Changing Road Bike Wheel Freehubs & Lubing Jockey Wheels | GCN Tech Clinic #AskGCNTech

Changing Road Bike Wheel Freehubs & Lubing Jockey Wheels | GCN Tech Clinic #AskGCNTech


(metallic swooshing) – Welcome back to the GCN Tech Clinic, where we’ll try and
solve your bike problems that have been pestering
you and have stopped you getting out on the bike
and enjoying yourself, so if you’ve got one,
leave it for me down there in the comment section below, and also, why not try and leave me one
on all forms of social media, using the hashtag #ASKGCNTECH. With no further ado let’s have
the first question this week, and it comes in from
Jason F, who says they “currently have a Mavic
wheelset with the XDR hub “that they use on a bike with SRAM AXS, “they want to start using
the wheelset on a winter bike “which has a Shimano groupset, “what are the steps of doing this? “Is it as easy as just replacing
the cassette on the wheels “to the 11:30 Shimano
cassette that they have? “Or does Jason need to
change the hub as well, “for it to be compatible? “Do you have to use a
specific wheelhub for Shimano “versus Campagnolo versus SRAM groupsets? “They’re all a bit confusing for me.” Right, I’m going to answer
this one, and hopefully it solves all these questions
you’ve got there, so; you’ve got that SRAM
12-speed on there you say, because you’re using AXS, so you’re using a special XDR driver on
the body, the freehub body, so with that, if you
take off your cassette, you can’t put a Shimano one on there because it just doesn’t fit
the splines or anything. So, you can’t also use that wheel with your Shimano groupset
because that’s 11-speed, and you’ve got a 12-speed
cassette on there, so it’s not going to work. So, your only option here is to actually remove the freehub body, and
then put a new one on there, so a Shimano compatible
one, so for that, XD driver or an XDR driver. It’s fairly simple to do,
in fact I’m pretty sure the wheels you’ve got are
probably even the tool-free ones, so it’s nice and easy,
you don’t have to unlock or undo anything whatsoever,
you simply pop off an end-cap, you pull off the freehub
body, put the other one on, put the cassette on and
go, and you are happy. Now, your other question
on there was asking about one which works on SRAM,
Campagnolo and Shimano, I think that’s what you meant by it; no, there’s nothing really
because the latest versions of SRAM and Campagnolo are
12-speed, Shimano’s 11-speed… Shimano and SRAM, normal cassettes, they use the same fitting system, so it’s the same sort of spline pattern, Campagnolo uses a deeper one. There are some hubs out
there, I think it was PMP, possibly an Italian
brand, who had something that worked with both
types, probably wasn’t PMP, I think I just made that or imagined that, but it was definitely one of
their, Miche, possibly Miche, they did something that
worked with both cassettes, but, it wouldn’t of course work with that SRAM 12-speed cassette, because they use a very
small cog on there, that simply won’t go onto a
standard diameter freehub body. Hopefully, that’ll see
you all right though with those answers,
essentially in essence, you need to get yourself
a Shimano freehub body for those Mavic wheels. Right, next we’ve got Ron
Gatenby, or Gatenby, who says “do you have to do anything special “with your front derailleur if you want “to try an oval front ring setup?” Right then Ron, thinking
about going oval, are we? Nothing major to do here,
what you do want to do though, is rotate your cranks, so that
the chain ring is in its most ovallised position I
guess, where it goes near the front derailleur, so you want it so it’s at the high point if you like, of those rings. You then need to adjust the
front derailleur up slightly, probably, just so it can
clear it, ’cause obviously if you don’t, if you try
and shift it, it’s just going to bash against the
inside of the chain ring and probably render
the front mech useless, and scratch it up, if not that. So that’s really all
you need to worry about, something to consider though,
is when you are changing gear, it’s probably not going to
be quite as silky smooth as a chain set is from the
factory, because generally you’re asking it to jump
just slightly higher, of course if you’re using
an oval inner ring as well, it kind of is all right, but
it’s not, it’s never quite perfect, you know, it’s
like, it’s almost perfect, but it’s just like a
hair’s width difference. Yes, so you use your legs
almost as a clutch mechanism if you like, so just back
off the gas a little bit, so just ease off, and allow
the chain just to climb up, and then lay down those watts again. Next up is Yahya Baali,
that is a cool name. Really cool name. “Hi Jon, I was wondering
for pulley wheels. “Do I need to lube them
after cleaning my bike? “I usually remove all
the grime from the teeth, “and then dry them. I don’t know if I have “cartridge bearings or
not. It’s the original “pulley wheels that came on
my R8000 mech. Thank you, “and have a great day.” Right, pretty sure they are
cartridge bearings in there, either way if they’re cartridge, or you use the standard ceramic bushes, I always like to give
them a little bit of lube after I wash the bike, so
make sure it’s nice and dry, then this is the only time I would suggest laying your bike on its side, if you’ve watched anything
of mine before you’ll know there’s a few things I don’t
like; one is noisy bikes, one is bikes upside
down, and the other one is leaning bikes on their side, basically. You want to work on a bike when it’s in it’s right place but, if you want to lube those
pulley wheels, obviously you don’t want to take them
out of the mech each time, ’cause it’s bit troublesome,
bit of a hassle really, so, lean the bike on its side,
get yourself some chain lube, something like in a bottle.
