GCN’s Essential French Cycling Phrases Vol. 1 | Tour de France 2018

GCN’s Essential French Cycling Phrases Vol. 1 | Tour de France 2018


(Accordian music) – It’s Tour de France time, and whether you call it Tour de France or Tour de France, there is no escaping this iconic race and the magical pull
it has for cycling fans and even, frankly, non cycling fans. One thing that is also
inescapable is the influence of Tour de France has had
on the language of cycling. France is a historical
influence on the sport. It means that French is
part of the vocabulary of cycling in all languages. So (speaks in foreign language) DS, which means (speaks
in foreign language) (speaks in foreign
language), which comes from Grand Prix Montagne, or even chammy, which comes
from the French chamois, meaning the chammy goat leathers used in the pads of cycling shorts, which actually is a bit gross, isn’t it? Anyway, everyone knows these words. In fact, we almost don’t
notice them anymore. But if you want to raise your
Tour de France watching game, you need to be able to
(speaks in foreign language) a little bit better than that. Nothing adds to your cachet as an astute observer of the Tour than being able to drop in a few (speaks in foreign language). So here, ready for the
2018 Tour de France, we bring you some cycling-specific (speaks in foreign language) that will help you sound
like a true connoisseur of the sport. Let’s start with the most
important word of all, (speaks in foreign language). (speaks in foreign language) means jersey, so the (speaks in foreign language) is the yellow jersey. (speaks in foreign language) is the sprinter’s green jersey. (speaks in foreign language)
is the polka-dot jersey, which actually could be translated as the jersey with the red peas because peas and polka dots are actually the same word in French. (speaks in foreign language), to show off the jersey. But here we’re talking
about the sponsor’s jersey from the pro team, rather
than a race leader jersey. This refers to the tactic of
attacking to make a solo break early in the stage simply
in order to get TV time. And often we have no hope of winning, so that the sponsor’s jersey is seen by as many people as possible. (speaks in foreign language) Literally, the escape. Means the break (speaks in foreign language) there’s a whole list of terms used to describe types of rider. Now, (speaks in foreign language) is commonly heard in English, and it means a good all-arounder. A (speaks in foreign
language) is a punchy racer who specializes in rolling terrain but short but steep climbs. A (speaks in foreign language)
means literally a fighter, one who makes a valiant last stand. So in cycling, it’s a rider who goes on
heroic solo breakaways. A (speaks in foreign
language) is a climber, and, of course, a (speaks in
foreign language) is a sprinter (speaks in foreign language)
is to crush or mash the pedals to put in a huge effort in a big gear. (speaks in foreign language) Literally, doing the border. It means putting the peloton in the gutter in a crosswind. (speaks in foreign language) Literally, potato hunt. This is what in English we would call being in no-man’s land. The rider who is between two groups, having escaped from the peloton but who can’t quite reach
the breakaway ahead. Stuck in the middle, all on their own, chasing the breakaway, hunting potatoes, obviously. (speaks in foreign language) A (speaks in foreign
language) is a pall breaker. It means a course of the race where the terrain is
continuously up and down, false flats, corners,
difficult, demanding, and requires a lot of
concentration from the riders and very few opportunities to recover. (speaks in foreign language) Literally, packaging is the
slang for a bunched sprint, and is also sometimes called a
(speaks in foreign language), as in rush in English. (speaks in foreign language) Literally, the pilot fish. The final lead-out rider of the sprint who brings the sprint as
close to the line as possible to drop then off in the optimal
position to win the race. (speaks in foreign language) A bicycle salad. No, no, it’s not the low-calorie diet of a professional cyclist. And, to be honest, at the Tour, they have to eat an awful lot of calories just to get ’round. But actually, this means
a crash in the bunch with a tangle of bicycles. It’s actually a phrase you
don’t really want to hear. Voila. Let’s hope that this helps
you sound like a true expert or connoisseur of the Tour and impress your friends
with your linguistic cycling (speaks in foreign language). (speaks in foreign
language) to give us a Like, and click here to see more of
GCN’s Tour de France content.