Chris Opie’s Presenter Bike | Pinarello Dogma K10

Chris Opie’s Presenter Bike | Pinarello Dogma K10


(relaxed music) – This is my Pinarello Dogma K10 Disk, and it’s quite unique for a road bike, but I’m going to tell you
exactly why in just a second. I’ve had it for around six weeks now, I’ve made a few changes and I’m going to to tell
you all about those as well. (logo whooshing) (relaxed music) Let’s start off with the obvious, why is this bike so unique? Well the Pinarello Dogma
K10 features the DSS system, which is the Dogma Suspension System. And that affords me 10
millimeters of rear-wheel travel via an elastomer system in here. Unlike mountain bikes or other
bikes with suspension though the bike doesn’t actually
have any pivot points, instead the flex comes from
the Pinarello FlexStays just down here. 10 millimeters does not sound like a lot, but, on a day to day ride,
you’ll really notice the benefits from just having that little
extra bit of cushioning at the rear end. Now it seems like a
weird choice for someone that’s always chosen an aero bike and always wanted to go as
fast as possible, perhaps. The bike is still very aerodynamic, featuring almost 90% of
the same aero benefits as the Dogma F12, which
I had before this one. But I’m riding a lot more
than I used to at the moment, nearly three times what
I was doing last year. And I thought it’d be really interesting just to try something new. And I’m really pleased
that I’ve gone out there and tried something that
is a little different because I actually quite
liked a comfortable ride. So believe it or not, I am one meter, 78. And this is a 53 centimeter frame, it has a 73.7 degree seat angle and a 72 degree head angle. And my saddle high is 75 centimeters from the center of the top of the saddle down to the bottom bracket axle, the center of the axle again. The main frame is constructed from Pinarello’s Torayca 1100-1K
carbon which they use. I have a 130 millimeter
stem up on the front. And something that I’ve
trialed on this bike, which I haven’t done before, is actually a narrower set of bars. These are 40 centimeters from end to end. And at the top of the hoods they probably measure
closer to 38 centimeters as the bars are ever slightly flared to get a more aerodynamic position. It’s something that I never
would have tried in the past because I was a big fan
of 42 centimeter bars. But actually having been in a wind tunnel and noticed how much
faster it will make you, how many watts it saving you, and not really noticing a difference when it comes to the handling I don’t think I’d go back
to the 42 centimeters as a preference anymore. Mounted on top of the Most
Talon bar and stem is my Wahoo. Now it’s quite weird, these
days, to see a Wahoo on a stem and not at the front, but
that’s because I choose to run lights on this bike quite often, and actually prefer the
vision of the lights not obscured by the Wahoo when
it’s on an out front mount. These bars are ever so
slightly aero-flared in the drop as well. Again, aiding to a little
bit of extra speed for free. Mounted on the bars are the
current model of Dura Ace lever, that’s running a 22 speed
groupset with a 50/34 up front and 11/28 out back. The only reason I’m
actually currently running a 50/34 set up up front
is because they were the only rings available
for that power meter and I really like riding to power. It effectively means I’m
only missing out on one gear. I’d choose to run a 53/39
these days if I had the choice. Now, personally, I am a
huge fan of disc brakes, but recently I’ve been
experimenting a little bit because I have a theory. I think that smaller
rotors not only squeal more but they are also less effective. So I swapped out the Zip 303s with the 160 mill rotors
that this bike came with and dropped in some Vision 55 Sls with 140 mil rotors to try this out. On those I’ve got
Continental’s GP 5000 tires. Few other things to note, I’m using a Fizik Arione
saddle up the top. It’s always been my saddle of preference. I’m currently using my own pedals and my crank length is 170 mill. And my bike, as you currently
see it, weighs 8.58 kilos. So there you have it, this is
my Pinarello Dogma K10 Disc. Let me know your thoughts
down in the comments below. Give this video a thumbs
up if you enjoyed it. But before you go I really
want to know in the poll, up there, on the top right hand corner of your screen right now, would you choose speed or
would you choose comfort? Oh, there’s one final
thing to do, isn’t there? In this situation. That’s the freehub soundcheck. (wheel whirring) That sounds pretty aggressive to me.