Hardtail Or Full Suspension Mountain Bike? | Ask GMBN Anything About Mountain Biking

Hardtail Or Full Suspension Mountain Bike? | Ask GMBN Anything About Mountain Biking


– Welcome to Ask GMBN, the
weekly show where we answer all your mountain bike
questions that we receive in the comments section below
our videos through the #AskGMBN.com and on email at [email protected] So let’s get into it with
this week’s first question from Dominykas Vencius, who says, “I’m planning to buy a new bike.” That’s great news. “Should I buy hardtail or full sus? I like going off road and
downhill but I’m not an extremal.” I guess by extremal you
mean you don’t go too crazy. I would suggest buying the best bike you can afford in your budget. But your next question does go on to say that you’d like to fit a dual crown fork, which makes me think that
you are looking at some more extreme riding, some jumps
and maybe some tougher trails. So maybe go with the most cost-effective choice you’ve got in the
full sus range because you’re gonna have a lot
of fun out of that bike and lots of range of what you can try. So that would be my suggestion. Hope it helps and look forward
to hearing what you get. Next question is from Andrew Cooke. “Do you guys have any tips on reducing wind noise on POV videos?” Well, one thing you can
do is think about where you’re positioning the camera, because if you put the
camera on top of your helmet, it’s gonna be very exposed and
you get lots of wind noise, whereas if you put the
camera on your chest mount, it’s gonna be in your riding cockpit and a little bit more protected. Your other option would
be to fit an external mic that you could put a wind
sock on and protect that. So those are your options, really. Wind noise can be a tricky
one to get away with, especially if you’re
going very very quick, which is what we wanna see. Other thing you could possibly do is not worry about that audio too much and put a great soundtrack over your video once you’ve taken it
through the edit suite. So if you do that, make
sure you send us the video so we can take a look. Jude Hatton-Holland says, “Hi guys, are there any
mountain bikers on Strava?” Well yes, there is and your
question is followed up for us in the comments section by SGMTB who says, “Apparently there are but
I can’t understand how.” Well, why don’t we take a look at our Five ways to find new
mountain bike trails video that Mark and Neil did a few months back where they took a look at
Strava and how you can use it. – Apps like Strava and Garmin Connect are route-mapping tools that people use to map exactly where they’ve been riding. So you can use those to
actually have a look, search the areas you want to ride, and the busiest segments are
often the best riding spots. – Next question coming
in from Fynn Watson says, “Hi guys. How do I set up my enduro bike for an urban downhill?” Now what I wanna say here
is, that’s a common mistake to think about how you’re
setting up the bike for a different type of race. What you should be thinking about is how you’re setting up your bike for each individual day you’re riding. So an urban downhill
won’t necessarily have a different set-up to an enduro because what are you basing enduro on? Basically, that could be
any terrain of any kind. So the best thing you can do when you’re going to a race is look at the course, think about those obstacles
that you’re hitting and how they relate to
what you ride usually, and then if it’s more
extreme, then you need to start setting up the bike
for a more extreme terrain. So don’t think urban, don’t think enduro, think about the course itself. Next question from thetoshiba86: “I’ve greased every
part of my mountain bike but that damn annoying squeak
just keeps on happening. How do I find it?” There could be things like
hairline fractures in your frame or maybe something really
simple like your seat post. That’s a really common one. A lot of people can’t
find a creak on their bike because they’re looking
at all the moving parts and the things they’re pulling and pushing and all they needed to do
was put a tiny bit of grease on their seat post and voila, it’s gone. So maybe try that one, that’s
caught me out a few times. Other option, if you can’t find it at all, is just spray a tiny little
bit of WD on things like your handlebar stem mounting
and the seat post itself just to see if it goes away
for a short period of time and then you know you’ve
found your culprit. Good luck finding it, it can be annoying when you can’t find that one little creak that’s making your bike feel not quite as smooth as it should. Noah S. Says, “Is Kashima
