Fitting Disc Brake Pads On A Road Bike

Fitting Disc Brake Pads On A Road Bike


– Disc brakes are here to stay, and whilst the pads do
last quite some time, they will eventually need replacing, so today, let’s look
at exactly how to do it so when the time comes,
it’s a nice and simple job. (dramatic electronic music) (smooth dance music) Now generally, you’re
going to want to replace your disc brake pads when
there’s about 1 1/2 millimeters or two business cards’
worth of compound left on the actual backing plate of them. Admittedly, that is quite difficult to measure exactly and so precisely, but for the small cost
of a new set of pads, it’s certainly worth erring
on the safe side of caution when it comes to replacing them. Now something also worth considering here is the huge variety of different pads that are available out there. They come in all different
shapes and sizes, but you do need the correct
ones for your caliper. There’s no such thing
as a one-size-fits-all when it comes to this,
so sometimes you’re lucky and on the back of your pad you will have a serial number or a part
number, but if you don’t, just have a look around online and try and find the same shape, and also make sure it
matches up with your caliper. If in doubt, though, go
into your local bike shop and they’ll be able to help you out with that exact pad that’s required. Also, something worth considering, too, is having a look on
the actual rotor itself and checking if they are designed for a certain compound of disc brake pad. If they are, make sure you stick to that for ultimate braking performance. (smooth dance music) The process of removing
and replacing the pads is actually a pretty simple
one, which is great news, providing you keep on
top of your maintenance as well as using decent tools. The reason I say this is
because the little bolts that tend to actually keep
the pads in place down there, well, they’re open to
the elements, of course, and the actual Allen key heads
on them are pretty small, so when it comes to releasing one, if you’ve got a little bit of corrosion which has happened inside of there, that can be a real pain in
the backside, believe me. So something I would always recommend is periodically just remove
the actual little bolt and apply just a dab of grease
on there before refitting it, of course making sure
that you avoid the pad and the rotor in the process. But a little bit of care here and there will make the job much
easier along the line. (smooth dance music) The first thing we’re going to want to do is to remove the wheel. Now the same principle applies
to both front and rear, but today, well, we’re
gonna do the front one. So simply remove it, and of
course it really does help if actually you use a
pair of gloves like this. That way any natural greases
that are actually inside of the palm of your hand or fingertips don’t contaminate the
brake pads or disc rotor, which of course can lead to
the horrible shrieking noise as well as bad performance. Now we’ve got the wheel and
the rotor out of the way. We can actually inspect a lot
closer the actual mechanics, if you like, behind how
the pads are attached inside of the caliper. So in this case we’ve got
a pin, which is attached via the caliper here on the
inside, and a little hex socket, which then goes through the pads and then threads into the
opposite side of the caliper. There’s also a tiny
little clip on here, too, which you are going to need to remove. Of course, not every system
is the same, but largely, as long as you’ve got
everything out of the way, you can actually inspect
and see how it is. It’s very, very logical and
very simple in most cases. So the first thing we’re gonna want to do is actually remove this
tiny little clip here. Helps have a little pair of pliers so we can just pop that out,
and then with our Allen key, we can simply unscrew in
the standard direction and release the locking pin. Keep it somewhere safe. Now depending on the caliper type depends on the way in which
the pads are removed from it. Whatever you do, do not use
force, because you will not need to use any force at all to remove them. Check again to make sure there’s
no springs or little clips that are holding them in place. Generally, though,
these days, most of them are nice and simple slide
in, slide out methods, so in the case of these ones
here on this SRAM groupset, I’m gonna get myself
some needle-nose pliers, and I can just slide
them backwards and out. Now the reason I can easily identify the direction in which to do it is there is a tiny little
lip here on the rear of the actual backing plate of the pad which sits against the
inside of the caliper. So it’s worth spending
just a little bit of time before you try and force it
out in the wrong direction. And simply, when you’ve got them out, well, if they’re no good,
you can just dispose of them, but always keep hold
of these little springs if you’ve got them, because you never know when you’re gonna need them again. Now that the brake pads
are out of the caliper, what we’re going to need to do is actually push the
self-adjusting pistons back into the caliper
itself, the reason being those pistons have actually been gradually getting closer and closer
to the central line in order to make up for
the lack of compound that were on the disc brake
pads that we’ve just removed. So by putting in fresh ones, of course we need that extra space again, so grab something like a tire lever and actually push them back into position inside of the caliper, like so. Make sure you don’t use anything sharp which could damage any of the components. (smooth dance music) Fitting the pads is simply the reverse of the removal process, so first up, we are going to put
the pads into position. They go in there nice and easy. And then I’m gonna want to put that locking pin in place there, too. Important, of course, to remember
not to over-tighten this, because that could lead to
problems further down the line. If in doubt, do check your
manufacturer’s manual. And then the final bit is a quite often fiddly little clip here. Now the reason for this
is a kind of fail-safe, so if the pin was to rattle loose somehow, this little clip does in
fact keep it in position, so don’t forget to use it. And finally, we’re going
to want to refit the wheel before giving the brake lever
a few pumps to make sure that the pistons are coming
out of the caliper okay and are actually
self-centering with the rotor. And then before you go out riding, actually bed those pads into the rotor, so I would suggest riding
down the road a few times, about 15 miles an hour, and
slow as quickly as possible but without actually locking
the brakes on, of course, then repeating that process a few times, and then do it just a
little bit faster, too, just to make sure that
the pads are all okay. There we are, new disc brake
pads fitted into your calipers. Now if you’ve got any suggestions for Maintenance Monday videos,
make sure you leave them down there in the comment section below, and also don’t forget, too,
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a big old thumbs up there. And don’t forget to check out the GCN shop at shop.globalcyclingnetwork.com. And now for another
video about disc brakes and five disc brakes maintenance tips, how about clicking, well, just down here.