Can Your Bike Be Too Good For You? | The GCN Tech Show Ep. 13

Can Your Bike Be Too Good For You? | The GCN Tech Show Ep. 13


– Hello and welcome to the GCN Tech Show. (electronic wooshing) This week we are asking the question, can a bike be too good for it’s rider? Some interesting answers
to that one for sure. We have a load of great
new tech of course, including stuff from SOM
and Officina Battaglin among others, and we’re
also inducting a new product onto the GCN Wall of Fame. (upbeat music) (electronic wooshing) So, what is hot in the
tech world this week then? Well, no pun intended,
but Shimano, literally. There’s been a fire at
the OsakA-Sakai City manufacturing plant, reportedly
in the anodizing section. 200 employees had to be evacuated. Over 25 trucks turned up. Fortunately, no casualties
have been reported. We just have to hope now I
guess that the fire doesn’t have any knock on effects onto
their production capacity. I don’t know how that would
effect the bike industry as a whole, but I can imagine
it wouldn’t be all that good. Right, now moving on,
have a look at this photo and tell me what you see. Look Keo pedals for start,
but have a look again. Yeah, I can see it with the eye there, but according to the Twitter feed of Lotto Soudal pro Adam Hansen, these are formally top
secret SRM powermeter pedals. Now, we have no details whatsoever, but given the SRM’s
reputation, you have to imagine there’s some pretty
rock solid tech in there in order to warrant a move away from their crank based
measurement systems. Although, having said that actually, the powermeter market has
swamped somewhat in recent years, and the patent that SRM
had that allowed them almost a monopoly for
a long time actually, elapsed a number of years ago now. So, maybe this is just another move to try and get ahead of the competition. By the way, we will see if we can do some investigating at the Giro d’Italia. Now, speaking of the Giro d’Italia, the name, if you’ve been
around the sport for a while, Giovanni Battaglin should
sound familiar to you, or at least it would sound familiar if I could pronounce it correctly. But anyway, Battaglin was
a former professional rider who won the Giro Vuelta double in 1981, making him something of a legend. Anyway, brilliantly, after
he retried from pro racing he then went on to build bikes, brazing beautiful steel frames including, for riders like Stephen Roche, who famously won the Giro
Tour Worlds triple in 1987 on a bike that latterly survived the Matt Stephen’s
treatment 27 years later. Anyway, all that’s to say
that Officina Battaglin have just launched their
first ever disk frameset. It’s called the Power Plus Disk and like all the Battaglins, it is still made from steel in Italy. This one is made from
Columbus Spirit HSS tubing. Columbus, being another
Italian brand of course. I don’t know about you, but I think that is one stunning looking frameset. Now, speaking of which,
you might have noticed that John is not here today. Not that John is a
stunning looking frameset, I mean no offense John, but
anyway, John is not here, but he was at the Volta a
Catalunya, and while he was there, he spotted another
stunning Italian frameset. That’s the lick. Among other things, anyway,
hope to see you John. Oh God I’m getting flustered. – Now I’ve just grabbed
this De Rosa Protos from Israel Cycling
Academy rider Zak Dempster, and basically, first of all I wanna mention the stunning paint work. If you look up close, I’m hoping that my camera man can get this
stunning glittery paint work. It really does pop and stand out. Now, let’s move onto
the actual bike though. Well, we’ve got a Shimano
Dura-Ace 9150 groupset, some Vision wheels,
Schwalbe tubular tires, and then the power meter
is an FSA PowerBox. So, that’s in conjunction with Power2Max. And then, my personal
favorite as ever, is in fact, the race number holder
here on the seat post. It’s from Burke Composite,
so I’ve mentioned them a few times recently on the GCN Tech Show, and this is just another
example of their fine work. (upbeat music) (electronic wooshing) – Can your bike be too good for you? It is an accusation that
flies around from time to time that you might not, in some
way, have earned your bike; irrespective of how much
disposable income you might have, and all the gear and no
idea is a serious put down. I mean, no one wants
to be called an agony. – (stammering) Dad. – Charlie!
