From Gravel To Track – The Next Big Thing In Cycling? | The Cycling Race News Show

From Gravel To Track – The Next Big Thing In Cycling? | The Cycling Race News Show


This week on the GCN Racing News Show, we
look at how Ashton Lambie absolutely SMASHED the individual pursuit world record. Things hot up, literally, at the Vuelta a
Espana, we’ve also got the Boels Ladies Tour, and a look into the ultra endurance
world with the Race to the Rock, Oh, and quick disclosure, today I will mostly
be imitating anchor man, reading out everything that Dan Lloyd has written for me. Before we start proper – a quick reminder
to head over to our Facebook page to get your racing fix. This week we’ll continue to do highlights
and analysis of each stage of the Vuelta a Espana, plus daily highlights of the Tour
of Britain, AND, love coverage of the GP’s of Quebec and Montreal – make sure you head
over to our GCN Cycling page on Facebook for all of that. Now, let’s start with this quite incredible
world individual pursuit world record. In 1996, Chris Boardman set the time of four
minutes and eleven seconds, but since he did that while adopting the superman position,
which was subsequently banned, many though that it would never be broken. But then, 7 years ago, in 2011, Jack Bobridge
bettered that time by just over half a second. And that’s where it stayed, until Friday
that is, when the relative unknown, Ashton Lambie of the USA, lopped a whopping 3 seconds
off the record, completing the 4km event at the Pan American Championships in a little
over four minutes and seven seconds. He then back that up with a 4:09 in the final,
so all of a sudden, Ashton Lambie has ridden the two fastest Individual Pursuits ever,
quite remarkable. Now, to put that into perspective, that’s
an average speed of 58.3kph, from a standing start, and at his peak, he did a 14.4 second
lap, a speed of 62.5kph, or 38.8mph. As ever, Xavier Disley has made an illuminating
visual of this ride. It was done at the Aguascalientes velodrome
in Mexico, which as you’ll probably know is at altitude, and according to Xavier, starting
out fast and then trying to hang on is a good tactic to employ at altitude, as the lower
air density reduces the deceleration compared to sea level. If you’ve never heard of Lambie, and we
have to admit we hadn’t before his astonish ride – his back story is an interesting one. He started out riding gravel events in Kansas,
setting several records in the area and finishing in the top 10 at the Dirty Kanza. Soon after he would transition to grass track
racing in a corn field, and now, just two years later, he’s a world record holder. congratulate Lambie on his success and make
him this week’s GCN Rider Of The Week. Back onto the road now, the field where Dan
Lloyd is frankly a demiGod. As we mentioned in our intro, things have
been hotting up in more ways than one at the Vuelta a Espana. Temperatures hit over 40 degrees on a couple
of the stages, and it’s that, almost more than the terrain which has made the first
week particularly tough. In winning stage 8 by outsprinting Peter Sagan,
Alejandro Valverde made it two stage wins from 8, increasing his career tally to 11,
with a total of 96 top 10 placings on Vuelta stages, but possibly even more impressive
than that is the fact that the last time Valverde finished outside the top 50 of a bike race
was two and a half years ago. Valverde had, however, missed out on an opportunity
to take the leader’s jersey back on stage 4, which saw Ben King emerge victorious with
a stinging sprint at the end of the climb. Behind, Simon Yates was back to his attacking
self, stealing almost 30s from most of the other GC favourites, something that, according
to teammate Jack Haig, wasn’t part of the plan. Haha ‘you’re supposed to keep a bloody
lid on it mate!’. Well I, for one, hope that Simon Yates continues
to struggle to keep a lid on it, there’s no doubt he makes races much more exciting. The Vuelta has also seen a number of nasty
crashes, and so all things considered, it’s quite incredible that it wasn’t until stage
8 that we got our first abandon – Maurits Lammertink. Quite incredible given that Tiesj Benoot crashed
on stage 7 and lost half his knee, look away if you’re squeamish. OUCH! Julian Duval was amongst a number of riders
who were taken down just after the finish line on stage 6, after a race helicopter blew
some barriers into their path, clearly shown by this video taken by Rushverde on twitter. Loic Chetout found himself quite exposed to
the elements on stage 9 Whilst Ian Boswell has been managing to get
through despite a nasty crash on stage 4. We often talk about what a hardy bunch pro
cyclists are, but it’s been as evident as ever at this year’s race. Today is the first rest day of the race, and
as things stand, Simon Yates holds a slender one second advantage over Alejandro Valverde,
with Quintana a further 13s back, but the entire top ten still only separated by 48
seconds. Ben King became king of the Covatilla on stage
9, pushing himself almost beyond his limits to take his 2nd stage win of the race. Here’s what he had
to say after. The Tour of Britain kicked off yesterday and saw the return
to competition of Geraint Thomas and Chris Froome, both of whom looked, well, like they’d
piled on a few pounds since July. Probably a marginal gain given how flat the
UK is and how bad the weather… Stage 1 was expected to finish in a bunch
sprint, and although Julian Alaphilippe and Bob Jungels attempted to rip up the script,
attacking on the small climb which came in the last 10km’s, they were ultimately brought
back. Gaviria launched first, but Greipel muscled
his way past and just held off Caleb Ewan for the win. It was almost like he was sending a not so
subliminal message to his team, Lotto Soudal, who have have replaced Greipel with Ewan as
their main sprinter for the next few years. Annemiek Van Vleuten made no secret of her
form as the World Championships loom – she comfortably won the prologue of the Boels
Ladies Tour and then soloed to victory on stage 1. That, despite taking a wrong turn on the final
descent and losing most of her lead. Not to be outdone, former world champion Amalie
Dideriksen also went back to back, sprinting to victory on stages 3 and 4, whilst her Boels
Dolmans teammate and current world champion Chantal Blaak continued the team’s success
the following day around the hills of Limburg. They couldn’t worry Van Vleuten, though,
who carried an 18 second advantage over Lucinda Brand into the final day’s TT, which she
would extend to 52 seconds after taking a third stage win. 2nd place overall would go to Ellen Van Dijk
after her teammate Brand crashed on that final day. Over to the ultra endurance world now where
we shall start with the Race to the Rock – a solo, unsupported mainly off road based race
to Uluru, a massive sandstone Monolith. This year’s event started in Cockle Creek
in Tasmania, at 6:22am on the 1st of September. Conditions were far from ideal in Tasmania,
where the riders had to cope with the cold, the rain and even the snow as they went onto
the central plateau on day 2. Only Emma Flukes and Sarah Hammond braved
that section as the snow was falling, and it really was brave, with temperatures down
to -8 degrees C. After missing the ferry, Sarah and Adam Lana
caught a flight to Melbourne and resumed their ride there, whilst Emma missed it and fell
behind. Sarah has won this race for the last two years,
and as things stand she’s almost 40km’s in front of Adam, but with with over 3000km
still to cover, there’s a hell of a long way still to go! She really is a legend in the world of ultra
endurance, and cycling in general. OK – that’s all for this week, next week
we’ll have an update on the race to the rock, the 2nd week of the Vuelta, the GP’s
of Quebec and Montreal, and the Tour of Britain. We’ll see you then.