Downhill Bikes With Plus Sized Tyres? | Ask GMBN Anything About Mountain Biking

Downhill Bikes With Plus Sized Tyres? | Ask GMBN Anything About Mountain Biking


Welcome to Ask GMBN th… (lips smack) Welcome to Ask GMBN this week where we have got the whole crew. – Everyone’s in.
– Oh yeah. – We’re splendid.
And we’re multicoloured. We’ve got everything. All the information GMBN has got to offer for you in answering your questions. Doddy, how have we found those questions? – We get them if you send them in to [email protected] or if you comment below. – And of course you can
use the hashtag #askgmbn. We have got lots of great
questions this week. Let’s get straight into it. I’m gonna test you guys. First one, I’m a bit, I’m
not sure about this question. Leo Graham, “Can you manually unicycle?” I’m not really sure. – But you’re peddling so
you’re not manually… – I think we’ll getting trolled here. People are talking about fixies. – Right.
– They’re pulling our leg. – Wrong channel.
– We’re being hadded, but, I think Leo, this question
has backfired on you if you are trolling us on
what you can and can’t manual, cause Doddy right here can do it. It can be done. – Technically yeah, cause
you’re on one wheel, and if you’re not peddling, you can. If you fit a free wheel
on one, which you can do. – Yeah, but can you actually not peddle and make a unicycle go along? – Well once you’re going
along, you can, yeah. – How can you use a
unicycle with a free wheel, how do you know which side to get on it? Which ways forward and which ways back? – Oh yeah, does it saddle?
– Check the saddle? (laughter) I’ve got to see Chris Holme
put his feet up on the crown, and the pedal’s like,
(vocalised spinning). – Imagine catching them,
no, anyway, wrong channel. – So potentially you can
manually unicycle, we think. And we would love to see
some video of you trying. That’s what we’d like. Red Panda says “Why don’t you see any plus sized downhill bikes?” Now this is an interesting question. He thinks it’s got extra
grip, extra momentum. He can’t see a reason why not. – Extra weight. – Extra punches. – Oh. – Both of those. – Okay, but– – Why extra punctures, yeah? – Well they’re not thick enough. The side walls on a plus
tyre are relatively thin to keep the weight down, and
if you made them thick enough, it’d be a big heavy tyre and there’s an argument for
something in the middle. I think we might see a two point six or a proper two point five
where it is not quite plus. – And where would we consider a plus tyre? What size is that? Two point eight?
– Two point eight upwards. – Two point eight upwards, so probably not that big, but somewhere– – It was three inch to start
with but industry kinda settled on two point eight cause
it handled a bit better. – What is it called? It’s called a midfat so they
have to be super bit fat. – I think we’ve ended up at a maybe there. That’s what I think we got to is that maybe we’re gonna get
bigger tyres in downhill. Bodhi Byronboy says, “I am 143 cm tall and I am looking for a new bike. What tyre size should I get
and is Norco a good brand?” Now I think by “what tyre
size?”, we think he’s asking what – Wheel size.
– Yeah. – I think so. One, that’s relatively
short now, I suppose. Although, people says 29s
are for taller riders, I’m not totally convinced. I’m average height, I’m what? About five ten. – Did you say average? Slightly below. – Exactly average. 29 is fine for me but… – Yeah, the only limitation
is how small the frame can be. – I mean I’ve seen some of the
XE women races, a World Cup, riding 29s and some of those
girls are really really small. – Quite tiny, yeah.
– Yeah, really small. – Yeah it looks like they sit in the bike rather than up on it. – Yeah. You could go for a 29, but
what would you recommend? I would say 27.5 to most
people at the moment. Is that about right? – I would say 29 to most people – Would ya?