– Dad, dad! (glass shattering)
(playful music) Yeah, had a lot of speed
through that corner, didn’t he? – Aero.
– Mhm. – But, is there any truth in it? That is the question and I
got to thinking about this following the announcement
a few weeks back that the Axeon Hagens
Berman development team over in the U.S. are
gonna be racing this year on aluminum specialized Allez framesets. Now, it’s not exactly
slum yet I’ll grant you, but the principal is a
well established one that, as you improve as a rider, so too your equipment should improve with you. I mean, it’s even programmed into Zwift. The more time you spend on there, the more bikes you can
unlock, particularly linked to the achievements that you make as well. But who does deserve an amazing bike then? A pro cyclist for one,
that would make sense, but what if you love riding your bike just as much as Peter Sagan, you just haven’t been quite as blessed in the genetics department, meaning that no matter how hard you try, you
will never be quite as fast, and believe me, I know
exactly how that feels. Strikes me that if you put a
minimum ability requirement on bike ownership, that would therefore be a little bit unfair, anyone
is deserving of a great bike. Now, we put this to you on social media and the responses to the question have been pretty passionate, and on both sides of
the debate funny enough. First comment comes from
Yong Ling and they say, my concept is to buy whatever fits my current performance level, so I’ll say I’m not worthy of riding an aero bike unless I can sustain a minimum
of 35 kilometers an hour. So, you see, going for
the Zwift approach there. Very, very self-disciplined,
pretty through you did have one or two people that were perhaps a little bit envious of other bike riders that were able to afford super nice bikes. But, Helen Wilkie makes
an interesting point here. She says, in essence, that
there’s something not quite right if you own an expensive
bike but you don’t ride it. Now, not entirely sure I
agree with the riding part. I mean for a start, poor John
would actually have to sell 10 of his 15 bikes at
least, but actually for me, evolving that slightly, it’s
being about appreciation. You see, if you don’t
appreciate your bikes then you’re not deserving of them. In fact, if you don’t love it, any bike is probably too good for you. Now, this comment here from Joedonald Oyb was really good, logical, to the point. No the bike cannot be
too good for the rider because the bike is a tool
and it allows us to ride at the skill level we’re at
and to help improve our skills. So, if it’s a 500 pound
bike or 6,000 pound bike, if it gets you out and riding
that is all that matters. What I’ve enjoyed reading the most and what’s really made
me smile is actually the majority of comments that
seem to have come from riders, who think that perhaps, yes, their bike could be too good for them, but that makes them really,
really appreciate it. If you’re lucky to have it, then love it, and that is what really matters. An example of which would
be this from Gary Skinner. I thought this when I
bought my Bianchi Oltre. A 50 year old man on
carbon, did I need it, did I think it was far
better than my riding? To be honest, yes, but I love it. It gives me loads of enjoyment, it has definitely made me
quicker, and as an old mate used to say to me, if
you want it, ‘ave it. Life’s too short not to enjoy yourself. And then Chris Fair, another one, I didn’t think I exactly manage to test the climbing potential of
this light weight bad boy, given I’m 90 keys and five foot nine, but it’s so pretty though, and
yeah, it is so pretty Chris. Really pretty, in fact. Now, another reason
that I’ve been thinking about this topic is
because of mountain biking. Now, bear with me right,
so, as technology improves, mountain bikes have basically got bigger, and bigger, and more capable. So, wheels have got bigger
so you get more traction and more control, suspension
travel has got longer, tires have got wider. So basically, the bikes have
just got an awful lot faster, which is great but you
see, my local trails are the same today as
they were 20 years ago. Fantastic fun but the hills
haven’t got any longer. The trails haven’t got
any tougher or harder, and so actually, if you ride ’em on a lot of bells and whistles, all sing and all dancing mountain bike, it kinda makes it a little bit easy and maybe a little bit boring. However, if you ride ’em on an old school cross-country Hardtail,