coating on forks and rear suspension worth the cost?” Yeah, it is! It’s an easy answer. It makes your shock much more fluid and it also looks really great. I love a Kashima coating
on a fork and a shock. So I would always say it’s worth the cost. Jojolapompa says, “Can you damage your fork
if you bottom out too often? I ride an XC bike with 80mm of travel and correct sag adjustment,
but the train here in the Southeast of France can be a bit rocky.” Well, yeah, obviously if you’re
bottoming out all the time it is gonna have more wear and
tear on your fork than normal but forks are designed to
be very robust these days, so maybe try putting a little
bit more air into your fork and seeing if that affects it. And maybe you just need
to start looking at longer travel bikes. You might just be going a
bit too extreme for that travel distance. Could be it. Could be too good. Tyler Evans, “Can you guys make a video on how to make a rear mud guard?” Well I’m sure we can;
this one sounds like a mechanical video for Scott. It’s such a great suggestion. Let’s just take a look at
his skills on how he made a mud guard recently in the workshop and see if we can put him to the test with your new idea for a real one. – Now you guys will all know
from watching the videos on GMBN, we absolutely love a hack, and nothing beats a free
one, and in this video, we’re going to show you
how to make a mud guard. This template that I’m drawing up will be in the description down below. And all you’re gonna need
for it is a two litre bottle. – Great questions this week. Our next one is from Ayden Thomas. “Why do you guys wear baggies? I’ve worn spandex and baggies,
and spandex is more comfy.” Okay by spandex, I
guess you mean Lycra XC. Well you’d be wearing XC
because you want to go fast. It’s lightweight, streamlined. You’d be wearing baggies
because you want to get pads underneath, if
you want to have a bit more freedom in your movement
because you’re doing maybe more enduro riding. I like baggies because
I think they look cool. I know that Blake has
just bought some Lycra because he’s going to be
doing some road riding, and he can’t wait to put it on. So at the end of the day,
you’ve answered the question, because you’re most comfy in Lycra. So whatever works, but I’m a baggies man. I’ve got to be honest. Although here is a video out
there of me wearing some Lycra. Next question is from
Daniel Gregerson, who says, “Is changing the head
tube angle from 68 to 66 just enough or too little?” Well it’s a really hard
question to answer because I don’t know what bike
you’re talking about. Let’s say that you’re
thinking about riding a slightly more relaxed head
angle because you want to ride trails with a more modern geometry. What I can tell you is
going from 68 to 66, you’re gonna notice a big difference, whatever you’re using it for, or if you’re looking
between two different bikes with that much difference. It doesn’t sound a lot, but a
bike will perform in corners really, really differently and definitely take the train on in a different way with just that small adjustment
in the head angle. So, try the two bikes that
you’re thinking about. Or if you’ve got a bike
that’s got a head set that is adjustable, you can try different
angles then play with it because you are going to
notice a big difference even on just two degrees. James Walters is asking, “Have
you heard of riders using different wheel sizes on the same bike? Could you explore this idea?” I haven’t heard of any riders
using different wheel sizes front and back on a bike that
hasn’t been designed for it. Back in the day there was a
Specialised free ride bike that did have a 24″ rear
wheel and a 26″ front wheel. I know that Specialised dropped that idea, so I don’t know if it’s
because it didn’t work or it didn’t look cool
or people didn’t really buy into the idea. But haven’t heard of
any top pros or anything experimenting with different
wheel sizes on the same bikes. Interesting and maybe it’s
something we should look at. Could be a bit of fun, especially
playing with 27.5 and 29s. So yes, nice idea. Jolliehallbmx, “How do you become a pro and get sponsored for mountain biking?” Well, it’s a question we get asked a lot, and this is a great
opportunity to throw to a video where we did an ask the pros,
“How do you get sponsored?” So let’s take a look. – It wasn’t in my plan to become a pro, to ride as a job, but it
just helped me to find a way to ride for cheaper and then
for free, and then for money. So step by step. – Right, quick fire round. It’s time to get helmeted