– But look at the size of ya. – I’m loving 29 at the moment. – Oh, there’s a conflict. – There’s no right or wrong though. Both wheel sizes work really well for whatever you’re gonna do. – There’s no right or
wrong, but I was right. Okay next question, Odhran Ryan says, “Air keeps coming out my rear
suspension. How can I fix it? Or do I have to buy a new one?” – Sounds like he’s blown a seal. – Oh no, is that it?
– Send it off. – Done?
– Nah. – Service, pretty much.
– Get a service. – Submit to higher level shock. If it’s a cheaper bike,
with cheap shock on it, you might find blowing
it is the end of it. and you might be better
off upgrading your shock. – Right, right. Okay, well so, might need a
tune, possibly need a new one, but more on the subject of shocks, let’s take a look at our video where we delved into how
to tune a real shock. – The air shock is the
most common form of shock seen on the average
mountain bike these days. The reason for that is it’s lightweight and it’s easily adjustable for
a whole wide range of riders. In addition to that, you tend to have two damping adjustments,
rebound and compression. So we’re gonna demonstrate
with a couple of Fox shocks and a Rock Shock shock that
are quite common these days, and show you how to
adjust your air pull-in. – Welcome back. Next question, Martyn. – Right, next question is from
Kumud Nakarmi and he says, “WD40, what does it do? How do I properly use it? And can I use it to clean chains?” That’s a good question
because lots of people are not necessarily using
WD40 for the right thing because it’s actually an amazing product, but it’s very specific. – Let’s start with the name.
WD40 is water displacer 40, so it took 40 goes to
get the formula correct. – Yes.
– It’s whole purpose, it was designed solely just to drive out water and
provide basic lubrication to stop things corroding.
– Basic lubrication. – I use it a lot. For, after I wash my bike,
chains still wet there, I always spray it down with that. Then get a rag and clean
it off, and then rewrap. – But… They do do de-greaser. – Yeah, they got dedicated bike range now, so although you can lubricate
and clean with WD40, it’s sole purpose isn’t
to lubricate or to clean. – Right.
– So you can get more specific products for that. – Let me get it straight. If you’re gonna clean your chain, at what point would you use WD40? You’ve cleaned your
chain off, then you WD40. – To drive out any water that’s set up. – And then you would grease your chain? – Well then I would–
– Lube it. – Dry it then lube it.
– Lube your chain. – It’s part of the process. It’s not the final part of the process. – It’s a multi-use product. – Yeah, multi-use. John Galvan says, “When you
said that the shock will blow up,” this is referring to
a question we had last week, “What do you mean by “blow up”?” I guess maybe John’s thinking, am I supposed to think
it’s about to go boom? – I’m always worried about that, as well. – Yeah, I mean, do they go– – Blowing a shock.
– But when you say, “blow up”, do they explode? – There has been a few cases of that. – Oh.
– For real. – Generally meaning you’re
blowing your seals out. – But it wouldn’t necessarily
be fire and devastation? – Hot oil.
– It’d be a miracle if you get fire out of one of those. I mean (laughter). – Back in 1998, I had a Fox Vanilla? Was it Fox Vanilla?
– Yeah, really? – On a Kona Manomano and it had blown, and there’s oil coming
out of it, so I had it, I don’t know why, in my bedroom, I was fiddling with it and it exploded and it filled my room with oil. There was a shadow of me on the wall. (laughter) – That’s great. – Well, John, I hate to say it can happen. – Well, I’ve not done in a long time. – It sounds rare.
It sounds rare. I wouldn’t worry too much. But usually, I guess, just for safety, most shocks, if they’ve go– – All shocks have oil within them. – Yeah, generally. It can be quiet a delicate situation. MyKeyboardIsBroken is, he’s asking, “Guys, how to calculate the
speed to jump over a gap?” For example, if he’s got
a one to two metre gap, how does he calculate the
perfect landing and speed? That’s a very– – Simple equation for this, Martyn. It’s mass times velocity divided by gap. (laughter)
I think. – Is that right?