they are fantastic fun and the bike makes the
trails challenging, you see? And then, in the winter you ride ’em on a cross bike and it’s even harder still. So, in mountain biking you
get this weird situation where the bike might not
be too good for the rider, but it can certainly be too good for the trails that you ride it on. Fortunately though, I don’t
think we have that on the road, so a faster road bike is gonna
be faster no matter what, and that I think means it’s more fun on flat roads or hilly roads. And if you go down the gravel route, and I’ve still gotta
use that wretched name, although thank you very
much for your suggestions, do keep them coming in. I particularly liked smart
casual the other day, ’cause just like the dress code, no one knows what a
gravel black is either. Anyway, if you do go down
the gravel route then of course you’ll be able to ride on a greater variety of
roads than a road bike, so that’ll be more fun,
and a good gravel bike is more likely to be comfortable, certainly lighter I would
think, and therefore faster too. So, no, for my money a bike cannot be too good for the rider. A bike could be wasted on a rider but only if it’s not
loved or not appreciated, or not well looked after. But, if you meet those criteria, for my money you can have
whatever bike you like. Make sure though, you let us know what you think down in the comment section and also, let’s have a vote on this. Up there you can let us know your opinion. Is a bike, or can a bike
be too good for the rider? Yes or no, and it’s a
simple one, get involved. (electronic wooshing) What else have we got in the
world of tech this week then? Well, it seems like the
EF Education First Drapac presented by Cannondale team have got themselves some new team cars, notable for the fact that they’re Teslas. So, they are electric cars. Now, the team did say
on their Twitter account that this was not an official
sponsorship from Tesla, but Tesla are lending them the cars. Either way, it certainly
looks like an interesting one, because pro racing is a
pretty challenging environment for the team cars as well as the riders, and then having electric cars kinda adds another dimension in, isn’t it? So, we will be watching
this one with interest and hopefully as soon as we
catch up with the team again, we will be able to take a
close look at those cars. Right, over on the GCN show this week, we mentioned that Zwift had released a super cool little teaser video that was suggesting the
climbing was about to get supersized on Watopia with Alpe du Zwift. Well, we didn’t have to wait
long for the full release. It is out now in fact,
Alpe du Zwift is gonna be 12 kilometers long, climbs 1036 meters, meaning that the average
gradient therefore is 8 1/2 percent, and it’s
got 21 hairpins, that’s right. Now, to get to it, it will
be from the Mayan Jungle loop and it’s gonna be open to Zwifters who are level 12 or higher. Now, we are getting towards
the end of new tech this week, but we couldn’t possibly go for a week without having a new smart casual bike. That’s right, a new gravel bike. Well, now actually this Rocky
Mountain Solo was released a couple of weeks ago, but
I think it looks great. A real workhorse of a bike,
but in the best possible sense. So, an aluminum frame,
it’s got one bike groupset, the ability to swap
between 700c, 650b wheels for that all around versatility, and indeed it’s got rack mounts and mudguard slash fender mounts as well. I think it looks great,
big thumbs up from me. Now, the final bit of new tech this week. We’ve got a big shout out to
give to Michael Lowe in Canada because he sent through, some of these. Check it out, look closely. 3D printed, custom GCN bar end plugs. They are awesome, thanks Michael. A set of those is going
on one of my bikes. (electronic wooshing) It is now time to induct another product onto the GCN Wall of Fame. Last week, it was the humble Freehub. This week, we’re going all in with the iconic Spinergy Rev-X wheels. That’s right, these were true legends of the ’90s racing scene, launched all the way back in 1991 in fact. It was a carbon wheel with an aluminum rim and it had eight bladed spokes on there, and they were paired under tension to give the wheel its integrity. We will tackle the
elephant in the room first, were they any good? Well, I’ve never used
a set, more’s the pity, but apparently it’s debatable. Okay, so they certainly look mega aero, but they were supposedly a
