Cutting Edge Bike Tech & The Ultimate Car For Cyclists | GCN Tech Show Ep. 78

Cutting Edge Bike Tech & The Ultimate Car For Cyclists | GCN Tech Show Ep. 78


– Welcome to the GCN Tech Show. This week, we’ve got a
car which could be ideal if you’re a keen cyclist, and then also we’ve got
a crowd funding project, and Hank visited Newport Velodrome to check out some new tech. (upbeat music) (whoosing) For this week’s hot topic,
whilst Hank was over at the Newport Velodrome
in Wales in the UK, he decided to talk to the
folks from Dimension Data to see exactly what they’ve been up to with regards to implementing
some new tech within the track. – I’m with Tim him here,
who’s head of technology and works for Dimension Data, now… – Do you want me to tell you
what my actual job role is? – Yeah, go on. – Right, so I’m a director,
senior director of technology, architecture and technology. – Senior director in architecture… – Of architecture and (laughing) – Senior director of architecture… – Architecture and technology. – Architecture in technology. – [Tim] And technology. – [Hank] And technology. – Sorry about this, it’s
a mouthful isn’t it? – You say it. – Want me to say it? – Yeah. – So, hi, I’m Tim. (laughing) (high pitched beeping) I’m the Senior Director of Architecture and Technology at Dimension Data. – Now say that three times, trust me, you won’t be able to do it. All right. (laughing) Now I’ve come into this velodrome, not really knowing an awful lot. I know James MacDonald’s
doing a world record. – Yep. – But I didn’t actually know
what kind of tech was involved. Can you give us a little bit of a snippet, in layman’s terms… – Of what we’re doing. – About what you are actually doing. – Okay, so what we’re doing
is we’re trying to help James’s performance team
make decisions on the fly while James is doing the record attempt. So, if you can imagine, he’s
going to be on the track, so how do we get that
information from him, to the performance coach so
that they can say, you know… – In real time. – In real time, go faster,
go slower, you know, power up, power down, whatever,
whatever he needs to do. So what we’re doing is,
we’ve got a couple of different things, so if
you can imagine we’ve got static data that we’ve
got from James already. – [Hank] Yeah. – [Tim] So we know how
much he weighs, we know his physiology, his heart rate
zones, things like that. But then we’re capturing live data, so we’ve got a 3D
positioning set up in here, so we can know where he
is on the track exactly. We’re also capturing
ANT+ data, so you know, standard things like heart
rate, power, speed, cadence. And then we’ve written a
load of custom algorithms that then help us understand things, like how many calories he’s burnt, is he on an upward or a
downward trajectory for example. So things like, just to
help them make decisions. – But you, with Dimension Data, have been working on the Tour. – Yup. – With this similar kind of technology, am I right in saying? – So, this year’s our
fifth year working with the Tour de France… – Yeah. – The ASO and the Tour de France. And I suppose what we’ve done is, for the stuff with the velodrome, we’ve taken elements of the
solution and the learnings that we’ve had while we’ve been there, and brought them into this. We’ve done other things,
like we’ve worked with Madison doing the Six Day
Series for a couple of years, and that’s obviously a
velodrome based event. – Yeah. – We’ve done stuff with like the JTU, the Japanese Triathlon Union. – Oh wow! – Yeah over in Yokohoma which is fun. – Yeah that sounds… – It was actually the
worst day ever ’cause it just rained for the whole day. But anyway (laughing) – That’s never good. – No, so we’ve used
elements of the solution and then we’ve sort of,
we’ve basically updated it and made it better for, more suited for, tailored for James’s use. You know, but still we
have to have the lasers, see how they’ve done in the velodrome, to fit all this stuff in
and it all sort of comes in, and then there’s this mad
flurry of activity at the end. – So explain a bit about that, how many lasers, just
give us a little bit of a background on, you know, all the lasers in creating this 3D virtual velodrome. – So basically there’s
a set of anchors around the inner and outer edges
of the track, right, and what happens is we give James a tag, and the tag bounces the
radio off the anchors at the edge of the track
