Clutterless MTB Cockpit with Wireless Shifting and Dropper! | Barspin Ready

Clutterless MTB Cockpit with Wireless Shifting and Dropper! | Barspin Ready


The other day I claimed on instagram that
this trail bike is the only one in the world capable of a bar spin. People got pissed off because that was pretty
arrogant of me. I’ve seen Sam Pilgrims’s ebike tailwhip,
which was most certainly a world first. I just assumed though that he must have disconnected
a bunch of stuff to keep his cables from getting tangled, but in reality Sam devised a pretty
simple solution: extend all the cables, forego a dropper post, and run the front brake through
the stem like a dirt jumper. Sure, it’s a little messy, but cable tidiness
can take a back seat to ebike tailwhips any day. But I was excited about my new hardtail modifications. This is certainly one of the least cluttered
cockpits I’ve ever seen on a trail bike, considering it still has a dropper lever,
front and rear brakes, and an 11 speed drivetrain. The bike also functions the same if you spin
the bars all the way around. That’s the key point I was trying to make. If you’ve ever crashed your trail bike and
had this happen, you know it’s not pretty. The front brake hose can get damaged from
hitting the frame, and gear cables can get pulled and twisted up causing problems with
your shifting. So, it’s time to get back in the hack shack
for a little project. Today we’re going to do something kind of
silly and expensive, for the sake of learning and having fun. We’ll start with this special stem cap and
star nut that Eric Porter sent me. It’s designed for BMX and dirt jump bikes,
but will work on any fork including this MRP Ribbon air, which I’ll be testing. The purpose of this special piece is to run
the front brake hose through the steerer tube, keeping it free and clear of the frame when
the bars spin around. The little notches in the star nut, and the
angled hole in the cap make everything look and work like they belong there. As for the rear brake hose I’m simply installing
a longer one. This should be good for two spins in either
direction without causing any damage or impacting performance. I’ll just install new ends on these hoses,
hook them up to the levers, and fill them up with TRP mineral oil. Easy, done. Now for the shifting, which is gonna get interesting. This is the archer components D1x, which allows
you to add wireless electronic shifting to any derailleur including my 11 speed box two. The system has two components; this bluetooth
transmitter which gets mounted on your bars, and this control module which pulls on your
shift cable using a servo. I tried to bury it inside the frame, but it
didn’t fit. Archer recommends mounting it to the underside
of the chainstay which is what I eventually did. Once the D1x is mounted and hooked up, you
program it through the app. It has you shift through your gears one by
one, and make little adjustments to ensure the derailleur is aligned with the cassette. If any one gear is acting up, you can fine
tune it and correct the issue. Pretty amazing for such a small company to
create an app that works so well. GoPro should take note. I asked Archer Components why people would
want this system and they acknowledged that it was for specific cases. For instance some recumbent bikes have like
7 foot shift cables, and this is a lot easier. Also people with thumb problems that would
make it difficult to use a normal shifter, like me three days ago. There are also guys like No Front Brakes,
who need to rely on one hand to do everything. Just pushing some little buttons could actually
make thing easier for him, and I’d be interested to see if it does. On my bike it shifts incredibly smooth, better
than any lever I’ve ever seen, but time will tell how reliable it is. So far so good. So now we’re left with the easiest problem
to solve, the dropper post. This wireless Magura seat post was also an
Eric Porter contribution, and I’ve been using it for months now. Easiest dropper install ever. The dropper itself charges with micro usb,
and the thumb switch has a replaceable battery. It’s surprisingly reliable, low profile,
and perfect for this application. Now that everything is hooked up I can give
this bike a test ride. This is a lift barspin, which you could learn
in an afternoon on a BMX or dirt jump bike. Just lift the front wheel, pinch the seat
with your legs, and throw the bars. Of course you have to catch them which is
always easier with a cleaner cockpit. So far my new creation is working as planned,
but to get the most out of it, I’ll need to put myself to the test. I’m doing some test runs out of this concrete
bowl, because I want to spin my bars while in the air. I haven’t done this in like 20 years, and
the last time I attempted it I jammed my finger. So today I’m being cautious and landing
on the deck of this concrete bowl. This is known as a fly out, and it’s a great
way to learn tricks since it gives you a fair bit of air time for barely any forward speed
upon landing. So maybe not a world first, but there’s
definitely no bike out there like this one. I would have tested this beast on the trails,
but it’ll be another few days before the dirt around here is ready to see tires. Until then I’m just gonna stare at this
bike in all its uncluttered wonder. If you want to know more about the D1x or
anything else in this video, check the description for a summary. Thanks for riding with me today, and I’ll
see you next time.