little bit on the flexi side. Although Spinergy later
released some little cross-braces that you stuck
in between the pair of spokes that was supposed to
stiffen them up somewhat. Now, they also weighed
1,900 grams per pair, but all that aside, they were adopted by a whole load of pro bike riders
in the ’90s, and in fact, they were still in use right up to when the UCI moved to ban them in 2001. Yes, that’s right, who’d have thought the UCI would ban them? Apparently the reason being
was concerns about safety. So, there were rumors that they sometimes just detonated underneath riders, but given how many
Spinergys you can still find knocking around on eBay today, I don’t think that can be quite true. But, the main reason apparently,
was rumors of decapitation, or at least fears of decapitation anyway, because those bladed spokes are bladed. Michele Bartoli, legendary
Italian bike racer, almost lost a kneecap allegedly. Anyway, the UCI moved to ban
them and more’s the pity, but nevertheless, these
are still as cool today as they were when they
were launched 27 years ago. They may not have changed
the world of tech, but they’re flippin’ cool aren’t they? Oh yeah, so, well deserving of a place on the GCN Wall of Fame, and don’t you go talking about fashion over function at this point. If you haven’t seen the GCN show, make sure you check it out. Anyway, do let us have your suggestions for next week’s Wall of Fame inductee. Get involved in the
comment section down below. (electronic wooshing) Let us get stuck in to Bike
of the Week now, shall we? Each week we give you two
bikes and you have to choose which one you like the
most, and then vote. We have the results of the
last week first of all, where we asked you to pick either a BMC Teammachine SLR01 or a specialized S-Works Tarmac SL6 Disc. Both bikes very, very catchily
named I think you’ll agree. Anyway, the voting this week for once wasn’t particularly close,
we had a stand out winner. In second place with 36
percent of the votes, it was the BMC, meaning therefore, that the specialized
was the runaway winner with 63 percent of the vote. So, maybe the fact that
it was brand spanking new caught your attention, maybe it’s because you’re Peter Sagan fans and
not Greg Van Avermaet fans but it’s gonna be interesting
to see if either of those wins at this weekend’s Tour of Flanders. Alright, we’re gonna take a little break from our pro race bikes in
Bike of the Week this week. We’re gonna go with smart
casual, it’s gravel bike week. The revised, brand new
3T Exploro Flatmount with one bike groupset
and 650b wheels versus the Canyon Grail, two by 700c
wheels, and that handlebar. Although the 3T’s got a pretty
funky handlebar as well, it’s their new SuperGhiaia
gravel specific one, very nice it is too. So, there we go, those are your two bikes. Beautiful, both of them, but
which one is your favorite? Make sure you vote up there. I’ll be very intrigued to
see the results of this one. (electronic wooshing) Okay, we are getting towards
the end of the show now, but before we go, I got
some results for you. We have had some mega unboxings
up on the channel of late and I’ve got the lucky job of
announcing the seven winners from the seller San Marco
unboxing from the other week. So, are you ready? Listen out for your name, listen closely ’cause I’ll mispronounce
it, apologies for that. First up, the Supercomfort
Aspide Racing Saddle, we’ve got two of those, won by Carl Evans and Dennis Klippel Slokar, so
congratulations to you both. Then, we’ve got two Aspide
Supercomfort Racing Wide Saddles won by Vedran Vrhovac and Anti Altkula, so congratulations to you both as well. And then, we still got
three winners to go. Are you nervous? Yeah, I figured you might be. We’ve got three Selle San
Marco Short Fit Racing Saddles won by Marco Miguel, Jon Fraser,
and Maximillian Sesserath. So, congratulations to all seven of you. If your name wasn’t one
of those then don’t worry because you can still
get involved and enter the Met Trenta 3K Carbon
Helmet unboxing competition. So, that one, well get
involved quickly actually, we’ll put the link to it in the description beneath this video. (electronic wooshing) Okay, you ready for Bike Vault? John had the horn last
week but he’s left it here. (horn whistling) Oh, God, it never gets any better does it? Right then, without further ado let’s go straight up for the first one. It’s from Muys Hasani