up, because this bit could be dangerous. First question is Tuomas Kuusisto says, “When is Neil going to drop his own edit, like a ride your fat bike film?” That’s a great idea; soon, I hope. Caesius says, “Are you
going to Saalbach this year, and are you going to
visit the nearby glacier of Kitzteinhorn?” Mike, are we going to Saalbach? – [Mike] Yes we are. – Yes. We are. Spiderkid200, “What is the hardest trick that you guys can do?” This question is for
Blake, he’s specified. Blake’s best trick is probably a flipwhip, back flip with a tail whip in it. He’s pretty good at those. Zigmund Marchan says,
“Is a fat bike considered a mountain bike?” Yes. That is a rude question, Zigmund. I can’t believe you’ve asked it. Breno Ferreira says, “Can
you guys make a video of falls and balls only with you in it?” Yes. We fall off a lot;
we could do that easily. The McBike Show says, “What happened to all of Scotty’s bikes?” Well, presenting his
bikes, we’re lucky to be supported by some great brand partners. They like to keep us up
to date on the new models, so when we’re finished with the
bikes, they go back to them, so we get to ride some
great bikes thanks to the brands that support us. Mike Jeskin says, “Is it
okay to have my seat in the middle position so it isn’t
impossible to pedal uphill and I have it out of the
way on the descents?” Yes, it’s okay, but
what I would say to you is dropper post. Try it; it’ll change your life. Jeffrey Irvin, “What shoes does Neil have, and how much do they cost?” I’ve never bought Neil any
shoes, but I do know that he just got a new pair of
Northwaves, which he loves. So I think it might be those
that you’re talking about. Northwaves. Check them out. Joshua Fresnoza says, “What are
the pros and cons of 29ers?” Man, Joshua, that is not
a quick fire question. Time for Correct Me If I’m Wrong. Love this bit, seeing some
videos of you guys riding. We’re starting with this
one from Cameron Anderson, who is in Ocean Grove in Australia doing some tricks, 360s
out on the skate park, which is really cool. Just take a quick look. He’s asking, this is his first 360 and what is he doing wrong? Well he’s coming into it lovely. He’s got great spin. It all looks good. He’s gonna get 360. Or 270. Well you know what, Cameron,
it looks great actually. The one thing I would
say is you start the spin really great looking over your shoulder. That twists your shoulders
and then alternately twists your hips and
keeps you spinning round. But once you start to
spin, you stop looking, and you start looking to
where you’ve come from. What I’m wanting you to
do is spot your landing. That will give you a little bit more spin. It will keep you spinning round. And you’ll ride it out a bit. The landing point is great;
you don’t necessarily need any more, but you
probably will get a bit more if you keep that look going
to where you want to go. So don’t get distracted by the
ramp you’ve just come out of. But great first effort. Can’t wait to see what
your next trick’s gonna be. Next video from Correct
Me If I’m Wrong is from Mason Gallagher, Mason Gallagher. And all he wants is more air. Let’s take a look at what he’s got. He’s coming in; oh he’s
got a GMBN shirt on. Everything’s right. You’re getting good air,
you’re getting good air, but if you want more air, then you know what you need to work on is the jump itself. Not your jump in
technique; the actual dirt that you’re building. So take a look at your ramp. The one that you’ve got is really short, more of a kicker ramp. You’re going to get a nice bit
of height like you’re getting and a little bit of distance, but, if you really bring that ramp up into a much bigger size, then
you’re about two feet there, you want to go up to, say,
like, four feet and beyond, big long takeoff, you’re
going to get lots of air. Obviously you need a landing
ramp that suits the takeoff. But that’s where you need to go next, you need to start
hitting some bigger jumps with bigger, longer takeoffs, and you’re going to be having a lot of fun. Great Correct Me If I’m Wrongs. Great show; thanks for your questions. Keep them coming with that #AskGMBN, and you can leave them down
in the comments section down below this very video. And also by email, you can
send them to [email protected] If you want to subscribe to the channel, and why wouldn’t you? You get a brand new video
every day of the week. Click on the logo just here. If you click over here,
you’re going to see our Pop Factory tour, which is really cool. It’s great to meet those guys. And over here, you can see our What is Dirt Jumping
video, where you can learn lots of skills from
Blake Bing-Bong Sampson. Keep those questions coming. Thanks for watching. Give us a thumbs up like
and I’ll see you next time.