I prefer to use a bottle than an aerosol for
this, because it’s just, you can control it a lot easier,
because aerosols obviously it blasts out and you
can’t sort-of control that quite as easily, so get
the rear mech there, and just apply a few drops
to each one, and then with the bike back up in
its natural, normal state, just back-pedal a little bit,
but before you back-pedal, you want to allow that chain
lube, you can use dry, wet doesn’t really matter, just
to soak in a bit more really, so that all of the bearings are going to get a nice coating there, and like I say if you’re not using a
sealed bearing in there, it will find its way
into the bushing, too. Sealed bearings; they are sealed obviously that’s the name of them,
but generally it will just help it a little bit as
well, and it could well just flush out any of the grime too. Now we’ve got Milos Duric,
who says “Hello to all at GCN, “great show as always! The
thing I see a lot of debate “about on forums”–
Right, first off, forums. They can be an absolute
minefield of information. We’re not going to go there today, though. Anyway, “a lot of debate,
about replacing the chain “before doing the same
thing with cassettes. “Many people have had
skipping issues, and claim “that a new cassette is almost a must “when you replace the chain. “Does the new chain/old cassette
combo need breaking in?” Right, I’m going to set
something straight here, from my own experience, I’ve been cycling for quite some time now. No, you don’t need to break
it in at all, providing you’ve replaced your chain in time, if you’ve let it wear away,
now chains don’t stretch, people say they stretch,
they don’t, they wear, okay. The two things are pretty different. I’ve already, I can feel
the comment section below getting lit up, right,
because I’ve just said that. Anyway, provided you’ve
replaced your chain in time it’s not necessary to
put a new cassette on. One of the easiest and
most simplest things that everybody out there can do, and I’m going to get on
my soap box, just quickly, is just wash your bikes,
take real care of them, your drive chain, it is in the firing line of all the rubbish that
comes up off the road; the salt, the grit, the
sand, the dirt, everything, and when it gets inside the chain that acts like a cutting paste on your beautiful chain rings,
your expensive cassette, your pulley wheels, everything,
and it starts to wear out. Get yourself some de-greaser,
and just spray it over when your chain starts to get manky, and give it a good clean, and everything is going
to last way longer. Now, you say this about
casettes need replacing; I reckon I’ve had cassettes,
where I’ve probably replaced the chain five
times before I’ve needed to replace the cassette,
so I’ve had five new chains for each cassette, that’s
how long they can last if you take really good care of it. Yeah, this one is going
to get heated down below in the comments. Go easy. Now we’ve got Dmitrijs
Starikovs, who says, “Hi there, not sure if
this is tech, maintenance, “other issue.” You’ve come to the right
place, whatever it is! Right Dmitrijs; “autumn
riding comes with wet riding.” Awful isn’t it! “Lately when I’m riding in
the wet my wheel brake tracks, “rim brakes, get covered in oily gunk, “almost like the one you get on the chain. “Braking performance suffers, “not to mention the pain to get it off. “Am I doing something incorrectly? “Or are the roads that dirty? “It’s not my chain, as the
front wheel gets as dirty “as the rear one.” Right, Dmitrijs, perfectly normal, mate. What’s happening is a
combination of you braking, and the water, basically
it’s deteriorating your brake pads, that
oily gunk is actually your brake pads wearing out. Disc brake users, they’re
sat right now, going “ha ha ha, Dmitrijs! “Seriously mate, get
yourself some disc brakes.” But, don’t worry about it, okay, yeah, it does make a horrible mess, and braking performance is
probably affected slightly, I mean, at the end of the
day, you’re in the wet, so it’s never going to be
quite as good as it could be, but, don’t worry about it too much, because when you brake, your brake pads, more often than not they
have little grooves in them and those grooves move the
water away from the rim, and then they fall down, and that’s why if you look on your front
fork, you’ll quite often have bits of this
horrible like gunky mess, which you’re talking about
there, like black, gray grime, down the fork legs because it’s come out, and the pressure of the
wheel has pushed it back, and it’s run down there, same
thing happens on the rear. Now that stuff is really
easy to get off the frame and forks, unless you’ve
got a matte frame. Not quite as simple, if
you have got a matte frame by the way and you’ve got
