6 Climbing Mistakes To Avoid When Cycling | GCN Pro Tips

6 Climbing Mistakes To Avoid When Cycling | GCN Pro Tips


– Riding uphill is hard enough as it is, so don’t make it any more
difficult than it needs to be. (upbeat music) No matter how long or
short a climb may be, the most efficient and comfortable way of getting to the top is to pace yourself. So avoid, at all costs, going flat out at the beginning, and
ending up in oxygen debt, and then running the rest
of the way up the climb in a rather sorry state. So don’t blow, and end up slow. Spin to win is all well and good, but don’t go too low. Now Chris Froome somehow
gets away with it, with his amazing washing machine style, but for us mere mortals,
spinning at such a high cadence not only looks silly, but
it’s simply not efficient. Go too low, you’ll only end up slow. At the other end of the cadence
spectrum is over-gearing. In many ways, it’s even
worse than under-gearing. Why? Well, firstly, you may actually do some
damage to your knees due to the torque and the load that you’re putting through them. And secondly, quite simply, you’ll be very mechanically inefficient. And also, you may
actually become in danger of grinding to a halt, and actually toppling off your bike. Feel the burn, but let those pedals turn. Know when to shift gear at the right time. So, not on the steepest part of the climb, when you are hardly moving at all. The torque through the
mech will only result in your gears grinding and crunching, and often result in the
chain getting jammed. Ideally, sit down and shift in advance of any severe gradient change. Also, try and avoid
shifting from the big ring into the small ring, when you’re putting a lot of torque through the bike, as this can often result
in a dropped chain. Although on that occasion,
I got away with it. So shift smooth, don’t lose your groove. Really, I hear you ask. Well yes, really, because I’ve seen it for myself first hand. Incredibly, some people do actually try to climb out of the saddle whilst holding onto the tops of the bars. Just don’t do it. You’re in hardly any
control of the bike at all, and you might end up
taking somebody else out, as well as looking like a
complete and utter plonker. And that’s English for idiot, in whatever your respective territory is. Don’t climb on the tops, it’s
better on the drops, or hoods. Avoid, at all costs,
stuffing food, i.e. a cake or an energy bar, into your mouth when you’re riding hard on a climb, especially a steep one. Doing this will leave you trying in inhale through a filter of soggy, mashed-up food, likely causing you to inhale, or vomit, or choke on what you’re
supposed to be eating. Don’t do it, it looks horrible as well. Give yourself time to chew,
that way you won’t hurl or spew. Now, I’m sure you’ll
agree that avoiding those climbing mistakes will
make for a far better climbing experience. And we’d also like to hear
about your climbing errors. Leave them down in the
comments section below. And if you haven’t
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miss another GCN video. Now for our top ten cycling mistakes, click just up here. And for our top ten cycling
excuses for climbing, click just up here. And don’t forget to like
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