Custom Painted Mountain Bikes Made? | Orbea MyO From Start To Finish

How Are Custom Painted Mountain Bikes Made? | Orbea MyO From Start To Finish


– Mountain biking is an individual sport, and more than anything, that shows in the bikes we ride. Customizing your component
choice is a start, but getting a fully custom paint job is going the full distance, and it’s getting more and more popular. Some brands even offer it
straight from the factory. So we’re out here in
beautiful Basque Country to visit Orbea and see how they do it on a brand new trail
bike, the Orbea Occam. (light techno music) (powerful music) So, how do you get a custom painted bike? Well, Orbea have been
offering this service on some of their models
for a few years now. Shimano invited us
inside the Orbea factory in northern Spain, near Bilbao. Let’s see exactly how they go from the raw carbon bikes to that fully finished custom bike. (light techno music) Orbea’s MyO program has been around a few years already on road bikes and on mountain bikes, and
this is the brand new Occam. So, what you do is you get
onto the Orbea website, choose the model of bike you want. There it is, there’s the brand new Occam, and basically start getting involved and really customize the bike. The great thing about
this whole MyO process is it is completely free. It’s all the same price as
the standard colored bike. So start off with colors. You can choose a gloss or a matte finish. You can see the difference
there. That’s the matte one. Gloss one, super shiny. Now I’m going to go for the gloss. At the moment it’s fully
stealthed out, all black. Look at all the different
color combinations. It’s just a virtually endless cycle. Metallic Continental Blue. That looks pretty good. Secondary color. So I’ll start messing around with that. You can see down here, it
starts to change color. And you can even look at the
different view of the bike. I reckon that one’s going to
give me a good view of it. There you go. What are you thinking? I’m thinking red. Nice. Logos. For the moment they are black. So if I turn it around there
you can see the difference. That looks pretty good. Well I think I’m going for white. Once you’re done with colors, it even then goes into components so you can start speccing
this bike up exactly as you want it. I’m going to choose Shimano XT. From here you can choose your wheels, your bars, your saddle. All sorts of different things. And even then start
choosing the ergonomics. So, how high do you want the bars, how long do you want the stem. Pretty crazy though the
detail you can go into. Once you’re finished
hit that finish button and your bike is then ordered. It’s going to be custom painted and built, so let’s see how that happens. (computerized glitching) Just walking through the factory
seeing this rack of bikes. See, the bottom here of
these are standard colors and then up here we’ve got some MyO bikes. See some of them have little
custom bits of text on them. That ones going to Spain. This one is one going to Austria. So I’ve walked through the factory. It’s really cool to see all
those bikes being built. There’s some road bikes, mountain
bikes, some secret stuff. And this is the carbon painting facility. Check out the colors going on there. It’s like walking into a spaceship. Let’s take a look at the first step of how these MyO bikes
become someone’s own bike. So this is where the MyO process starts. There is the full carbon Occam, which I think actually
looks pretty cool by itself. And there it is. That is the one I designed earlier. So Laura scanned it with a barcode, all the colors are there. This is my personal bike or
the bike we’re going to build. And this is the first process of really masking the frame off, getting it ready, putting parts into places where you don’t want the paint to go. From the first room, it then passes through some air jets that are sort of a
decontamination process. It gets rid of anything on the frame that could get in the way of the paint. Then it goes in for it’s first layer, which is a primer. This is done as a base layer
to literally prime the frame for the next layers, making sure that paints
will bond properly. It also gives a nice base for the next colors to stand out properly. (powerful music) next the frame will go into the oven to bake and cure the paint. This is done after each
layer is sprayed on. (powerful music) And back through the
jets after baking too. This is also done before and after each of the painting layers, making absolutely sure
there are no contaminates to get in the way of the paint. Now the frame is ready
for its first color. Again, the frame is baked and taken through the cleaning jets. This is when the masking takes place to get it ready for the
next layer of paint. This is where the magic really happens, the different layers of colors really make the frame design come alive. It’s a surprisingly manual process with each of the masking outlines being cut and placed by hand. And it’s further complicated
because each model has it’s own specific decals. It’s amazing the workmanship that goes into each and every frame. Again the frame passes through the jets and in for a second color. (upbeat music) After it’s baked for a third time, it’s on to the decals. These too are done entirely by hand. The sheets of decals are submerged in a warm water bath for a while and then set aside. One by one, they’re placed onto
the frame and squeegeed to get rid of the bubbles underneath. Finally, the clear coat is sprayed on. This one happens to be the gloss finish. A last bake and it’s off to
the space-age inspection room. The lights are particularly strong, to make sure nothing
is hidden on the frame. So the bikes throughout the procedure. This is the final check
after the clear coat. This is a road bike, there, for Harry. These two are mattes, and there it is. There’s the Occam in that gloss finish, ready for assembly. (computerized glitching) (eager music) (computerized glitching) (computerized glitching) So this is the brand new Orbea
Occam in my beautiful colors with the brand new 2020
Shimano XT bolted up. So it’s a hard hidden trail bike. It’s a twenty-niner. It’s a one forty mil travel front and rear head angle of sixty-six, but you can also get this
bike with a one-fifty-four. That’s like an eighty to
sixty-five and a half. Seating angle had to be steepened up a bit to seventy-seven and is
longer so it does fit the category, longer lower, slacker. It’s now a four-fifty mil
reach for the medium frame. I think you definitely see the influences from the Rallon Enduro bike. So it’s actually an asymmetric frame. This brace sits off to the side. I think it looks super cool, it’s a bit like MotoGP in there as well. Also that might get you the
space to fit in a bottle cage. And of course, bikes
are asymmetric anyway. You’ve got a rear mech and
drive chain on that side. The size of the bottle
actually does offset some of that weight to the
lighter side of the bike. (computerized glitching) well, it looks great, even
if I do say so myself, with that paint job but it’s time to ride it. (upbeat techno music) Whoa. (upbeat mystified techno music) Well, thank you very
much to Shimano and Orbea for this chance to come out
here to Basque country to design my very own bike
in GMD colors and ride it. It’s been lots of fun. The bike is looking slightly muddy now, so it
needs a good clean to get back to its shiny gloss finish. So go and check out the Orbea website. Check out the MyO, design
your own is live now. Trying to see if Shimano
Axles vs XT video, check out that fat one. Give a thumbs up if you
like custom paint bikes, and hit that subscribe button.