and then we can position him based on an algorithm that
gives, basically you get time of flight of how long the radio takes to go there and back. – Blimey, that sounds
like interesting stuff. I’m pretty jealous
actually that Hank managed to get over there, because
I’d love to actually be able to check all that out for myself. I think the idea behind it,
personally, for training, is really, really good. For use in competition,
maybe not quite so, ’cause I’m not a big fan
of race radios really, I like riders that kind of
use their own intuition, but certainly for a coach
or a directeur sportif to be able to monitor
their rider’s training, that is ideal, and maybe
for us home users too, or well not quite home
users but out on the road, if we needed some extra
motivation, possibly, with a quick old 5G
connection, once that becomes really mainstream, that
could really take off. Well, let me know what you lot think, down there in the comments section below. Should this be UCI legal? Is it the future of
training and being able to monitor all of those different metrics? Get involved in the comments section and next week we will be
back with another Hot Topic. (whooshing) Hot Tech now and car
company Skoda who of course are heavily involved within
the cycling/racing scene, as well as actually
starting their business manufacturing bicycles way back in 1896, have just released a
concept car, the Karoq. And all of the features
came after some research done with 1,500 cyclists,
so I reckon it’s time we had a quick look
exactly what the ideal car for a cyclist looks like. Firstly then, we’ve got
ourselves a twin bike rack, on the roof, and then inside
of the car there’s another sort of racking system too
but it does look like you actually have to, well,
dismantle it a little bit, because on the images which
you’re seeing right now, there’s a saddle missing
and also a bit of rotation on the bar, so it’s not
ideal but well it’s a step in the right direction. We’ve also got an integrated
cool box in there too, so you can keep your food,
your drinks, your snacks, your gels, everything like that in there. There’s also a net to keep
any helmets in position. There’s also a little
pressure washer too so you can just rinse off your
bikes, and then, get this, they’ve got a washing
machine inside of the car, albeit a very, very
small one, you certainly wouldn’t want to do your weekly washing, but, well, just to quickly
give something a bit of a spruce up and without it stinking in the back of the car for a while, I guess it’ll do the job. And then, there’s even a
tool chest in there too, so if you have any maintenance problems, just before you set off for your ride you can easily solve that. It also comes with a
follow me style drone too, so presumably you have to
wear some sort of transmitter, and it’ll follow you along and film you, although it’s not going to
probably follow your whole ride, but it’s better than nothing, I guess. And then, you can even
upload all of that footage to your favorite social media platform, via the built in wifi
hotspot inside of the car. How cool is that? Now if you can’t get hold of
the Skoda Karoq concept car which, well you’re not going to
be able to, it’s very unlikely, then maybe something which
you can buy, is ideal for you if you travel to lots of races or events. The Silca Maratona Minimo kit bag. So it’s got some internal
dividers in there, so that all of your
worldly belongings don’t get mixed up on the way to that event. And then you’ve also got
a mesh style compartment so that when your sweaty
or mucky cycling clothes get put back into it,
well, it doesn’t end up festering away until you unload it at your washing machine in your
home, not in your car, for you to start cleaning it. And also the same goes for your shoes too. A great little bit of kit
there, and I’m glad to see that sort of thing because
when I used to race I used to take with me the biggest
bag ever, and I could never find exactly what I was looking for. Something completely
different now, and it’s on the Indiegogo crowd funding site, and it’s from a company called Culprit. Now they’ve got a few different products being launched but the
most interesting one has to be, in my opinion, a
stem with a removable cover. Now that removable cover
means you can route cables and wires a lot easier, if
aerodynamics is your thing. And now it is designed I must
say for frames which have cables that enter into the
