GCN Tech Unboxing: Orbea Orca Aero Disc

GCN Tech Unboxing: Orbea Orca Aero Disc


(soft music) (dramatic swooshes) – We’re back for another GCN Tech unboxing and this one is a biggy. No, not because it’s my first one, but because we’re
unboxing a brand new bike from our partners, Orbea. Inside this box is a brand
new Orbea Orca Aero Disc and as ever, because this
is a GCN Tech unboxing, you have a chance to win one. But not this one, because
we’re offering you the chance to win one with a
completely custom paint job designed by you using Orbea’s MyO scheme. How awesome is that? A completely customised Orbea Orca Aero. Thanks to Orbea for that, but I think we’re too good to you guys. If you want a chance to win, then stay tuned to the end of the videos for the details will be there. But for now, let’s crack on and just get it out this
box and see what we’ve got. (jazz music) (plastic snaps) (smacks seat) Over the last three years
the UCI has been testing the use of disc brakes
in professional racing and as of July the first, this
year, they gave the all clear for disc brakes to be used
widespread in pro racing. And a lot of manufacturers
have got behind this decision and have started releasing pro race bikes with disc brakes on them. The Orbea Orca Aero disc is one of the latest examples of that. Now Orbea, following this
rule change, has brought out both of it’s top end race
bikes in disc brake version, so the Orbea Orca Climbing Bike and the Orbea Orca Aero, we’ve got here. So many of you may be familiar
with the previous version, well the non-disc version,
the Orbea Orca Aero and the disc version shares
the same platform as that bike, which was launched to
great acclaim last year. So, without further ado,
let’s get into the tech specs of the new Orbea Orca Aero
discs starting up front. (soft jazz music) The first difference is
that you’ve got a rotor and a disc brake calliper
instead of the normal direct mount brake that’s
found on the non-disc version. But both versions do share the
same free-flow fork profile, which according to Orbea,
can save four watts, at 50 kilometres an
hour, over 50 kilometres, which can equate to 8.4 seconds saved. Now, admittedly this
might not sound like much, but races are regularly
won by much smaller margins and it’s certainly gonna keep you fresher if you’re riding all day
and then you’re coming to the town sign sprint and
tryin’ to beat your mates. So, something I’d definitely
take and out on the road, it is actually noticeable as well. Moving backwards into the frame, the Orca Aero uses Kamm-tail
style tube profiles and there’s a number of reasons for this. They’re used on quite a lot of
Aero bike designs these days and by removing the back part, this pointed section, of an Aero foil, you can actually save some
weight within the frame. But also having that flat
back to the tube means that when you’ve got a
water bottle attached, the air flow can be softened
over the water bottle as well, which helps reduce drag. Overall, with all the
Aero features combined, Orbea claims that the
Orca Aero saves 27 watts over the standard Orca and it reckons that this would equate to
one minute 22 seconds faster over 50 kilometres at
50 kilometres an hour. Now, that’s massive. Sign me up right now. The Orca Aero disc is
said to have the same impressive stiffness characteristics
as the Rim Brake model. This really is a bike for the sprinters and those of you who can
drop massive watt bombs. Admittedly that’s, that’s not me, but Chris Opie is a
massive fan of this bike. And it’s pretty impressive as well, because the first sort of
generation of Aero road bikes primarily focused on aerodynamics and this meant that they
could be a bit compromised with regards to stiffness and feel a little bit
like cooked spaghetti. But in making the bike really stiff, Orbea hasn’t compromised
the weight of the bike. Say, the frame weighs 1,150 grammes, which for this kind of bike
is seriously impressive. Another way that Orbea
makes the Orca Aero so fast is through integration, so you’ve got really nice Aero spacers
in this top cap here and also the oval seat
column, which is really neat, but also really functional
with the bolt there. And you’ve got the DI tube junction box nicely integrated into the frame. And another system, which
is what Orbea calls MMS, which is Multi-Mount System. Now, that refers to the way that you can mount the
bottles on the frame. So depending on how many
bottles you’re using, the size of the frame, the
optimum aerodynamic position for the bottle can be different. So by having three bolts on the down tube, you can alter where you put your bottle. Now I know what you’re all screaming at the screen right now. How do I win one? Well, it’s really simple. Simply click on the link below, where you’ll be taken to our giveaway page and on that page, you’ll find
all the details you need. And then, why not head
over to Orbea’s website where you can have a play
with the MyO customizer so that you’ll be ready to say exactly what paint job
you want if you win? I wonder what would be the
best paint job for this bike? Hmm, maybe let us know in
the comment section below and good luck.
(fast swoosh) Once you’ve entered and
finished playing around with paint job options, why
not watch another video? Maybe something from the Tour
De France, so click here.