Bicycle Pedal Removal and Installation

Bicycle Pedal Removal and Installation


Hello. We’re going to walk through the
process of pedal removal and installation. The pedal is one of the most important
contact points of the bicycle and it’s critical the pedals are
properly secured in the crank. Join us as we go through each step of the process. First, let’s discuss why we might want to do this: We might want to remove our pedals
and install new ones. We might remove our pedals if we’re packing it in a box. If it’s a new bike assembly, we
are simply installing the pedals. The basic tools and supplies needed are a
pedal wrench, thread lubrication and a rag to wipe up. For the common pedal with a 15mm wrench flat,
there are four Park Tool products. For pedals with no wrench flat outside the crank, there will be a hex fitting put directly into the spindle. These may be either an 8mm or a 6mm. The left and right pedal threads are different directions. That can be confusing at times, trying to
remember which way to turn. The right pedal is going to loosen counterclockwise.
The left pedal is going to loosen clockwise. But before we do any work,
let’s cover up that large chainring. Those sharp teeth can do a lot of damage,
so here we have at least a little protection. When you place your wrench on, make sure it’s fully engaged but also think of your mechanical advantage. This is probably the worst position I could have picked – very poor mechanical advantage. We have two levers here – the pedal wrench and the crank arm. Try the different positions and get those two levers close to one another. That is good. For me, that’s ideal.
So here, I wanna go counter-clockwise. I’m going to push down with the crank arm and pull up at the same time with the pedal wrench – freeing that pedal. Another way to remember this
is as if you are pedaling forward – holding the wrench steady, the wrench is to the back – we are going forward with the pedal it’s
coming off, and there we are. The same process works on the left. Again, try the different wrench fittings. See what is the best mechanical advantage. Here I have the crank arm, here I have the pedal in this case we’re going to turn the wrench
clockwise as seen from the left side and it is as if we are pedaling forward.
That’s the direction that it comes off. For pedals that use the hex fitting behind the axle, the thread direction is still the same and the concept is the same. Rotate the bike as you need to get at it.
In this case we install the wrench and pedaling forward is still the
direction for removal. Once you break it free, come with the short side of the Allen
and unthread it and the pedal is out. Thread preparation is an important part of pedal installation. Use either anti-seize compound or grease,
anti-seize compound being more durable. Preparing the threads this way helps them pull up properly tight in the crank threads. When installing your new pedals, note that there will be an “L” and an “R” marked on the pedals. Take a pedal, install it into the arm,
the right side turning clockwise Turn it in with your fingers one or two turns. That makes sure you haven’t mangled or cross-threaded the crank. Install the pedal wrench – now we’re going
backwards – and it will stop into the crank. Now think about placing your hands and your wrench for good mechanical advantage. Here, if I switch, I get much better mechanical advantage. I’m going to push clockwise down with the wrench and pull up on the crank to tighten that. A tight crank pedal is a very important thing for your safety. a common torque is 300 inch pounds.
That’s about 34 Newton meters. If you’re using a hand wrench, holding it about 10 inches from the thread, that is about a 30 pound push on the wrench to get that kind of load. Another option is the crow foot on a torque wrench. we will get the resonance, the click, telling us that we’re properly tight. The process is the same on the left side: threading it counterclockwise one or two
turns by finger, reposition your wrench as necessary, 30 pounds of effort on a 10 inch wrench. For the pedals that have only the hex fitting, take the short end of the hex and insert it through the crank. Engage your pedal, bring it up and now we are using this
to spin it in clockwise. Bring it up to the crank and now
find the best possible position. You may not actually have many choices. I can’t tighten into the chainring. I have to back up. This is good as it can get. So here, same concept, tighten the pedal fully. If the pedals are extremely tight, it can actually help to put the bike on the ground. We can grab the left crank arm, I install the wrench, and the best mechanical position possible. I can now use my body weight to push down and pull up on the left crank arm, pushing down on the right to loosen that pedal. With a carbon fiber arm, it’s good to use a pedal washer. It helps keep the pedal spindle tightening into the carbon. Never use a hub cone wrench when installing a pedal. These are thin and are designed for the hub cones, a much lower torque than when installing our pedals.