top tube, so you’re looking at time trial bikes, triathlon bikes, a few road bikes out there have it too. We traditionally, you tend
to have quite unsightly wires going everywhere and it
looks a bit like a big pile of messy spaghetti or something. But well, by using this,
it certainly cleans it up a little bit at the front end. Another benefit of this has
to be that you can add on aerodynamic tri bars, so your, well your skis as we like to call them, they don’t have to attach
onto the actual handlebar of a standard road bike. Instead they go into the stem,
so they’re fixing it with quite a beefy old clamp inside of that, but nonetheless it means
you can run your favorite aerodynamic flat, road handlebars and not have to worry about any
compatibility issues. The only downside though in my opinion has to be the weight, 430g for the stem alone in a length of 110mm. Yes, it’s heavy but I guess
if it is your only option and there’s no tri bars
available for your favorite normal road handlebars then that could be an option for you. More tech, next week. (drilling) (dinging) It’s now time for the
part of the show called Screw Riding Upgrades Buy Upgrades, where you could be in
with a chance of winning a GCN Camelbak Eddy water bottle. I can’t find it this week, I
reckon that Mr Bridgewood’s got it because well he’s off
on one of his adventures, so who knows exactly
what he’s done with that. Right but we need to first of all announce last week’s winner, and well it was Mike and his Cannondale, so
get in touch with us on Facebook to arrange
the delivery of that. But of course, how can you
get involved in this section? Just simply use the uploader
tool found there in the description below, and submit
before and after photos of your pride and joy
that you’ve upgraded. Now it can be absolutely anything, your bike, your workshop, I
dunno, your clothing attire. It doesn’t matter, just get involved. Now first up this week is Jao from Berlin, I’ve probably said your
name completely incorrectly, but well I do apologize for
that one but please correct me in the comments section down below. Now Jao and his wife celebrated
two years marriage and decided to fulfill her dream
of owning an Italian classic. After spending hours and days
doing what Jao does best, which is apparently wasting
time on e-bay, looking for bike parts that he’s never
going to use or need, Jao found a Colnago
sprint frame in Hungary. Good looking pictures, 49cm
bike, quite hard to find something smaller than a
52 generally, I digress. They decided to give it a shot. 10 days later they got the
frame and the big question came up, classic or post vintage build? The happily married couple went for what they call post classic. I think I’m going to cry. With the help of some close
friends and bike geeks Jao built it up with a new Shamano 105, Shamano 105 threaded headset,
that’s pretty old school, carbon 28mm deep wheels,
Brooks C17 saddle, Ritchie seat posts and Dedder quill stem. Some compact 36cm bars, Supacaz bar tape, this 87 ish Colnago Sprint was turned into a perfect 8.9kg coffee ride machine. It’s their first bike built
from scratch together, and the first of many to come. Right, I’ve got to say actually Jao, with this it is a fantastic looking bike, there is no before and after photos, because really you’ve
just gone out and bought yourself an upgrade straight off the bat, but well, I don’t blame
you, great looking bike. Your wife is a very lucky lady, that is a stunning looking bike. I basically remember
those when I was in my late, well I think late
teens, but early teens, and going into bike
shops and seeing those, you know new old stock
ones still hanging around, really nice going there. Right anyway, the lovebirds are up against Multeh from Malmo in Sweden. Now, Multeh is a 14 year old road racer, he is all into carbon bikes, deep wheels, electronic shifting and
all that modern jazz. When he’s racing in the under 15 races at weekends that is his pride and joy. Either way though he needed
a budget commuter bike for school that was still fast. Multeh found an old
Basso frame set that had been used for a fixie
conversion previously. He decided though to
build it up from old parts laying around in the garage. The only parts that
were bought new were the tubulars and the cassette
to make a complete bike. Parts are from different
eras and the finish isn’t perfect but the
