Critérium du Dauphiné, Hammer Series & Dirty Kanza | The Cycling Race News Show

Critérium du Dauphiné, Hammer Series & Dirty Kanza | The Cycling Race News Show


(countdown sound effect) – Welcome to the GCN Racing News Show. This week, the Critérium du Dauphiné starts it of with a bang. (screeching and skidding tires) Ouch. We’ve also got the second round of the Hammer Series in Limburg, a thrilling LOTTO Thüringen Ladies Tour, the Gran Premio Lugano, the Tour Luxembourg, and possibly the one you’re
most looking forward to, the Dirty Kanza, in which our
very own Katherine took part. Now, before we get on to the action from the Critérium du Daupiné prologue, a quick reminder that
we’ve got daily highlights on our Facebook page of the race and we will be showing you all the action and discussing all the
main talking points, so make sure you head over there
after each and every stage. Onto the prologue then,
and the only pace there was set by European time trial
champion Victor Campenaerts, who had abandoned the Giro early in order to concentrate on
the time trials at this race. However, he was quickly
superseded by Jos Van Emden, who had finished the Giro,
and it was the Dutch man who would be on the hot
seat for quite some time. Until, in fact, the
Polish horse came through, Michal Kwiatkowski
stormed round the course in his Polish champions
jersey, taking 1.66 seconds off the time of Van Emden. Team mate Gianni Moscon
came very close slotting to third place, but then after that, there was only really one person capable of stealing the yellow
jersey, Geraint Thomas, who was looking fantastic, until this. (screeching and skidding tires) Ouch, again. It was the worst of
starts for the Welshman but his immense form is quite obvious. Despite laying it down,
he lost just 21 seconds on the day to his team mate Kwiatkowski and actually put time into
the likes of Vincenzo Nibali, Romain Bardet, and Martin. And you would imagine he
probably would have won had he stayed upright. Anyway, this is what Luke Rowe said in a five second summary
at the end of the day. – Good ride by the Polish
horse, took the jersey (clicks tongue) just hoping G’s alright. – Stay tuned for more of
them on our daily highlights. Next up, the Hammer
Series moved from Norway to the Netherlands last
weekend for the Hammer Limburg. The same three day format,
the Hammer climb on day one, followed by the Hammer
sprint, and with the chase on the final day of racing. And there were some
pretty grotty conditions for the first day on the climb. However 11 laps of a
7.7 kilometer circuit, but the race was on right from start all the way to the finish. And putting in a very notable performance was Mark Padun of Bahrain-Merida. He went away with team Sky’s Pavel Sivakov but found himself alone
on the closing lap, taking maximum points
across the finish line, and his power was incredible. Padun is just 21 years
old, he’s a climber, he won the last stage
of the Tour of the Alps just a few weeks ago, and
yet his normalized power, for just under two
hours, he’s 64 kilograms before we get onto this,
was a whopping 390 Watts. Those are the crazy, bonkers
numbers quite frankly. He and Sonny Colbrelli helped
their team, Bahrain-Merida, to victory on the climb. But Mitchelton-Scott, with
Caleb Ewan, Luka Mezgec, dominated the following day sprint, whilst consistency from Quick-Step over those first two days, mean
that they would start first on the final day’s chase. And, like Mitchelton-Scott
the week previous, they were never seen again. The Australian squad did make some erosion to Quick-Step’s lead,
but they weren’t able to make the catch. So, the win went to Quick-Step, and the over all series lead
remains with Mitchelton-Scott. A series in that, which will
conclude with a one day event in Hong Kong in October,
with the former there yet to be decided. We would be very interested
though to hear your thoughts on the three day format
that you’ve seen live on GCN’s Facebook page for
the last couple of weeks. Have you come around to it? Are you a fan, were you always a fan, or is it not really your cup of tea? Either side of the fence,
we would be very interested to hear your thoughts, which you can leave in the comments section just down below. This year marked the 31st edition of the LOTTO Thüringen Ladies Tour, which is a seven day race in Germany, and where they moved to an
earlier slot on the calender, so as to avoid clashes
with other major races, it attracted an even
more star-studded line up than it usually does. Team Sunweb’s Coryn Rivera
finally managed to take the win she’s been waiting for all
year, on day one albeit in a photo finish with Roxane
Fournier of Groupama FDJ. Coryn then held her lead
as jersey through day two, which was won by Elena Cecchini, and extended her advantage on day three, which she also won. Lisa Brennauer won a small
group sprint the following day, but it wasn’t until the
day after that, stage five, that she managed to rest the jersey from the shoulders of Rivera. The longest stage at 141 kilometers came on the penultimate
day, and a late move by 22 year old Alice
Barnes paid off for her as the first win for her
in Canyon-SRAM colors, and arguably, the biggest win
