GCN’s Cheap Bike To Super Bike Upgrade Challenge – The Finished Bicycle!

GCN’s Cheap Bike To Super Bike Upgrade Challenge – The Finished Bicycle!


– The moment you’ve all been waiting for. The GCN Cheap Bike, which I’ve
gradually been transforming into something which
hopefully is going to resemble a Super Bike in terms of performance. But hey, I’ve got Chris Opie
to do that tough work for me. But many of you will remember how this bike started its life. It began as a Trek road bike that I bought off of eBay for 260 pounds, that was simply advertised
as a Lance Armstrong replica. Let’s have a close look
at what I’ve done to it. (snappy upbeat music) Let’s start with the frame then, shall we? Well it’s an aluminium frame
and it’s size 57 centimeters. The original paintwork and
loads of you will remember, it was that United States Postal Service, just like what Lance rode
back in the early 2000s. Well that just had to go didn’t it? We wanted to change it. So I asked some of my fellow presenters, how shall I paint it? And they told me. So I decided to do that, and well, I was waiting for that
phone call from Oliver. – What is the last paint job
that the viewers, or anyone, is gonna expect you to put on a bike? Whatever that is, do that. – So that’s how it ended up in this, well, rather resplendent
looking Celestial colorway. So I decided to do that, and thanks to the folks at spray.bike who sent me some cans of spray paint. And well the results, I have to admit I’m pretty
pleased with it to be honest. If I had more time I definitely would have
sanded it down more and more, just to get it ultra smooth. But well, for the money,
seven pounds 99 per can, it’s certainly not bad. Then came the decals, as well as a final coat
of lacquer on there, and to be honest, I’m impressed. Let’s talk about the cockpit then. Well, I opted for the Deda Zero Seatpost, stem, and handlebars, purely
’cause I thought the black would really look great
against the Celestial colorway. And I’m sure you agree, I’m
not wrong with that am I? So seatpost, that’s a
size 27.2 millimeter, and the stem, that’s 120
millimeters in length. Bars, 42 centimeters
wide, and as you can see, they’re kind of a
semi-compact style design, so they’re pretty shallow there, so when Chris is up battling his PB, he won’t be giving himself a sore back. Now, the eagle-eyed of you at this point will probably notice that
in one of my previous videos I mentioned about the barrel
adjuster here on the down tube, and the thread in it was,
well virtually non-existent. So whilst building it
up, I thought to myself, I’m gonna have that wound all the way in, so I don’t risk pulling it out whatsoever, and then fit an inline
barrel adjuster here on the front derailleur cable. So that just went on nice and easy, and it’s gonna give me just
that bit of fine tuning there for the front derailleur,
should I need it. Whilst we’re at the front end, let’s talk about the shifters. Shimano 105 5800, and they
are so light in their action compared to the originals
that were on there. You’ll remember as well, they have the old external
cables poking out of there, the Flight Deck buttons and all that. None of that anymore, it’s
all hidden away nicely. And then finally the bars, well they’re wrapped off in
some LifeLine handlebar tape. I do like it, it’s got a
slight silicone feel to it so it’s nice and grippy there too. Right, let’s move on to the wheels then. We’ve got a pair of Vision Team 30s, and I’m sure you’ll agree
they look fantastic. And loads of people in the office, when I wheeled this bike through, actually asked me what they
were and how much they cost, and simply couldn’t believe it. That’s how impressed they were. They come with seal bearings, we’ve also got bladed spokes here too, and importantly, external nipples. Because if you were to
have to true them up, well you don’t have to take off your rim tape, your
tires and all that jazz. So it’s super impressive to get that for such a bargain price. Tires, we’ve got a pair
of Continental GP 4000s, in a 25 millimeter width. A certain upgrade over
those old Michelin ones that were on there that
came in a 23 millimeter. They would definitely be a
pair of bone shaker tires if I had to ride that bike. And then actually, one of the
components on the wheel set is one of the only bits
which I managed to salvage on this bike from the original one. And that is the inner tubes. They were all in great condition, so I was happy to be able to reuse those. Oh, and I got the Vision
skewers included too. All right, let’s talk
about the groupset then. Because I managed to get
this as a complete item, but there was a few changes
from the full 105 groupset which I initially thought
I was gonna be getting. So whilst the brakes
were a slight downgrade from the 105 5800, I did get a pair of Shimano R561 calipers. So similar really to the original bike that came with a full 105 groupset, yet the brakes on there were Tiagra. So it’s a pretty similar
comparison to make. And that rear derailleur, as you can see, is standard short-cage rear mech. It does manage to accommodate, though, that 11 to 28 cassette there on the rear. Then the chainset, I’ve opted for 170
millimeter length cranks and a 53/39 chainring combination. The reason being that’s exactly the same as what came on the original bike, so I thought, well let’s
replace like for like, or as close as possible. Now something else that was different from the original 5800 groupset was actually this front derailleur. So it’s an Ultegra 6800 Braze-On one. Now the shop, when I bought it from them, they just didn’t have the 5800, so they upgraded that one for me. And I think that’s good because it’s a nice
light-action front derailleur. Admittedly, you don’t use
the front mech that often. But when you do, you wanna
make sure it’s nice and easy and there’s no strain there whatsoever. Then also the bottom bracket,
that was exactly the same too. They managed to upgrade that from the 105 to the Ultegra version. And it is also that
newer Hollowtech style. So you remember the original one that had the Octalink chainset on there, those bottom brackets weighed an awful lot compared to the actual overall weight of the chainset and bottom
bracket on this bike, because you’re using a hollow spindle, and it’s a much more slimline affair. Particularly, the fact that
the actual external cups there are almost the same diameter
as the bottom bracket shell. Something which I’m a big fan of compared to the original
Hollowtech bottom brackets that were released. Now the chain itself, that’s
not Shimano 105 either. Instead, it’s a KMC 11EL model. That stands for extra-light because it’s got
considerable weight savings, so it only weighs about 245 grams. And they’ve come to save some weight thanks to the slotted-out sides here on the links of each individual piece. Right, but what actually remains then from the original bike? Well, other than the frame and the forks, we’ve got the seat clamp
here, which was a BBB one. Well let’s believe it
was an aftermarket one when I bought the bike from Johnny. And also the headset here. Luckily those bearings
were in perfect condition. Now the bike, it has
been set up for Mr. Opie, but I’m sure he will
fiddle around with this. But don’t worry, I’m gonna change these silver headset
spacers to some black ones which I’ve got kicking about at home. Because it uses an old one
inch diameter steerer here, I didn’t have any in the
workshop at the GCN offices to actually fit on the bike. So I’m gonna have to go back to my own personal stash, aren’t I? Then I’ve got the GCN
headset top cap cover there, just to finish it off and look nice. And fitted on to the seat
post we’ve got a Fizik Arione, and it’s got the carbon braided rails so we’re saving a little
bit of weight there, but not sacrificing comfort whatsoever. It’s my favorite saddle, that. And the weight of the bike,
it’s coming in at 9.02 kilos. The original bike, that
weighed in at 9.85. Pretty good weight saving. Oh, you didn’t think
I was gonna let you go without hearing the freehub did you? Let’s have a listen. (wheel clicking softly) Ahh nice, that’s quite old school. There we are, the GCN Cheap Bike. Let me know what you think of it, down there in the comment section below. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed
building this bike up. So much, I want to do another series. So let me know what you’d like
to see me build or restore, down there in the comment section below. Don’t forget too, to like and share this
video with your friends. Give it a big old thumbs-up. And also, why not check out how it got on since it’s been pimped up, just down here. And for the complete series of this bike and the transformation,
click just down here.