Carbon MTB Wheels In The Workshop & On The Trail | GMBN’s First Look At The ENVE M6 & M7 Series Rims

Carbon MTB Wheels In The Workshop & On The Trail | GMBN’s First Look At The ENVE M6 & M7 Series Rims


(rock music) (pedals spinning) – Carbon mountain bike wheels have become a lot more popular in the last few years. And it’s easy to see why. They’re really light, and offer a very responsive and accurate ride. They’re also super strong,
but this has it’s drawbacks because it’s actually drawn weaknesses to other parts of the
bike, like the tyres. So with that in mind, we’re gonna talk about the new ENVE M6 and M7 series rims. Which have got a couple of really cool features up their sleeve. So this is the M6 series rim and there are three options in this,
the 30, 35, and the 40. That corresponds to
the internal rim width. On this particular one,
the 30 is 30 millimetres and of course the other
two models, 35 and 40. Now all three models have this incredibly wide side rule on them. It’s hookless bead system. It’s 4.5 mil wide on both sides here. So that is incredibly
strong and to dissipate that energy from impacts and rocks and ground and that sort of thing. And what that does is that actually makes for a very, very strong wheel. And the effect of that
is when you do manage to sort of bottom out the
tyre on that obstacle, it’s got a far greater surface there so it’s not gonna be pinched or split open like can happen with a thinner, traditional side wall profile. So that was the M6 system, so that is dedicated for trail use. This is the M7, so this
is the Enduro race wheel. Comes in three options, the
30, the 35, and the 35 E. Of course that stands for E-bikes. So the 30 and the 35 stand
for the internal rim width. 30 in this case, between the two. And you notice it’s got a bit of a different rim system on here. So this is the dedicated
rim strip system that ENVE have developed and
this patent pending device is absolutely key to how
this system operates. So the side walls itself are actually 5 millimetres wide now. And you have to use a rim
with this rim strip system. By using this, it completely
integrates a tubeless system so the tyre itself becomes
part of the rim strip. So the tyre itself mounts to the rim strip as you can see here if I just
peel it back from the rim. You see by doing so, it actually
is completely unaffected by what happens to the rim itself. So that’s good for two reasons. Firstly, you’ve got this really, really wide rim surface here. So even more sort of pinch resistance against flat surfaces and rocks, but also, in a race
situation, if you do manage to crack the rim itself, because the tyre rim system
is completely separate, you’re not gonna lose tyre pressure. You’re so good in fact, that ENVE says, 100% pinch improvement,
over other designs. – So these are the M6
30s, mounted to my bike and as Doddy’s already explained you’ve got that wide bead to try and stop that force puncturing the tyre. But also something I noticed is that a 30 mil width does look quite wide. It does give you a nice shape to the tyre, but also that relatively
wide inside measurement is gonna mean the bead of
the tyre is further apart. And that does make a difference, especially on tubeless tyres, ’cause it fits so close together, the tyre can roll around a bit. And it does mean that
that bead can pop off a little bit and burp your tyre so a nice wide spread does
give you a more stable tyre. Now we’ve seen a few
people come to the market with things that go inside you tyre to try and stop punctures, that sort of common problem with really stiff wheels. But ENVE are trying to use the actually rim technology to do that. And what that does mean, is
you can run normal tyres, say not having to put
heavy weight tyres on there to try and prevent pinch punctures. So I’ve got my normal
tyre set up on this bike I’ve got a 2.4 front and rear, I’ve got a 28 psi in the back, 26 up front so I’m gonna take it for a ride and have a look at the characteristics. (upbeat electronic music) So I’m definitely a fan
of lightweight wheels. Beyond the actual weight of
your bike it makes the bike feel really light and super agile for peddling, braking, and cornering it does make a difference. Also, stiff wheels in cornering does help. Something I especially
noticed was I rutted tracks and sometimes your back wheel might drag along side of the rut and it sort of goes “bonk, bonk, bonk” and then up. Carbon rim is much more direct. I do know from previous
experience that I do like a light weight rim and tyre setup, but I also know that it
does lead to punctures. Like if (mumbles) were ready
with a lighter weight tyre and a couple with a stiff rim, we know that can lead to puncture. So, be nice to ride
these through the rocks to see how they perform. It’s also interesting
to note that ENVE say that this puncture resistant technology is weight neutral, so both
on these M6 and the M7 with their protective rim strip, the rims have been re-engineered so it doesn’t add any weight to them. (upbeat electronic music) It’s definitely in these
really rocky sections like this where that extra volume of the tyre really pays off for that absorption. I’m still running my normal tyre pressures and as of yet I’ve not
actually bottomed out the rim onto the rocks yet. It’s definitely situations
like this, especially in the Enduro races where I’ve
put a bit more pressure in my tyres, just to make
sure I don’t pinch that tyre or a puncture could ruin the race for me. But, I think I’m gonna
have to let them down a little bit now, just to get a feel for that rim bottoming out on a rock. And let’s see if I get a puncture. (upbeat electronic music) So it definitely bottomed out
that rear tyre a few times and I’m running unrealistic tyre pressures for myself, to be honest, that low and I don’t really like
it in corners anyway ’cause I feel the tyre deforming. So I’m definitely running
them a little bit harder. So in the old days, on alloy rims, when you start bottoming
out that rim into rocks you definitely started to
buckle the wheel eventually, but also you could sort of
bend the side of that rim over and that can lead to problems
sealing with tubeless tyres. However, on this carbon rim,
I’ve still got full pressure. So now this is the M7 30 with
a tyre mounted on my bike. This is their Enduro and/or mountain rim. So you can just see the edge
of that protective rim strip and the tyre sits inside that, so it does give that
absorption of those big hits. But also it provides
the seal for that tyre. So in the case of a rim break, hopefully that tire’s still
gonna stay seated inside there and you’ll keep some
pressure in that tyre. So it’s also very simple
to mount your tyre. That protective rim strip takes
the place of any rim tape. Just use a normal tubeless valve, get your tyre inside the
rim, put you fluid in there, and the tyre should pump up pretty easily. So this protective rim strip is designed, but also manufactured in Utah, as well as all of ENVE’s rims. And they say that it out performs any of those after market tyre inserts that are designed to
stop you from puncturing. Don’t forget, it’s also weight neutral. It’s also interesting
to know that ENVE say that these rims are pinch
resistant beyond impact strength. So that means that you
shouldn’t lose any pressure in the tyre, even if you damage that rim, which is very important
for those racers out there. Also, on that note, ENVE
offer a 5 year warranty, and lifetime crash
replacement on these rims. So any damage occurs whilst riding, it’s covered by the warranty,
yes, even impact damage. So that’s the new rims from ENVE with some pretty innovative technology to help prevent punctures. If you want to see some
more videos, click up there, for a factory tour of Continental, where you see the technology
that goes into the tyres. Click down there for
some hacks to help you seat your tubeless tyres. Click on the logo to subscribe. Give us thumbs up if you
like ENVE’s new rims.