from Brunei Darussalam. It looks like a specialized Allez, that is a beautiful looking bike isn’t it? We gotta say is that Dura Ace groupset, nice set of Roval wheels on it, and pretty good backdrop, pedals level. I tell you what, I’m
struggling to think of a reason why that is not a super nice bike. (stamping)
(alarm whistling) Oh God, right, anyway, there we go. Congratulations Muys, straight
up, one bike, one super nice. Okay, next we got this, David King. He sent in a picture, excuse me, of his Colnago Master from the 1980s, taken in West Blackdene, County Durham in the north of England. That’s a cool bike, I’m a
sucker for a vintage Colgano. I’m not sure if the
composition of the picture is quite right there David. I mean, we’ve got the basics right? We’ve got the chain in the
big ring and in the 11. I dunno, I feel like we’re not getting quite enough view of the
bike, nor the backdrop. So, I’m gonna say it’s
a nice, and I’m sorry because every fiber of
my being screams that that is a super nice
bike, but there we go. We’ve gotta have our rules
so I’m going with it. Okay, next up we got this, Andy Sin with his dog Tucker from the Netherlands. I love that photo, that
is amazing, thanks Andy. And you get a super nice
just ’cause of your dog. Although, in the background we can see that his Argon 18 is
pretty darn nice as well. SRAM eTap groupset by the look of it. I know it’s out of focus but you know, we wanna see the dog don’t we really? Anyway, that is super cool,
I like that very much. Right, next up we’ve got this Time Izon with Campagnolo Super Record
and lightweight wheels. That is a serious bit of kit isn’t it? Look at that, Campagnolo groupset. Those lightweight wheels always look the business, don’t they? Position’s beautiful,
change in the right gear, crank’s level. The only thing I’m gonna say here is that the backdrop is perhaps
not quite as inspiring as some that we have been used to. Although, I do appreciate the fact that it is a clean backdrop so we get to pervert
your bike, quite frankly. But, for that reason, I think I’m just gonna have to give it nice. I know, I know, but those are the rules. Don’t ask me, have a go at Martin Ashton in the comments at GMB if
you really don’t like it. No, don’t do that, that
would be a bit mean. It’s a cool game. Right then, we’ve got
this from Ken Tongmet taken in Tokyo, Japan during
the Sakura blossom, March 2018. That is cool, I didn’t know that I liked Sakura blossom, but I do. I also am always a
sucker for a Trek Madone. Looks like you’ve almost
got Lasty’s paint job there, that makes it super nice for a start. That is one seriously,
seriously cool bike. Dura-Ace Di2 groupset on there, we got Bontrager Aeolus 5 wheels,
and I do like the blossom. Also, you’ve taken the time to go get your stand for your bike, bring it outside, and compose the picture. Do you know what? (alarm whistles) It’s a super nice. Right then, this last one, this is the perfect Bike
Vault photo so far, okay? This is textbook, this
is from Jason Waterhouse. He says he lives in
Arrowtown, New Zealand, and the photo is taken at Coronet Peak. Look at that photo, that
is an absolute banger. We’ve got a beautiful bike
and a beautiful backdrop. I can’t fault it, that
is absolutely wicked. So, we got a Cannondale Supersix. We’ve got Rotor crankset on there. Skinwall tires always look cool. The position on the bike is perfect. The position of the
brake levers is perfect. Angle of the saddle is perfect. Yeah, that is (alarm
whistles) the super nicest super nice photo I’ve seen
yet on the Bike Vault. If you think you can beat it, then do make sure you submit your photos. There’s an email address
just on the screen now and just get involved. We absolutely love going
through all of your pictures. If you sent one and it
hasn’t been on the show yet, then just send it in again and we will inevitably get around to
picking it one day, good luck. Right, that is unfortunately
it for the Tech show this week. Do make sure you get involved in the comment section down below. Let us know whether you think a bike can be too good for you, and of course, don’t forget we need your nominations for the GCN Tech Wall of Fame as well. Now, if you wanna watch another video, I’ve got one over on
the GCN channel actually that you might fancy having a look at. It’s pretty techy, it’s pretty hardcore, but it tries to answer the question, whether or not you can test positive through contaminated supplements, and it is an interesting one I think. Make sure you check it out.