– No. (laughter) – He had me there. I was like, wow, I had no idea. – That was quite good actually. – After all this time, I could’ve just been working it out on my computer. – It’s completely experience. – Yeah, it’s experience. You gotta just work your way up. – You’re the gap man, Blake. – Yeah, you gotta work your way up. Start off small and then you know exactly how fast you have
to go to hit three feet. Then you know after that,
go a little bit faster. Hit four feet.
– Yeah. – Then you go a little higher. Just getting comfortable with going. – And, of course, every take off makes a huge difference to the gap
that you’re trying to jump. – As well as if it’s wet, is it dry? If it’s hard pack? – There’s no easy answer, I’m afraid. You just gotta get out there and ride, and you start to understand
the different speeds required and techniques, and that’s
what it’s all about. That’s actually riding. That’s the fun bit. – You might have a few
faceplants on the way. – There’ll be some fails, for sure. – Yes, but Blake’s given
us some great advice there, so let’s jump to his
video on how to build a, if you’re a beginner, a
mountain bike dirt jump, and get started on hitting those takeoffs. – Whoa, wow. Man, this location is sick. The dirt is perfect for digging in. Today is the day where I show you how to build a progressive
jump, one that you can progress on, and just get
all your skills up together. But first, you need one of these. The spade. – We are flying through this week’s show. So many good questions. Here’s another one from Peter Hartman. “Great show.”
Last week, thanks, Peter. Can you guys discuss what you think about the bike industry will look
like in ten years time. Will direct to consumer brands
change the playing field of things and will that
change the price of bikes, because lower cost of
entry and things like that? Whatcha think, guys? What’s mountain biking gonna
look like in ten years? – Direct to consumer’s
been around for a while. Hasn’t it? I don’t know.
– Yeah, it’s been a while now. Is it changing the landscape
of the industry, though? Is it making much more– – In short term I think it is. But I think it will
always return to having independent bike dealers and stuff because as bikes get more complicated, you’re gonna need that
face-to-face, you know? If you’re getting with e-bikes
and stuff, tuning and– – Just by saying that, e-bikes are the big question mark of the moment. And that will definitely
change the dealer, just like you were just saying. – I think e-bikes for me
are the thing that’s gonna really change the landscape
of mountain biking, because when people ride those bikes,
they get excited by em. That’s gonna get bigger and bigger. That is gonna change things. But you can’t underestimate the value of an independent dealer to talk to. – Local bikes shops.
– Your local bike shop. – Local bike shops, you
can’t get rid of them. Can’t get rid of them. – Big part of riding for me.
– Support them. – Hanging out at shop,
chatting about riding and that sorta feel is what
mountain bike means to me. So I hope we don’t lose that. Lyman says, well, more of a
suggestion than a question, “Global Trials Network?”
Anyone? Anyone? Another suggestion, a
trials week, on GMBN. I love this guy. Parker Lyman, everything
there sounds right to me. – There could be some good guests. – Could be some, yeah.
– Yeah. – I mean, come on, trials has brought some great legends to the sport. (clears throat)
– I like a bit of trials. – Hans Rey.
– Hans Rey. – Libor Karas.
– Libor Karas. And?
Chris Ackerman. – Martin Hawes.
– Martin Hawes, yeah yeah. – Danny Mac.
– Enough of this. I’ll tell you what, why don’t we, while we’re talking about trials, throw to a moment in Whistler
where Blake and Doddy had a bit of a trials-off and I
got to be very entertained. – Welcome to my Whistler Trials Challenge. (laughter) – [Blake] It’s heavy. – [Doddy] I wouldn’t go that way, Blake. – It’s close! Okay, it’s the quickfire section. It is gonna be fast. We’re doing a clockwise direction. One question, one answerer. Guys, are you ready? – Ready.
– No. – Sure, right, here we go. First question is to Blake. Tom Scholfield asks,
“How long does it take Doddy to do his hair before the show?” – One hour.
