Do You Need A Trials Bike? | Ask GMBN Anything About Mountain Biking

Do You Need A Trials Bike? | Ask GMBN Anything About Mountain Biking


(explosive crackling) – What’s up for this week’s Ask GMBN. We got Chris Smith in the room today. – Yo, right. – To help me out with some
good answers, hopefully. Right, let’s get straight in there. These questions all come
from the comments section of last week’s Ask GMBN,
not Dirt Shed show. And generally using the #AskGMBN. So, starting with Piotr Dubicki. “Hey guys, I use mirrored
lenses on my goggles. I’ve gone through quite a few lenses now due to scratches from
trying to clean off mud and rain on the trail
by using the micro fiber in your gloves.” – Often get it don’t you?
– Yeah. “Any tips on cleaning mud
and water off my lenses so I don’t get any more scratches?” – Nice little tip I’ve got
for you is actually Rainex. It’s a car product which
you spray on your windscreen to stop all that rain
actually collectin’ up. If, you just give the goggles or your glasses a squirt of that stuff, actually stops that rain even sittin’ on there in the first place. It just literally runs straight off. – Never tried that,
– So, it’s a pretty good one. – I would say, I used to
love using mirrored lenses, but, I used to use one
sporting good company and they were like 30 quid each, these lenses
– Good money, yeah. – So, I didn’t use ’em in mud ever – Yeah. – But, what I do if stuff is really muddy, I’ll actually take the
lenses out, don’t touch it, – Yeah.
– ’cause you’ll scratch it when it’s dry and just run it under a tap until it’s really wet and just
– Just really wet, yeah. – wash it all off and then use
like a towel to clean it off. – Think about, when you’re
actually using those glasses, well, obviously, when
you’re climbing back up to the top of those runs,
just whip ’em off and, you know, stick ’em in a bit of tissue or a goggle carry bag.
– Yeah. – Protects ’em pretty
good as well, so, yeah. – That’s expensive business buying lenses. – It is. – All right, JoeyHoflandFilms has got a Specialized Stumpjumper 29
and a Hardtail 2012 edition. “The headset looks like it’s tapered, but it’s got a Rockshox Reba
Fork, which is straight.” – Mm-hmm. – Could you adapt it to
change the forks on that bike? – Yeah, a few different options there. The first one and the cheapest
one is probably to look at that crown race, which is the
bottom part of the headset, which sits on top of the fork. Crown and bottom of the
steerer, that you can get in lots of different options,
inch and an eighth and 1.5. So, that’d probably be the
cheapest way of doing it. – Yeah, I think a good piece of advice is go to Cane Creek website. – [Chris] Mm-hmm. There’s a headset finder on there. – [Chris] Yes. You can measure things.
– Yep. – Look at exactly what you’ve
got and how you can adapt it. But, I’d say it’s probably
pretty likely you can adapt it. – [Chris] Yeah. RedSpaceBar. “Hey guys I’m trying to get new pedals because the ones I’m using right now are the stock plastic ones
that came with the bike. I don’t know what type of pedals to get. I ride street and
occasionally small trails and my feet are an average size.” – Yeah, so first bit of
advice is get rid of those plastic pedals if you’re riding street. Pedals is obviously a really important contact point in that bike. So, swapping that around is gonna give you a lot more confidence,
especially going into those, like, street maneuvers. You know, a decent alloy
pedal, what you thinking? – Yeah, well, I was gonna
say, actually, Crank Brothers do stamps in, well, normal
size, they call them– – Yeah.
– large. I actually have gotten normal size. I’ve got a size UK8, that’s like– – Large on mine.
– a 42 or something like that. They’ve actually brought
them out in real cheaper, the budget edition for the
stamp one, which is plastic, But they’ve got metal pins, which makes– – [Chris] Makes a big difference. – Yeah, the world of difference. But, there’s loads of good
pedal brands out there. that do different size pedals. So, that doesn’t make a difference. – Think about what footwear
– Yeah. – you’re combining with that as well. Like a decent riding shoe,
like a sticky sole shoe, can make a world of difference too. – Yep, here’s a video on
how to choose some pedals. – Pedals are one of the things on a bike that are actually taken for granted, but they’re very important to get right. And the reason for that is
the fact that they’re your major contact point, but
also, it dramatically change the way the bike rides
and how you feel on that. At GMBN we’re supported by Crank Brothers which works out pretty well for us because they make flat
pedals and clipless pedals. So, Blake loves the flats. Personally, I’m a clip sort of fan. And it generally suits the way we ride. But here behind me, I’ve got a whole bunch of different pedals and shoes
and I’m gonna walk you through the best way to select
the right pedal for you. – Right, here’s a good one for you Chris. This guy, Baqpak is a BMX
street rider who recently bought a Dirt Jumper and is
wondering how far he can push a Dirt Jumper in the
streets when it can’t, obviously, considering it comes without pegs and with brakes. – Just as capable as a BMX, I reckon. Like, it’s not more capable.
