Blake’s Canyon Sender DH Bike Set Up For Whistler Bikepark

Blake’s Canyon Sender DH Bike Set Up For Whistler Bikepark


(upbeat electronic music) – Ha ha! Man, we are super high up
here on the Whistler Mountain. We’re in the clouds and
I’m gonna give a lowdown on how I set up my downhill bike, specifically for the bike park. So let’s head out of the clouds. For me, I’ve picked a downhill bike. It’s the obvious choice
for me, the downhill bike, because I love going to
hit those huge jumps. I kind of like landing
flat and all of that and this bike is specifically
designed for all of that, specifically designed for going downhill, but there’s a few things
that I like to change around, especially on the
suspension part of things. I’m gonna start off with
the front of the bike. Straight out of the box, this bike comes with a
63 degree head angle, which is kind of perfect for me. I haven’t touched that, but you can get cups in here that can change it by
plus or minus one degree, but I don’t want a super
raked out front end. I like to have the bike super compact, ’cause I like to flick the bike around and I’m not too worried about that. When it comes to suspension setting and rear suspension setting,
I’m a bit meticulous with this. I’m gonna start with the front. I’m running 95 psi, one Token in there. It’s quite stiff. It’s quite hard, but it’s perfect for me. I don’t want those forks
to dive on a takeoff. Clicks, what I mean by clicks is you’ve got a rebound
setting down the bottom, you got high-speed and
low-speed compression setting up the top, so what I do
I close them right off and on the rebound, I’m
running eight clicks open, which is enough rebound for me. It’s not too fast and it’s not too slow. It’s just perfect and right for me. On the top on the high-speed, basically that’s for
those big hits out there, I’m running that at 18 clicks. So that’s quite a lot, but I think that’s good
enough for my huge hits. And 14 clicks on my low-speed then, to soak up all those tiny little guys. So coming from a dirt jump background, I don’t really venture off
into the full suspension realm. I only have front suspension
and the rear is a rigid frame, so it’s a hard tail. So what I’ve done with this rear shock, I’ve volume spacered it to its max. I’ve got 165 psi in there. It doesn’t sound much, but
what that volume spacer does, it decreases the chamber
that the air is in, so it kind of makes it bit more stiffer. Alright, moving on to the fine details, all the settings, all
the clicking settings on this rear shock. Much like the front one I’ve
done, I’ve shut them all off and my high-speed compression right here, what I’ve done is I’ve
opened it 14 clicks, which enough for all those big hits. For all those tiny little bumps, what I’ve done with the low-speed is I’ve opened it 15 clicks, which is perfect for all
those little bumps for myself. So when it comes down
to high-speed rebound, what I’ve done is I’ve
opened it 18 clicks, which sounds a lot, but I want that rear
shock to react quickly when I’m hitting those jumps. Then on low-speed rebound,
I’ve done it at 14 clicks, which is kind of perfect for me. Alright, moving on to the
drivetrain on my bike. This is a little bit special for me, ’cause on the back there’s
something different, but I’m gonna talk about the front. I like to run a nice chain device, a bit of an aggressive one,
with a nice bash ring right here just to protect my chain ring and chain when it does come in contact with rocks and bit more protection is this. What Canyon have done is they’ve
added this nice plasticy, rubber down tube protector
just to protect it from rocks flicking up
out there in the bike park and destroying your down tube. Pedal wise, I’m running flat pedals. I don’t tend to clip in on this, because I like to get my
feet off and do some tricks, ’cause I’m that kind of guy, but what I’ve done is wound the pins out to give me extra grip there
when I do come to a situation where the trail gets a bit
rough and I want my feet to stay on the pedals and not bounce off. My seat height setting. I tend to run it quite low down, but you can’t really
slam this saddle down, because you gotta take into
account that this rear triangle and this tyre is gonna come up when that suspension is fully compressed and this is gonna buzz here. So what I’ve done, I let all
the air out of my rear shock, slammed it down to its max compression and make sure there’s just enough gap to clear the rear wheel and my saddle. These Renthal Fatbars straight
out the box are 800 mil wide, but I am not a long armed human being, where is Dadi has got super long arms. He can stick to 800 mil, bit
more keep him in control, but I’ve kind of cut them down to 760. Bit like what I ride on my dirt jump bike and that brings it all in and I can flick it all about a
little more better out there. My tyre choice to ride a bike park, I love these tyres, a
super aggressive tyre. This is a Continental Der Kaiser. It’s a 2.4 inch width of tyre. It’s super aggressive. It’s got a lot of grip. The side walls are super thick, just keep those punctures
at bay if I hit a rock. For me, I’m running tubes front and rear. I just like to ride tubes. So there you go, there are a few tips on how I set up my downhill
bike for a bike park, such like Whistler bike park. If you wanna see more
videos just like this one, don’t forget to click
that rad little globe and you won’t miss another
video and you subscribe. If you wanna see another
video just like this one, click on the right there and you’ll get “Bike
Park Jargon Explained” and on the left for “How
To Ride North Shore”. Don’t forget to give it a thumbs up like.