that; WD40 bike cleaner, really good for that, tends
to get it off really well, but we were talking
about your rims, okay… What I use for it is
nice, hot soapy water. And get yourself a scouring pad, it depends where you’re
from, it could well be called Scotch Brite, I think
it’s called, and use that, now it’s quite abrasive,
its the sort of thing which you’re clean the
bottom of your cooking pots or pans if you burn a lot of food, which I’m quite experienced
at as well, anyway, you get that, and apply a
decent amount of pressure, but make sure, right, you
stay away from the actual side wall of your tire,
because it’s quite abrasive, like I said, and you
could well damage that. Likewise, if you’ve got black
rims, or any colored rims, that sort of thing, you want to try and stay away from that
too, so try and break it off into little bits perhaps, just apply a really small amount of pressure
and just work through it, because what happens is all that oily gunk is getting caught in
the very small grooves on your braking surfaces
normally, and what happens is it gets stuck in there,
and there’s one bit where it always gets stuck,
and that is just at the very top lip of the rim, just where
it meets onto the side wall of the tire, that tends
to get real messy as well, so with that just use a
sponge again, hot water, try and get it as hot as
possible ’cause that tends to shift that grime, now,
you don’t want it so hot you’re going to burn your
hands, in that case get a pair of marigolds, you know the
rubber gloves you would do the washing up with as well, so, yeah, when you’ve finished
with the scouring pad, when you’ve cleaned out your burnt pads you can just go straight off
and wash your bike with it. I’m only joking, but, that’s
the sort of thing you need, really, just to protect
your hands from it, cause hot water makes a big,
big difference with this. Importantly here, you’re
not doing anything wrong, it happens to everyone out
there who uses rim brakes, and when it starts to
wear away, your rim brakes you get through them
so quickly those pads, I remember my dad on his
commute, he used to get through in the winter, sometimes a pair every, probably every 10 days, with
V-brakes on his mountain bike that’s how quick they used to wear down, you know in traffic, stop,
start, stop, start, but yeah, not doing anything wrong, it just requires good old fashioned elbow-grease. Right, final one this week
comes in from Pianowcascade. I often wonder, and I’ve said it before, where do you lot get your names from? Right, anyway, Pianowcascade says, “will a down tube tension shifter work “with a Positron Shimano rear derailleur?” Right, we are stepping back in time now, about 37 years, I think,
Shimano Positron, I think from 1982, 1983, so, a
very basic rear derailleur I guess you could say,
so it’s not indexed, or anything like that. A down tube shifter, which you’ve said, down tube tension shifter,
with that, I’m not sure if you mean a friction
or an indexed one because they’re both under
tension at some point, but I’m pretty sure it’ll work absolutely fine with six, seven, eight
speed, something like that, well I reckon six and seven, definitely. How well it would work with
a 10-speed down tube shifter I don’t know, because
remember it does work on a parallelogram-style design,
and I don’t know how much movement it has to actually
be able to play around with, but it should work absolutely fine, this is the time, really
when I want a thorough ask-the-audience, will a
down tube tension shifter work with a Positron rear derailleur? I was only two years old when
that product was released, so I don’t have much experience, I have actually maintained
one, and those derailleurs back then were actually designed to work for a friction shifter but,
index shifters were introduced not that long after, and they
still worked fine with it, and on an old bike somewhere,
I think it’s at my mate Alice’s house, I’ve even got one of those Positron rear mechs on
there or something very, very similar, and it’s got
an indexed down tube system on there, I think it’s
got eight speed on there, so I reckon you’ll be okay
up to eight, anything more, (inhales sharply) well
yeah, we’re treading into murky waters ’cause
I’ve never tried it myself. Right, there we are, I hope
that answered that question, if not, someone else,
MrGrumpy53, MrGrumpy53 a regular commenter, you
will definitely be able to help that one out,
because you seem to know about a lot of this old stuff, too. Get involved in the comment
section, and like I said at the start, if you’ve
got a bike-related problem, let me know about it down
there in the comment section and I will do my utmost
best to try and solve it in a forthcoming episode.
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