Best TRIATHLON BIKE SETUP upgrades for triathletes on a budget

Best TRIATHLON BIKE SETUP upgrades for triathletes on a budget


– Morning, Trainiacs. She is gonna be a sizable workout today. One of the coolest things
about the Ventum here is that this 1.4 liter water bottle actually makes the bike more aerodynamic. So what we’ve got going here today is a two and a half to three hour ride, followed by a 20 minute run, and there’s a very specific way that
we’re gonna do this. You know, new toys are fun and all, but it really adds a lot of
complexity to every single ride. All of a sudden, I gotta be a mechanic before I even clip in, but once I do, I’mma be fast and I’mma look good. (heavy electronic music) I gotta try it eventually,
right? Why not today? (heavy electronic music) – Ooh, Trainiacs, that was a good session to end this two weeks of work on. 87K, talking just about 56 miles, in 2:50, keeping my heart rate under 135. I wanted to stay nice and aerobic there, and what I was doing was 10 minutes with really low cadence, around 60, 3 minutes at high cadence, over 100, and then 5 minutes rest. Just kept repeating that as
long as I was out of the city. And then, just went for a 20 minute run, and the focus was, let’s
not worry about pace, I wanted to worry about running with good form after the bike, and just smooth, form-based running, I was at 4:32 per kilometer. Like, that’s race pace.
And it felt really good. 7 minute miles, 4.4 kilometers… 2.7 miles in 20 minutes.
Something like that. All right, so hungry that I could eat the drywall off the studs. I’m gonna just stop one
step short of that, and then we’re gonna talk about best
upgrades to make to your bike. That took more out of me than expected. I needed a giant bowl
of oatmeal and a nap. Hence, you get me in my pjs. All right, let’s talk about upgrades that you can make to your bike, starting from the least expensive
up to the most expensive. We’re gonna be going bang for
your buck here at the start, and then at the end a
little bit more luxury. And just so you know, this is extremely unscientific, top of my head numbers. Feel free to correct me in the comments. First thing that’s
probably one of the best and most under-utilized
upgrades is your tires. One, rolling resistance on the ground can mean as much as 14 watts. Now it’s not like 14 watts on somebody who’s trying to ride 200 watts on average is gonna get 7% faster, but 14 watts of resistance savings is huge. In addition to that, weight saved in your tires is four
times more effective. It’s rolling weight. Because the wheel is
rolling around, if you save, let’s just say for easy
math, a pound on the rim, it’s like four pounds lighter in action. What I would recommend is
go to your local bike shop and say that you’re looking for a tire that isn’t quite the
maximum race-specific tire, but one or maybe two steps down. Something like the Continental 4000 S IIs. These are the Specialized Turbo Pros. Something like that that’s still gonna be good enough to ride outside
and not be so susceptible to punctures and flats,
but it’s nice and snappy. Only cost you maybe 100 to 150 bucks. Next thing, integrated hydration, either on the back of your seat or in between the handlebars
going horizontally. These areas for water
bottles is essentially invisible to the wind, so it’s going to make your bike a heck of
a lot more aerodynamic keeping your bottles back
there or in the front than it is on the down
tube creating turbulence. That might cost you,
depending on the system that you go with, again, $100 to $200. I also wouldn’t get that
really big water bottle that drops down in between
the aero bars at the front, because that actually acts as a wind sail, and all of a sudden your
wheels are gonna be like this, and that actually creates turbulence throughout the entire bike that is gonna slow you down, not ideal. Next thing, you wanna make
sure that your saddle, I like the Cobb saddles,
and your front cockpit is adjusted in such a way that you can sit in the aero bars for
a long period of time. This probably comes in line
with getting a bike fit. Bike fit might cost you anywhere between about $200 and $400. Saddle might be about $200 to $300. Cockpit can go all the way up to $1,000. But the main thing to know is that whatever you’re going
with, and it can be just stock off your bike, you wanna make sure that you are able to
comfortably sit in the saddle in the aero position for a long time. When you get up out of the aero position, you turn into a wind
sail, and 85% of the drag of your entire setup here is
from your body, not the bike. Let’s say bike fit is
the biggest thing there. Next thing, this is a little bit pricier, but it’s probably the
very first big upgrade that you want to make,
and that is a helmet. A really good aero helmet like this can probably add about 1
to 1.5 kilometers per hour, we’re talking almost a mile per hour, just by putting on this helmet. Now granted, helmets start
getting really expensive, so you’ve got a couple of options. You can get an aero road
helmet that you can use both during your road
riding and your tri-riding. Or, you can take an average
road helmet that has this feature and add to it an aero shell. Aero shell only costs
about 30 or 40 bucks, and it has almost the
same aerodynamic advantage as this, so you’re only
having to buy one helmet. Total cost: anywhere from
$150 all the way up to $400, depending on how fancy you wanna get. Wheels. Hell yes! Lots of benefit to wheels. You get that same 1 to 1.5
kilometers per hour benefit. With a disc wheel,
probably a little bit more, plus you sound really cool going “Whoosh, whoosh, whoosh,” down the road. However, when you start
getting into wheels, these are $3,000, $4,000 wheel sets, so the dollar per speed
advantage starts going down. If you’re looking for a really
good bang for your buck, there are wheel sets
out there that are used that you can get anywhere between about $500, and $700, $800, or you can get one of the cheaper wheel
sets for about 1,000. I like me the Altos, though.
They’re nice and stiff. Really good power transfer, excellent. Some sort of a power
meter, this is an excellent bang for your buck, especially right now. I use the P1 Power Pedals, and they are currently selling for, I believe, $700. They were originally 1,500. So you gotta go to the
PowerTap website directly and they’ve got ’em
there, and occasionally they’ve been putting up
refurbished sets for, I think, 599. Very good thing. And if you start getting
serious about triathlon, and you want to start
dialing in your training, power really helps. Does it give you an
instant speed advantage? No. But does it give you a
good training advantage? Hells yeah. And as far as group sets go, this is the Shimano Dura-Ace Di2. This is the highest level of
group sets that Shimano makes. Now this costs many, many
thousands of dollars, and the reason for that is that
it is absolutely precision, like, tink, tink, tink, tink, tink. It instantly hits the gear
shifting and it’s really light. Do I recommend it for beginners? People that are trying to save
money and still get faster? No. The bike that I used before
this had Shimano 105. Four levels of shifting down. Was the performance the same as this? No, it wasn’t nearly as crisp. Was the bike unrideable? No, not at all. This is just a really nice luxury. So when you start
getting into luxury bikes like I’ve got here,
like this is so overkill and unnecessary, but that doesn’t
mean that I don’t love it. We want the best of the best. That doesn’t mean that
it’s what you have to have. So there you go, Trainiacs. I know that I’ve covered those tidbits scattered throughout many other videos, so if you are subscribed,
thank you for sticking around until this point, and like the video. If you aren’t yet subscribed
and you like all these tips, hit the subscribe button below. If you like longer interview podcasts, check out the Triathlon Taren Podcast. It is the most reviewed
triathlon podcast in the world. Later, Trainiacs. I gotta wash me some
integrated Ventum bottles now.