Has Pro Cycling Training Changed? | GCN Asks The World Tour Coaches

Has Pro Cycling Training Changed? | GCN Asks The World Tour Coaches


– [James] Chris and I have been given access to speak to two
of the best trainers at (speaks foreign language). And in this video, we are
going to be diving deep into the details of how training
has changed over the years. – Yeah, training has changed a lot. Where they used to train with
only heart rate monitors, back 20 years ago, then they started to use power metres as a training tool to quantify their training intensity. From then, there has been a revolution, so everybody from under-22,
since they’re under-22 rider, until all professional cyclists, they now use, they now
train with the power metre. – Yeah, if they see
that they’re improving, if they see that, that this work, then it’s gonna be really
good for the future, for sure that they’re gonna weigh the, they’re gonna find a
way to enjoy, you know, and I think, yeah, to have
fun on the bike is just really really important
for everybody, I will say. And we have to, as a coach, yeah it’s, everybody’s different,
everybody’s individual, and we have to find a way for
different riders to enjoy. Some people can enjoy sharing the training
with another teammate, some people can enjoy I don’t know. If you plan all the training
in different scenarios, or I don’t know, can be totally different. But I think that to have
fun on the bike is really, is really important part of this sport. – And do you set them certain,
certain powers to sit in, or certain zones that they can sit in? On say, a hard ride, they
would sit set it zone five, or an easy ride, zone one? – That is the biggest advantage
as to heart rate monitoring, and this with power metres you can set up a lot of more training zones. Like we have more than 10
training zones to train in. Whereas in heart rates, a
professional cyclist has five or six heart rate zones, but in power, with the power metre, you can design more training zones. Why can you define more? So if you want to do shortened routes, like less than one minute, then there are a lot of possibilities, like 20/40s, 30/30s, 15/30s, or everything less than one minute. You cannot describe, or
prescribe, this training form, in terms of heart rates. You need to use power. – Concrete numbers. – Concrete numbers. Because on this shortened route, there’s a delay in your heart rate, so when you do a net force of lets say five four-minute blocks, your heart rate goes up slowly, but at the end of the block, you’re still, your heart rate is still
going up and up and up. With the power metre, or with power, you know exactly from second one which power or which
intensity you are riding. – And we were just chatting earlier, and you were saying when you
go out scouting for new riders, something you look at is power. So you kinda say to the teams, like how does that go about? How does scouting riders
and looking at power, how does that work? – Yeah, we set up a power
profile for every rider. All riders in our team,
they have a performance ID, like McDonald’s. There’s this passport, they can see their five-seconds value, 10 seconds, 20, 30, one
minute, two minutes, five minutes, 10 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, all in power. And then we benchmark all this data with the WorldTour best numbers. And then you can set up a power profile. – Oh okay, that’s really interesting. – So within the team, yes, we have this performance
ID, this passport, but also for scouting of our new riders, we ask them, or we ask the other managers, their credentials for the
software they are using. So everybody loads up
his training files into for example TrainingPeaks or Today’s Plan. – Everyday without fail. – Everyday, their trainings are online. – I was terrible at
uploading mine. (laughs) – Yeah, yeah some, some. – I don’t think so it has changed a lot. I think 20 years or 30 years ago people were training really really well, and today people is training really well. So I think what it has changed is that now we can monitor our own,
we can control everything. So I think that’s really good part of the coaching or training. But at least in my experience, I can’t feel that training
has changed all a lot. – But now for this scouting, I login in their TrainingPeaks account, and I set up a performance ID,
or a power profile for them, which I then benchmark with
the best WorldTour numbers, and then we see of course
at race results as well. – So is power more important than results? – For me, power is more
important than results when you talk for older under-23 riders, or riders who don’t have
experience on a WorldTour level. If you are scouting a
rider who has already, who has rode a lot on
pro continental level, and you want them to
ride in a WorldTour team, the numbers, power, the power of the– – [James] It’s important. – [Wim] Yeah it is important, yeah. – Do you have one favourite bit
of advice that you’d offer to a young rider, you know, 17 to 22, that’s maybe hoping to become competitive? What would you advise them to do? – Yeah maybe, this is a
really important age range, because a lot of people ask me, I’ve got a son who is doing
cycling, and what he should do? And I always say, enjoy, he has to enjoy. He doesn’t need to, I don’t know, to do really strict training programme, or I don’t know, follow
really strict advices or, just share the training with teammates. Just enjoy, just I don’t know. Then it’s time to be serious, and time to try to develop and improve. But I think from 17 to 22, 23 or so is really important part
of the cyclist’s careers where they have to at least know if they want to be
professional riders or not. – [James] So we hope
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