result is a beautiful classic bike that just runs great. Multeh loves the feel of steel
and the downtube shifters. I love the fact you’ve
got a little sort of run around bike that uses
tubular tires as well on that one Multeh, but there
it is, that Basso frame, remember a friend on mine, Mark, he had one of those as
a kid when we raced. I do like the chrome rear end on that, beautiful on the chrome lugs. There we are, Jao and his
wife’s Colnago from Berlin, or Multeh from Malmo in Sweden. Who is it going to be? I don’t decide, you lot at home do. Get involved, top right hand
corner, vote for your favorite. And next week we will tell
you exactly who’s won, and we’ll have two more
battling it out head to head. (whoosing) Bike of the Week now, and
this week I’ve got two bikes which have been on the channel
so far and I reckon it’s going to be a real split
decision on this one. So, first up we’ve got
the Lotus 110 Superbike, a bike which, well, it
broke world records, it was so fast the UCI decided to ban it, and it’s up against the
Wilier Zero SLR Bike, which has just been launched. Now it’s a lightweight
climbing style bike really, and it’s got disc breaks on it. But who are you going to vote for? Vote up there, top right
hand corner, and next week we will reveal the results
of this clash of the titans. (whooshing) It’s now time for the Bike Vault, where we rate your bikes,
either nice or super nice. Well, and this week, as
you can see it’s just me, so I get the final say,
which is absolutely great. No arguing among the presenters. How do you get you bike
though into the Bike Vault? Use the uploader tool found
there in the description below, and well upload pictures of your bike, little bit of information about you, and importantly where you come from, none of this, I’m in my
back garden nonsense, there’s nothing worse than that. We want to cover all four
corners of the globe. And with no further ado, let’s crack on. The first submission this
week comes in from John and this is at the Aga Khan
Museum in Toronto in Canada, a place I’ve never been,
I’ve always wanted to go. Look at that Bianchi Oltre
XR4, I’m pretty sure that is. We’ve, aw this looks good that. It does look good, he
got Bianchi water bottles on there, or Bianchi themed
water bottles, or cages sorry, we’ve got a negative rise
stem there so it looks like a minus 17 or maybe even a minus 20, very, very flat, looks slightly down, and looks like Fulchrum
wheels, maybe campa… I think they’re Fulchrum
Dark Knight wheels, GCN water bottles, bonus points there, I see what you’ve done on that one John, tryna tickle my heart strings, yes, it’s getting a ring of the bell! (ringing) Great looking bike buddy, super nice. Next up is Kevin, from
Seattle, Washington, this is a 1970 Raleigh Grand
Sport 10 speed bicycle. Blimey, didn’t expect to see this. We’ve got a bike which,
it reminds me of a bike I checked out when I was in Japan, and it had like built in
indicators and everything like that, it was a really funky, futuristic 70s electronic bike. Yeah, that’s a cool looking bike. You’ve got some carbon spacers as well, underneath that stem. I didn’t expect to see
any carbon on this bike, it looks like some sort of carbon, carbon rack as well, behind your saddle. I don’t know what that is, let us know, let us know what that is. Silver H Plus Son rims,
they look brilliant. We’ve got a red anodized
jockey wheel on there, a Zefal pump, those were the days, when everyone had those
pumps on their bikes. Red grips to contrast, the
back brake outer cable, we got a green… it’s
such a good looking bike. I was about to say
Michelin tires but they’re Vittoria Rubino Pros with
the red sort of side tread, yeah, you’re going to
get a ring of the bell. (ringing) Nice one Kevin in Seattle. Right, okay next up, Bernardo
in Algarve in Portugal, I love the Algarve in Portugal, Bernardo, invite me out there mate, I want to come and stay, one of my favorite places. This is an Argon 18 Nitrogen Pro. Bernardo has said, excuse the
partially cut steerer because it’s literally the first
ride on a newly built bike. And well, I must say actually,
that normally in the Algarve the skies are a lot bluer than that, but that is a stunning bike, there’s no… decors on the bike or decals. I don’t, is that a custom one? I don’t know, Bernardo
let us know again too in the comments section, I
really do like this bike. That looks like a big stem as well. It looks like a really