of her short career so far. Well-dones you, Alice. With just seven seconds
separating race leader Brennauer from Ellen van Dijk though,
there was still all to play for on the final stage, which was
an 18 kilometer individual time trial around Schmölln. Van Dijk was favorite, and
she delivered the goods at least in the stage,
she took four seconds out of her team mate Lucinda Brand and then all eyes were on Lisa Brennaur. Could she retain her lead? The answer? Yes, as she finished just
two seconds behind van Dijk in second place on the stage and held onto her yellow
jersey by five seconds, and she also became only the second rider in the history of this race to
win it two years on the trot. Consistency rewarded, I
think you have to say. At least the stage results
were as follows: third, third, second, first, fourth, third, and second. And they will be further rewarded with GCN’s rider of the week award. Which I have no doubt she will
be absolutely delighted with, if anyone tells her that she’s got it. Five riders from Bahrain-Merida made it into the winning break way mid-way through the Gran Premio Lugano on Sunday, including, former Amstel Gold
winner Enrico Gasparotto. And with that strength in numbers, the race was effectively theirs to lose. That said, things didn’t
look quite so comfortable for them when Hermann Pernsteiner, not noted for his sprinting, got away with Kristian Sbaragli, who is. That was another sick lap
of eight around the circuit. They gained an advantage of over a minute and a half on the rest. With one lap to go though, it was clear that the winner would come
from these two at the front, and it was early on that final lap, that Pernsteiner made his move. He attacked on the climb and
then flew down the descent back into Lugano to pick
up his second pro win. Meanwhile, at the Tour de Luxembourg, Italian rider Andrea Pasqualon
was almost as consistent as Lisa Brennauer, at
22nd in the prolouge, was a bit of an anomaly,
but he then went on to take third on the
second and last stages, then two stage wins on
days three and four. Plus, the over all classification. Not a bad haul for the 30 year old from team Wanty-Groupe Gobert. Now, if you are a fan
of Mathieu van der Poel, and you’d like to know what
he’s up to at the moment, the answer, somewhat unsurprisingly, is that he’s quite busy winning. Currently, on the road. He took a win on stage two and
the over all classification of the Boucles de la Mayenne in France. The final two stages there though, were won by Nacer Bouhanni for Cofidis, and it does really feel,
like both he and his team have turned a corner
in the last few weeks, after all, it was a torrid
start to the season, just in time for the Tour de France too. In fact, it’s time for a poll. Will Nacer Bouhanni finally take his maiden tour stage win this year? Let us know. Yes or no, in the poll that
you can find on the screen now. Next up, it’s the infamous Dirty Kanza. A 200 mile annual epic gravel
event in Emporia in Kansas. Last year’s event was won by Mat Stephens. Not that one, obviously, but this year we sent out Katherine, basically because the rest of us probably wouldn’t have
of to the finish line. But Katherine did, in a time
of 19 hours and 42 minutes, an absolutely incredible effort. Well done to you Katherine. This year, conditions
were made even harder by torrential thunderstorms,
so heavy at the start, the organizers delayed it by 30 minutes. The 2000 participants did
eventually get going though and had to thank the
organizers for rerouting around 20 miles of the
course that was made completely unrideable by the rain and mud. An early group of 20
formed in the men’s race including cyclocross legend Sven Nys, but unfortunately, some stomach issues and three punctures were
the end of his challenge. Eventually coming to the fore, was former Cervélo
TestTeam rider, Ted King. He would eventually put 10
minutes into Joshua Barry, stopping the clock at 10 hours,
44 minutes, and 22 seconds. Kaitlin Keough made a fast
start in the women’s event and got into a strong group with the men which gave her a huge initial
advantage over Alison Tetrick. A whopping 15 minutes to be exact, by the 50 mile check point. She would go on to win in a
time of 12 hours and 9 minutes. It wasn’t all plain
sailing for Keough though, who sited throwing up three
times and peeing herself once, amongst the low points of her race. Sounds like a bucketless ride to me. Well done to everyone who
completed the event though, I have the utmost respect for all of you. And finally, we have the
Winston-Salem Cycling Classic in North Carolina. There, the men’s 178
kilometer race was won by Sam Bassetti, a few lengths
in front of Colin Joyce, whilst in the women’s, Lily
Williams managed to out-kick Arlenis Sierra, fresh from
her Tour of California stage win a couple of weeks ago. Right. That is all for this week,
next week we will be back with the rest of the Critérium du Daupiné, the stars of the Tour du Suisse, plus the Ronde van Limburg, and the Rund um Köln. I hope to have your company again then. In the meantime though, why
don’t you check out this video where Katherine goes
through her preparation for the aforementioned Dirty Kanza. You’ll find it just down here.