– At street stuff. – Yeah, at street stuff. You mentioning, like, pegs,
you’ll probably be into your grinds and that. I think a while back Marzocchi
actually did do a fork which you could combine pegs with
– Did they? – Yeah, an old school one, mind. But, there’s different ways
of putting pegs on as well and there’s all sorts
of grinds you can do. You have pedal grinds, chaining
grinds, lot’s of stuff. There’s guys like Matt
Macduff and all The Rise, those guys do loads of creative riding basically on just big
BMX, ’cause they’re into the 24 inch wheels with pegs. – They do smooth out,
obviously, the wheels aren’t real strong, but
they’re pretty flippin’ strong, most street wheels, now. – Yeah, any of those guys. – But it does smooth
the stuff out, I think, having big wheels, whereas
BMX can be pretty harsh on street stuff.
– Pretty harsh, yeah. – Right, Mitchy Macaw, “Why do some full-suspension bikes have rear-suspension on different spots. For example, some are on the
top tube, some on down tube and some are close to the bottom bracket.” So, talking about different
suspension designs. Why are they different? – It’s all different for
the purpose of the bike. You see a lot more, like
cross-country bikes are more designed to be efficient for peddling, not so designed for big hits. Whereas, you know, the
downhill bikes with like different linkages and
bigger shock leverage ratios, things like that. So, that’s why they’re all in different spots.
– That’s what it’s for it’s that leverage ratio
graph and different designs give you different
personalities to the bike. I would say some of it,
as well, is marketing. Is that some bikes wanna look different, so they’ll, you know,
completely change it all. It’s funny, you look at
something like a motocross bike, they all look very, very similar. – Yeah
– It’s all the same swing arm, linkages, but mountain
bikes, slightly different. – Yeah – Okay, MarcelMiro. “How do you measure rear shock travel?” – Ooh, good question. If you’re talking about shock
stroke, obviously, you can measure that or the
fitment to the bike from like the eye to eye or
the shaft stroke, as well. So, if you measure how much that actual, you have like a little
rubber ring on the shocks. You can actually measure
how much that moves on it’s biggest hit. You could let all the air pressure, if you’ve got an air shock, the pressure, see how much that shock actually moves. – Yeah. – If you’re talking
about rear wheel travel. – There’s different travel there. – It’s different isn’t it. – So, fork’s dead easy. There’s obviously no linkature. Whatever it travels is travel. Actually, we’re talking
about rear suspension. It’s how much that rear
axle moves vertically. So, to actually get an
accurate measurement of that you could, maybe, stick
something off the back of your saddle above the rear axle, but I don’t think it’s
gonna be very accurate to work like that.
– That’s really hard, yeah. – Best way, really, is just
to Google it because all suspension mountain bikes
you’re gonna be able to find that information on
the web, I would’ve thought. – Yeah, definitely. – Measurement not that simple. Iron Ore. “I want to learn some more trials skills and I’m finding it very difficult.” – It is difficult, ridin’
trials, I am crap at it. You know that. “Would buying a trials bike
speed up the learning curve and then would the skills
roll over to the other bikes or should I stop making excuses?” – Well, trial as Don said is
a really hard skill to master. A lot of different bikes out there. The 26 inch bikes that tend
to be mostly on the market now are more aimed at like
competition style trials, which means a lot of back
wheel, hopping around like a pogo stick everywhere. They’re really bad, well,
hard not bad, but they’re hard to ride on anything apart
from the back wheel. So, if you are learning trials there, they are quite hard to get on with. I’d look for like a older
school, 26 inch bike Or a lot of the 24 inch bikes now. – Yeah. – You know, like Danny Mac
rides, are more designed for like streety stuff and they’re more, they would make trials more accessible, but you’ve got like the
20 inch bikes as well, which is more like big
BMXs with fat tires. – Pretty specialist.
– Yeah. Really lightweight, but again
they’re quite hard to go. I think, like the 24 inch
would be your best bet and that would relate
closer to a mountain bike. – I’ve seen you do plenty
of trialsy stuff on a Dirt Jump Hardtail.
– Yeah. Yeah, it depends what level
you’re gonna do it at. If you’re just learning
those basic trials techniques and as Don says, a normal sort
of Hardtail Dirt Jump bike would suffice for that
stuff, as well as a normal Trail Bike, you can do all
that stuff on, full-suspension, but it does make it harder. – Yeah. – So, if you are looking
to get into it, I think a 24 inch trials bike would
speed up that learning process. – It totally crosses over. There’s plenty of trials riders,
push bike and motor bike, people like Warner, Petey,
– Yeah, yeah. – who do that really well
and are really really good on a mountain bike because of that. – Definitely that trials
backbone gives you mega-skills out there no matter what riding. – Yep. Check out this park
bench trials challenge. – I’ve got an idea. Let’s do some challenges. – Okay.
