Eco Or Turbo? | Which Power Setting Should You Use On Your E-Bike?

Eco Or Turbo? | Which Power Setting Should You Use On Your E-Bike?


– One of the main fears
of e-mountain bikers, or indeed anybody thinking about buying an e-mountain bike is
actually battery range. How much you can actually
get in terms of distance from that little unit just down by there. It’s effected by so many things. None more so than mode,
or level of assist, commonly known as eco, trail, or boost. In today’s video we’re going to have a look at the effect of
mode on battery range. (upbeat music) ♪ High in the first
round, I’ve had enough ♪ (electronic ringing) So today, we are going to
be riding the same track and adjusting the mode level to see what affect that has on the battery use. Here, we’ve got two
bikes, one is a Haibike and the other one is a
Specialised with 180 mil travel. During the day we’ll
probably see how, say, eco mode in this bike will
probably use different amounts of battery to eco mode in that bike. More than that, and something
we’ll touch on later, is how you can adjust the levels of assist on each bike as well. – The bikes we’re riding are
enduro style e-mountain bikes. They’re the kinda bikes you’re
gonna take on those big long rides where battery range
anxiety might come into play. – Yep, absolutely Chris. Now in terms of the
assistance levels on each of these bikes, I’m riding a
Yamaha powered Haibike here. It’s got five levels of assistance on it. It’s got eco plus, eco, standard, high, and extra power mode. Now this bike actually has come in standard factory settings
and you cannot adjust it. Which is actually quite
different to Chris’ bike, which you can adjust. But, Chris is riding his in
factory settings as well. Isn’t that right Chris? – Yeah, factory settings, got
three power modes on this. We’ve got an eco setting, a trail, and a turbo boost button as well. So three different settings
which can be adjusted by the Mission Control on
the app on your mobile. – Yeah, but we’re going to go into that a little bit later on. We’re going to start
this ride and we’re both going to be in low power modes. I’m going to be in eco plus
and Chris is gonna be in eco. So the trail we’ll be riding today is about six miles and
800 feet of climbing. The conditions are actually quite rough, so you might want to
take that into account when you see our results
later on in the day. Because, me and Chris actually
will use a certain amount of battery consumption, you
shouldn’t take that for granted. Because, like I said, such
things as the trail condition, the weather conditions, the
right-of-way, the tyre choice, the tyre pressures, all those are things will have an affect on your battery range. But at least we will see what’s achievable in each of the modes. – Exactly that! It’s a great example of
a typical trail ride. – Now even though I’m
riding in the lowest level of support on this bike,
it’s easy to forget just how much support
that motor is giving you. And you really have to
concentrate on keeping the momentum going to make
sure you don’t lose fitness. In fact, I actually like using a heart rate monitor to keep
eye on my effort levels. But how’s that battery doing? – Now Jones might be in eco
plus on the Yamaha motor, which arguably might be a
little bit less assistance than I’m riding on the
Brose motor on the Kenevo. But hopefully, both gonna
use minimal battery power and there’re a lot more fun than an antique bike, that’s for sure. (energising music) – Now one of the cool things
about the Yamaha PW-X system is it’s got a display which
shows your battery level. So we’re half way around this route and I’m down to 93%, so 7% usage so far. I’ve got plenty in the
tank, but the good thing about it is that it’s
really quite detailed so that you can really
fine tune your e-bike ride. – Versus the Kenevo which is actually quite stealth on the handlebars. You just got a vision indicator on the side of the down
tube which basically tells you how much battery is
left in the actual system. – How much energy have you got left? – I’ve used one bar, actually out of 10, so doing pretty good for
rocking in eco the whole way. But with this bike you can
get a third party device which will mount on the handlebars and will give you loads of
information from your heart rate, to your route, to your
cadence, every single thing. Probably more options
than what Yamaha have. – Didn’t you tell me early that you can actually have that Levo or the
Kenevo tuned into your watch, so you can actually change
the mode level on your wrist? – Yeah, yeah, with the Garmin
and the different devices like the Apple Watch and that, you can actually scroll through and change settings on
the bike via your watch. So it’s super clever. (energising music) – It’s worth pointing
out, that even though this route is six miles long, that’s not six miles of
continuous battery use. That’s because a lot of
