Chris Opie’s Orbea Orca Aero Presenter Bike

Chris Opie’s Orbea Orca Aero Presenter Bike


(logo whooshes) – Finally, after over seven months, I get to give you a proper
look around my Orbea Orca Aero. I turned up at the GCN HQ
on the 1st of June last year and we’ve been together ever since. (upbeat music) This bike is really special to me because I had some amazing experiences whilst riding it last summer. Not only that, but I was also
fitter than I ever had been as I’d just stopped racing
but I was a lot fresher which meant I could go
out on any day of the week and set loads of new PBs and who doesn’t like going faster than they’ve ever gone before. And finally, part of this bike holds an unofficial world
record thanks to Emma Pooley who borrowed a couple
of bits of my groupset when she set her hour record, her uphill hour record recently in Oman. So here it is, my Orbea Orca Aero in bright red and valley green. Not only my first Orbea but my
first Spanish bike full stop. (upbeat music) I’m not quite sure who came
up with the color scheme and at first I was a little bit unsure but having spent a lot of time riding it, and a lot of time
watching it on the videos, I now absolutely love it. The way it stands out and pops
against almost any background is my absolute favorite thing about it. It’s just a mega bold color
choice that I completely adore. Right, let’s take a closer look and start up top with my saddle. And I finally get to openly
use my favorite saddle of all time, the Fizik Arione. I like it because it’s got
the flexi wings on the sides and I just find that really comfortable. When I raced, I use the
heavily padded version and I had to black out all the details because of course we weren’t
sponsored by Fizik at the time. I find the flat top is perfect
for sliding around the saddle and getting that perfect position for every pedaling situation. Moving to the front of the bike and I’ve got the Vision
Metron 5D sprint style bar which is mega beefy and stiff which is probably why I like it. It’s got a 120 mil stem,
although it looks shorter because the stem kind of
flares from around 3/4 of the way up to the bar. The bar is a 420 millimeters
wide which is great for the confidence when you’re descending. Onto the levers and I run my
Shimano Dura Ace Di2 levers a little bit higher up on the bar than I would have when I was racing, I used to keep them low ’cause
it was aero, apparently. And I wind the brake lever quite far in, I don’t have small hands,
but I really like the feeling of having the brake lever
right underneath my fingertips when I’m racing, or riding at any point for that matter these days. Something I started doing
years ago on my mountain bike but I’ve only recently in the last couple of seasons done it on the road and I found it to be a really
big enhancement of confidence. I run my sticky Fizik
bar tape wrapped back as thin as possible and
this is again for a feeling of confidence and control,
especially on the descent. I have my stem slammed as
low as it’ll go on this bike and that is because, if
I was being really fussy, it’s perhaps one size too big and I may have chosen a 51, this is a 53, but I’m not racing anymore
so it’s not a major issue. And also, this bike is mega comfortable and because it’s that little
bit bigger at the front, I ride in the drops more
which is again great for confidence on the descent. Generally speaking, I
only run one bottle cage on my bike now, now that
I don’t ride any further than a couple of hours at a time, I don’t feel the need for two. But, you can see that
I’ve borrowed it actually for another bike at the moment. That’ll be back there soon enough though. Moving down to the wheels and I’ve got the Zipp
404 Firecrests on here with the big wide decals and that really recognizable
golf ball textured rim surface. They’ve got the
show-stopper braking surface on there as well and
mounted to those wheels are the Continental GP 4000 2 S tires. I’ve got a 25 mil in the back but up front I’ve got a
28 mil and that’s again for the handling and the
confidence on the big descends that we did in the summer. In the tires I’m riding 65 to
85 psi or 4 1/2 to 5 1/2 bar, depending on the road
surface and the weather and things like that. And this is all again setup to
aid the handling of the bike. Moving down to the gearing and my Shimano Dura Ace Di2
shifts an 11-28 cassette on the back which is a standard cassette and it’s got a lovely spread across it. Up the front though is
a 50-34 and at the time, this was the lowest
gear I’d ever been given and I didn’t think I was
gonna enjoy using it, but we did so many mountainous
rides in the summer that I learned to love it
and in fact, I needed it. I really thought I was
gonna spin out on the 50 but unless you’re doin’ 55
Ks an hour consistently, then it’s more than enough to be honest. My cranks are 172 1/2 millimeters. I would normally choose 170s but I actually quite enjoyed
slightly longer cranks. The brakes are direct mount
Shimano 9100 Dura Ace calipers and I like to run them
quite wide off the rim. And I do that because I
like them to bite just before the lever touches the bar. And finally, the pedals are a
leftover from my pro-career. They are the Speedplay
Zero Aero Titanium pedals and they’re single sided,
clip-in pedals, quite standard, quite minimalistic, they
look pretty cool on the bike. Right then, the all important weight test. I reckon it’s around 7 1/2 kilos, 7.37. So that’s it, that’s the
in depth look at my bike. There’s a few other things to note, it’s a 53 centimeter frame and my saddle height is 745 millimeters. So there you go, it’s a wrap and hopefully you’ve
noticed I’ve set the bike up to handle well, be good fun to ride and just to be really
confidence inspiring. If you enjoyed watching this video as much as I enjoyed riding it, make sure you give me a big thumbs up and if you want to see my
groupset, set a world record, why not check out Emma’s
Oman video down there?