– Okay? – Challenges are good, yep. What we got? – That. – What, this? – This is the only obstacle
we’re allowed to ride. Let’s call it the bench challenge. (light music) There you go. That’s super trialy. – [Man] Hang that out. Get yourself ready. (wheels squeaking) – Oh! – [Man] Hey, dude, you got it. – Bloody hell. Well, that’s it, that’s a good challenge. Sure tests your nerves, I tell ya. – K, Ben Leach has got a question about the new Michelin Wild Tires
that come on the new Nukeproofs. Sam Hill has been running some, I don’t know if they’re the
same tires, that’s the thing. – Right. – He’s asking us what we think of them. He knows we ride Continental
Tires, but have we used ’em? I’ve never used them
but they came on my bike and they looked pretty good. – Yeah, I haven’t used a
Michelin tire for years now, but back when I did race
– Yeah. – they were the brand to be riding. So, they’ve definitely got
that heritage and knowledge and obviously a massive tire manufacturer. – They used to be really big in the game. So, I used to be sponsored by Michelin back in the early 2000s,
um, with Steve Peat’s help, and I left to go to the World Rally. – Right. – They’ve completely took away their Downhill World Cup support
and now they seem to be back on the mountain bike scene in a big way and I know Sam Hill likes those tires. The ones he rode felt super, super soft. – [Chris] Did they? – [Don] I checked ’em
out on his bike check, but I don’t think that they
are production tires yet. But, they might well become ’em. – [Chris] They’re gonna be good coming from Michelin, guaranteed. – And if Sam was ridin’ ’em they’re probably gonna
perform pretty well. – Yeah. – We’re on to the quick fire round. I’m gonna fire some at you,
Chris, if you’re ready. – Yep. – Maik Eckert. “Which way would be faster, a steady and not that
steep but long ascend,” A what? A steady but not that steep, long ascend, “or a short steep ascend
and then a long flat?” – I’m confused already. – I’m confused. – Let’s move on. (laughs) – (laughs) It depends. Josh Foster. “So, I recently had a crash and I’m off the bike for
about two to three months. How can I stay sane?” – Watching videos. Watch GMBN, watch EMBN,
anything bike related. Any videos is gonna keep you sane. – Get into rehab. I’m sure we’ve both done this. You will love it when you
get back on your bike. So, just keep watching stuff, I reckon. Ethan Gausch. “Hey guys, love show.” Thank you very much. “I’ve got a 2008 GTS M5 XC bike,” I don’t know that one. “with a stock generic 110mm coil fork.” He’s upgraded brakes, put
wider bars, shorter stem, rides the bike aggressively. “Should I upgrade my fork
and make the travel longer or save money while riding
my bike at the moment for a Trail Hardtail?” – Upgrading’s always like
a hard thing, I think. I think you need to look
at what you’re doing and unless you’re better
than your actual bike at the moment, I wouldn’t go spending a load of money on that bike upgrading it. I’d probably save that money
and probably put it towards a better bike in the end. – Yeah, try and work
out, write down how much these things gonna cost you, how much the new bike’ll cost you, how much can you sell your old bike for, and then how much do you think
you really want that bike and weigh it all up. – Yeah.
– Anyway. Okay, Alex Savvas. “Is it worth getting a dropper post on my beginner mountain bike?” – I think a dropper post is
one of the biggest upgrades. I think it’s one of the
things that I don’t usually go without on a bike now. You know, if I haven’t got a dropper– – They’re getting cheaper, as well.
– Yeah. – So it’s worth it, I reckon. – Yeah, definitely. – PLM Rubio gets a lot of
pinch flats when jumping. “So I decided to ride higher pressures but I think I’m not as aggressive now. Is riding tubeless worth it?” Do you ride tubeless? – I do, yeah, on all my bikes
actually, even for jumping. I know Sam Pilgrim and
Matt Jones, a few of those like high level dirt jump
guys still run tubes. – Yeah. – Purely because they don’t
like that sort of tire deforming under extreme, sort of, take
offs and things like that. – You see it occasionally
– And spinning. – at like Crankworx,
people like Rick Atkin have flipped into mental spins and overshoots or over rotates and they’ll just boof.
– Yeah. – It’s so much force going through it. – Exactly, yeah. I think–
– I think they run tubes. – Yeah. – You often see the tube come flying out. – Yeah, a little tire squirm, you know, you land a rotation slightly
off axis or something, you will spurt a load of sealant out. So, depends. I think you need to look
at your tire pressures you’re running those tubes at. If you’re running a tube, I
know Pilgrim and those guys 80 to 100 psi sometimes on the skatepark. So, big, big pressures in the tubes. – And if you’re pinching whilst jumping, I would check out your technique as well. You might be casing jumps. – Sounds like it.
– I mean, we’ve all done it. Fire and Ice. “GMBN would you recommend
a 29er or 29 inch?” – What you thinking, Don? I like the 29er. – I don’t get it. – You like the 29 – 29 inch.
(laughter) – What difference is. Anyway, nice one. Thanks for your questions. As ever, leave your questions down below and we’ll try and get around
to answering them next week. – If you enjoyed today’s Ask show be sure to check out me and Blake Sampson on our trials challenge. That’s up here as well. – Good trial skills. And if you want to see
a video on how to learn that rear wheel lift, click over here. Thumbs up, if you love us
trying to answer your questions and hit that subscribe button.