sleek racing machine, Envy carbon wheels, course
you’ve got different depths front and rear there, so
you’re getting maximum aerodynamics but you’re not having any compromise on your steering. We’ve got a safety on the rear light, saddle bag, that Power2Max
power meter as well in anodized blue, it looks like one of the Moffett style ones. Absolutely stunning that,
absolutely stunning. (ringing) Ring of the bell, right, hat-trick so far, three out of three. Next up, Harry in Groningen
in the Netherlands, hoh I remember racing
there once upon a time, when I was a very young gentleman. Cannondale Seaco CAAD4,
blimey this is old, this must be what from
94, 95, 96 sort of time? Can’t quite put my finger on it but that, that’s in amazing condition
Harry, how’ve you done that? What is slightly messing
with me a little bit here, is the different bottles on the bikes, we’ve got, again, an Elite Fly bottle on there it looks like,
and we’ve got an Elite, I think it’s Elite anyway,
it might be a Zefal, sort of storage container
on your dome tube, oh sorry seat tube, but I guess you know, it’s better than having a
saddle bag on for some people. Just because of the condition
of that bike, and that saddle I remember them being
on those Cannondales, the condition of it is
absolutely brilliant. Yeah, yeah (ringing) ringing the bell. Scarily close now, to five out of five. So, who’ve we got next? Next up is Shaun from California. Oh my word. A Colnago Arabesque has been dropped in. This, again, how is that
in such good condition? Do you lot not ride your bikes? That is a beauty. The chrome lugs on the head tube, the chrome rear end, bit
like the painted drop outs. Time Equipe Magnesium I
reckon, or Time Equipe pedals, definitely, they look brand new as well. What rims are they? Mavic Open Pros, they
look fantastic as well. Delta brakes. I dunno what that saddle
is, I dunno what it is, but it looks like a,
anyway, mounted below, or fitted below that saddle looks to be a Campag fluted seat post. Cinelli stem. Campag headset, you can
always tell, they’re always a bit bigger than anything else. Right, Benotto handlebar
tape on that, it looks to me. That stuff was scary, it
was shiny, it was nylon, when it rained that stuff,
it just had no grip on it, it was like having butter in
your hands or a bit of soap. We’ve got some gum sidewall
tires, dunno what they are, Bellowplex or Vittoria,
bet my bottom dollar, as you would say, in
California, those white hoods, I can see why you don’t ride
this bike, Shaun, ’cause those white hoods wouldn’t stay white for long, beautiful, absolutely beautiful. And yeah (ringing) five out of five. Super nice. Right, in case you missed it at the start, to get your bike into the Bike Vault, use the uploader tool down below, and make sure you include
everything about you, everything about the bike,
and where you come from. Next week, more Bike Vault. (whooshing) Right, it’s nearly time
for the end of the show, but it’s time actually for
us to have a quick little look at some comments that went underneath videos that went out last week. And first up, under the video of Hank presenting Vincenzo Nibali’s
pro bike in the rain, Savage Poet said, free hub sound check, equals when it rains, it pawls. Of course, a rather good pun, I guess, on the pawls inside of the free hub unit. Also RobbyJr said this bike needs rain, because it looks so hot. Oh yes Robby. And under the Lotus 110 Superbike video Ronny Gordon, Lotus engineers
missed the clear opportunity to introduce the Esprit 007 road bike, which could also go under water. That’s what people in the
90s were really waiting for. All right, there we are, but
do stay tuned to the channel because we’ve got heaps
more great content coming up for you this week, including Hank, he got to check out a
bike that was going for a world record attempt, and
also there’s the final episode of me building up a fixie
that’s going to be used in a challenge on the channel very soon. So do stay tuned for that, and also why not give this video a like, a share and a big thumbs up with your friends. And don’t forget too to
check out the GCN shop at shop.globalcyclingnetwork.com, we’ve got a whole heap of
stuff for you to check out. And now for two more great videos, including that Wilier
that Ollie got to look at, click just down there,
and then the Lotus 110 that was so fast they banned
it, click just down there.