Four Cycling Training Workouts To Build Power On Short Climbs

Four Cycling Training Workouts To Build Power On Short Climbs


– Coming up, are four training sessions to help you power up short climbs. It’s pretty intense, so make
sure you get warmed up first. (techno music) – The first session
works on the basis that the more speed you carry
into and up the first part of a steep climb,
the faster you’re gonna get up it, even if you do begin to fade. For this session, we’re
going to do eight intervals on a climb that lasts about a minute. The steeper the climb, the better. Start each one with a 10 second sprint out of the saddle, then
hold on as best as you can until the top, or your
imaginary finish line. And don’t worry if your
power or speed fades, in fact, if you do this
properly, it should. Take a good three or
four minutes of recovery, easy, between each one, and a nice long cool down at the end. – This one is a bit of a classic, and it’s designed to increase
your power at VO2 Max. So you’ll power, for about
five minutes, in duration. It’s preferable, of course, to do this on a five minute climb if you have one near you. And it really is very simple. After your warm-up, you’re going to do six lots of five minute
efforts on the climb. For this set of intervals, though, you’ll want to try and pace things to keep your power fairly even throughout each five-minute interval. If you’ve got a powermeter, you should be aiming at around 110% of your functional threshold power
as an average for each one. Take five minutes of
easy riding between each, and then do your cool down at the end. (techno music) – [Man With Beard] This
one is very simple and yet very effective and specific. You want to find a local loop, which incorporates two
short climbs per lap, each lap being around
about 10 minutes long. Doesn’t matter if they’re
slightly differing in length. In fact, that’s probably
quite a good thing. After your warm-up, you’re
going to do five full laps. And on the first climb of each lap, you’re going to attack
it as hard as you can, from the bottom, out of the saddle. And don’t worry about fading. Then on the second climb of each lap, try to pace things, in the saddle, so that you’ve just about got enough left to do a 10 second sprint out of the saddle over the crest. Ride easy between each, and get a good cool-down in at the end. – This one is for those of you who don’t
have a short climb nearby or you have to train indoors a lot. After our warm up, we’re
going to do a pyramid session. Start off for 30 seconds, then a minute, then one minute 30, two minutes, and then back down
again, until your seventh and final interval, is 30 seconds. For each one, choose a gear that sees you pedaling at around 80 RPM for a hard effort, and then have three minutes of easy riding in between. Spinning is great on short climbs, but since they’re often steep, that’s sometimes not possible, even with compact gears
and a wide-range cassette. The lower RPM will also replicate better the kind of torque that you’ll be experiencing on short, sharp climbs. – I’m afraid to tell you that these sessions are not going to be easy. In fact, they’re going to hurt. But they should result in some fairly significant improvements
in your performance over shorter climbs. – Yeah, let us know how you
got on with those sessions, and if you’ve got any
sessions of your own, you can share those in the
comment section below this video. And if you haven’t
already subscribed to GCN, which we hope you have,
but if you haven’t, you can do that by clicking on the globe. And make sure you tell your mates, too. – Right. Two more videos
for you to watch right now. Over in the bottom corner down there is How to Change Gears Like a Pro, something very important to get right on short, steep climbs, and down here, Matt and I investigate how much difference body weight makes when you’re climbing. – Yeah, that was a good
one, that one, wasn’t it? – It was, yeah. – Awesome, mate.