the terrain we’re going to be pumping down through some sections and there’s a lot of downhill sections. So don’t take it as it’s
six miles of battery use. Also, we’re gonna bear in mind that because we’re in eco and eco plus mode, we’re easily able to keep under that 25 kilometres an hour restriction. So, if you go beyond that,
that means that you’re going to be using your own power which kind of effects the ride really. So I think when we get
around to riding in our turbo and high power mode on this bike, we need to be really careful
that we keep under that 25 k. Ah, Chris, what a day out. Question for you though,
do you think eco mode is one of the most underrated
aspects of e-mountain biking? – 100% and I think if
you ride in turbo mode, you’re actually getting desensitised to the whole speed and the feeling. You know when you go from eco to turbo, you get that sudden surge and you’re like, “Wow, this is amazing!” If you’re riding in that
it just becomes the norm and I think you’re just missing
out on so much more riding you could be doing in eco
and little blasts in turbo. – Yeah, I think more people need to fall back in love with eco mode. – Definitely. (energising music) ♪ We’ve been down this road before ♪ – Now we’ve completed our first, albeit short six mile trails and a loop. If you remember, I started
at 100% in eco plus mode. I’m now in 91% charge level on my bike. Which is actually, very very
little considering the amount of riding we’ve done in
the last half an hour. Chris, what’s the scores on the Kenevo– – With the Kenevo, I started on 97%, and I’ve actually finished this on 78%. So I’ve used 19% of my battery. – So that’s pretty almost
double what I’ve used. – Yeah, yeah.
– That’s quite interesting. There you can see how the modes differ, not just within a bike but
actually between bikes too. Of course, this is eco
plus and Chris is in eco. Time now then, to go
and hit that loop again. I’m gonna be in extra power
and Chris is gonna be in turbo. – [Chris] Turbo mode engaged. – Now earlier on I
mentioned how you can alter the amount of assistance
each modes gives you. Now on the Yamaha powered
bike, you can’t actually change the amount of assistance in each mode. Likewise on the Bosch bike as well. However, on the Shimano E7000, E8000 bikes you can actually change
the amount of support in each of the modes via the E-Tube app. So for example, you ride in eco, you can either have a
lot of support in eco or very little support in eco. That again, is gonna
change the amount of use, or the amount of draw
you pull on your battery. And it’s the same on Chris’ bike. On the Specialised bikes
you’ve got Mission Control. Again, you can go into the
app and you can fine tune the amount of assistance
that bike is giving you. Ah, you can see why people get consumed by the higher power settings. Because the pace difference between the first run is absolutely ludicrous. Woohoo! (energising upbeat music) It really is addictive though. Because you forget just how
fast you go on extra power mode. We’re averaging about 22
kilometres an hour on this loop. (energising upbeat music) Highly addictive and an
insane amount of fun. However, that comes at
a high price, Chris. – Definitely, yeah, I used 30% of battery on that one run then. – [Steve] Wow that’s a lot isn’t it. That’s in turbo mode on Chris’ bike. I was in extra power mode on
the Yamaha powered Haibike. Like I said, 25% battery
used on that run alone. Compared, to say, 9% which
I used on the first run and if you think about it
at that 9% on the first run, I could’ve actually done,
on a 30 minute loop, I could’ve done 10 loops. – Whoa, that’s massive.
– And that is five hours of riding, which is pretty crazy. – I suppose it comes down to how much time you’ve actually got to ride. You know, if you were to turn up here and you’ve only got an hour, then I would smash it in turbo, do a couple of laps and go home. – Exactly, I used 25% there and I could’ve done four 30 minute loops. Probably, about two and a half
thousand foot of climb in, 24 miles, that’s not bad is it. – Pretty good.
– So, there you go. Guys, let us know what you think about battery usage on your e-mountain bikes. Remember, it differs between
all the mountain bikes. Chris’ bike’s got a
different amount of torque compared to my mountain bike and say, if you compared to a Shimano bike as well. So, let’s hear your comments,
if you’ve got any questions relating to e-bike battery usage. In the meantime, check out Chris’ video, where he did his 100k the fun way, and also we’ve got one on tyres. Remember, tyres have an effect
on battery range as well. There’s one here which looks at the affect of tyre compound on battery range. – Give us a thumbs up
if you’ve enjoyed it. Don’t forget, drop us some
comments in the box below and click the globe in the middle
of us to subscribe to EMBN. – Bake and roll, hahahaha