– An hour. Neil, Sam Luff says, “Why is Martyn holding a tyre lever the whole time?” – Cause he’s a fidget. – I’m a fidget.
– Haha, he’s a fidget. – Doddy, Tobias Lawson-Dick says, “Doddy is very clever, isn’t he. First question, so much knowledge.” – Thanks. – This one’s for me. Wez Lee, “Doddy is a
guru on MTB information, his insight and tips are spot on. You’re a national treasure
to the nation of MTB DIYs. That is all true.
– That is true. – No, you’re doing well
in quickfire this round. Next one is to Blake. Pierre Holt says, “Are Fox suspension and Fox Protection and Apparel from the same company
or are they separate?” – Separate. – But are they from the same company? – Not the same company.
– Doddy knows history. – Let’s go to Doddy for this one. – There’s two brothers,
Jeff and Bob basically, and they started the company and then they split into Head and Tail. – Ooh, they split.
– Well. – One for clothing, one
for suspension components. – I didn’t know, wow. – This is quickfire, stop talking. Right, Neil, Salamander Workshop says, “I have to disagree with you guys, I think 26 will come back to Enduro.” – You are kidding me. – Dimensions of Earth
says, a standup wheelie can also be called a catwalk, Doddy. – What? – Oh, can it now? – He didn’t know that.
– I didn’t know that. Thank you.
– And that is the end of quickfire until next week. Correct Me If I’m Wrong
this week is gonna start with correcting us when we were wrong. This is Correct Me and
Doddy from last week’s. – There’ll be a lot of these. – Marlon Profe says, this is about whether you could manual a fixie or not, and he’s saying, you could
just stand on the chainstays, and therefore, you would
be manualing a fixie. – You could, I guess.
– It’s a fair point. Okay, next up in Correct Me
If I’m Wrong, these videos. First one is from Michael Hawke. It’s of his eight year old nephew, Jasper Martin, in California. You guys. – You’re gonna love this.
– Whoa. – Is he gonna take over our jobs? – He’s cool already. What can he do to correct this? – A little youth.
– He’s going for it. It’s all in slow mo because
you wanna build the tension. – [Blake] Whoa, he’s
going for the big side. – [Martyn] I think if you
can see it’s going wrong. – Oh.
– Okay. – [Neil] Ooh, is he gonna stay on? He stayed on.
– Oh, he stayed on. – Wait.
– Oh, hang on. (room groans and hisses) – [Martyn] It’s gonna be a big crash. – [Doddy] Oh, a tank slapper. – [Neil] Aw, his ankle. Wow, that’s a big crash, Jasper. That is a big crash.
– Wow, that’s a big crash. (grunt) That little guy got around that bike. – I’ll tell you what that was. Was very entertaining. – It was.
– That’s a buckaroo. – It was an amazing, amazing crash. – I hope he’s alright.
– That was a big jump. I would say on a small bike like that, maybe back it down a little
bit to a smaller jump, and learn how to get a bit more high. – Yeah. But I mean, you were committed. – Oh yeah.
– You went for that. That’s what jumps require. Hopefully you didn’t
get any injuries there, but you came down hard on that ankle. That was nasty. If you got away with it, you did quite a lot of things right
because it’s not easy. – Tuck and roll.
– That’s not an easy crash to get away with. – You tucked and rolled.
– That was nasty. Great stuff. Thanks for watching us this week. We really love getting your
questions, so make sure you shove them in the
comments section down below. You can send them to us
on social media, #askgmbn, or on our email, which is [email protected] Doddy, can you think of
one single video we’ve done that would just be great
for these guys to do now? – I can, I’ll help here. Click over here for how to night ride. I think he wants to put
something over there. – Over here, on five basic tricks to learn on a dirt jump bike,
or any bike out there. – That’s great action to watch there. And if you want to subscribe,
then hit the GMBN logo. – Thumb.
– And yeah, get some thumbs, see ya next time.