Cycling Cornering Made Easy | GCN Cycling Tips

Cycling Cornering Made Easy | GCN Cycling Tips


– This is all you need
to know about cornering. (upbeat music) – One of the most important
things to remember is that you go where you look. So, make sure you look
at where you want to go. Now that sounds simple
but, it’s all too easy to end up looking at the very
thing that you want to avoid, like a lamp-post or a massive rock. So, repeat it like a mantra. Look where you want to go. And where do you want to go? The exits, of course. Always turn your head
and look for the point at which the corner finishes
and you’re going in a straight line again. It’s pretty easy to do on gentle curves, but the tighter the corner,
the more unnatural it feels, to the point that even
real experienced riders can forget to do it, but don’t. It’s really important. (slow bass music) – For anybody new to cycling, one of the strangest sensations is leaning
the bike while cornering. But you can’t corner at speed without it. It’s hardly surprising that leaning doesn’t feel comfortable. Looking at road bike tyres
with an untrained eye is hardly confidence inspiring. I mean, look at how narrow they are. How can you trust that? Well, you can. Road tyres are much, much
grippier than you think. Yes, you need to be a
bit careful in the rain and on gravel, but on good quality tarmac, you can really lean over. Now I’m not saying that
you have to go too far and too fast, but it’s
good to know that you can. – There’s one thing that
you should know about leaning your bike over when cornering and that is that at a certain angle, an angle that might not
feel particularly extreme, you will hit your inside
pedal on the floor if it’s facing downwards
in the 6 o’clock position. So, don’t pedal through
fast or tight corners. And better than that,
drop your outside pedal to the 6 o’clock position and
put your weight through there. It makes the pedal as far
out of harm’s way as possible and it actually helps to give
your tyres even more grip, making you more secure on the road. – So, if you can get those
three techniques down, it will make a massive
difference to your ability and your confidence. Remember, GCN is your one-stop destination for all things cycling
and you can subscribe for free by clicking on the globe. – You can indeed. Tell you what videos might
be relevant to you now. Cornering is of course, a very
integral part of descending but there are other aspects to that too. You can find our tips on
descending just down here or for our tips on riding
and dealing with wet and rainy conditions, click down there. – You up for a coffee? – I’m out of breath. I need a rest and a coffee.
– So am I.