5 E-Bike Set Up Mistakes And How To Avoid Them

5 E-Bike Set Up Mistakes And How To Avoid Them


– Very often in the rush to
get outside riding our e-bikes we might forget a few basic set up points. But they’re not so much
mistakes, as oversights, in the excitement to get outside.
So let’s take a look at a few of them. So guys a lot of tips I’m
gonna talk about today are actually e-bike specific
because what can sometimes happen, you can actually lend
your e-bike out to a friend who’s never ridden an e-bike
before and expect the set up to be exactly the same as a
conventional bike, but that is simply not the case. (electronic upbeat music) Now the first one is handlebar position. On no end of occasions, I’ve
come back and a friend’s borrowed my e-bike and I
tipped the handlebar forwards. And the reason for that
is because when you ride a conventional bike, you’re
stood on the paddles and when you’re going up those banks,
you’re actually lean in over the front of the bike. Now
on an e-bike that’s simply not the case, when you’re doing
climbs more often than not you’re sat on the seat, and the
handlebar needs to be in the optimal position. So having
it forwards, is actually gonna push you forwards, which
means less traction on that back tyre. Now when I say the
handlebar is too far forwards, what I mean is it’s actually
forwards of the vertical position. So when you get side
on to your bike, the central part of the handlebar should be vertical. Obviously there’s gonna be
back sweep on the handlebar but that central piece needs to
be in the vertical position. On the other end of the spectrum,
you can actually have your handlebar too far backwards,
which means it’s leaning backwards from vertical, and
what then is that when you do a new climbing on your e-bike
you’re too far back of the bike which means that front wheel
is gonna be caught in the air far too often. (electronic upbeat music) Right number two is lever position. Now as you can see I’m on
this flat single track and I’m riding, I got my hands on the brakes. And it’s actually quite a
natural position to have the levers pointing down like that.
However, what happens when you’re going up or down the hill. Now if you’ve got those levers
in that downward position and you’re tackling a short sharp bank those downward levers are
actually pretty comfortable However keep those levers in
that same downward position and when you start going
downhill then you’re gotta increasingly curve your wrists
over the front of the bike to get hold of those levers. So the sweet spot of your
levers, where you put them. Well we’re all different ways,
but I tend to find it they tend to work best when
they’re slightly down from the horizontal position which
makes it a very natural feeling when you’re stood up paddling
down through single track when you’re descending or
when you’re climbing sat down. So there you go, slightly
down from horizontal. Now one other thing, I should
mention about levers before we go off the subject
is don’t over tight them because if you come off, if
the lever’s got a little bit of movement in them, it simply
moves on the handlebar rather than bends the lever. (electronic upbeat music) Now we’re gonna move on now to
stem, first thing with stems is again don’t over tight that as well. When you rotate your handlebars,
it should be good free movement there on the front
wheel on front wheel on the front four because if you over
tighten the stem it’s gonna grind, wear out your headset and make your steering absolutely horrendous. Now the second thing on your
stem is make sure you get your stem in the right position. You can adjust the height of
the stem by way of the spacage which come either under
it or on top of it. What I suggest is you should
experiment with your stem position is because there’s a
sweet spot there for everybody I want to touch on something
really quickly, and that’s the length of your stem under
which the handle bars. Now obviously a lot of you
resort to the bike shop or just bike online. Now what it comes down to is
that the size of your bike is something that is fixed,
however the fit of your bike is something that you can alter. Now it comes down to very
simple things, you know, maybe you feel a little bit
stretched out on your bike You know maybe you got a
70mm or 80mm stem on there bring it back, put 40 or
50 on there, the same time I see a load of people riding
with these handlebars out here you know maybe go from
800mm down to a 760mm bar. These things are fixed, you
can find the sweet spot of your bike just by altering a
few component parts in it. (electronic upbeat music) Now this is a classic
you might well have lent your e-bike to your mate, who
happens to be a down hiller He brings the bike back and the
seat is pointing in the air. Yeah, it’s a cool thing to
do, it’s what down hillers do it’s their most comfortable position. On an e-bike it’s a no no
because that’s simply gonna be forcing your weight over the
back of your bike and that front wheel is gonna
be pouring in the air. The same time you might
well have lent your bike to a super tall rider and
bike’s come back and the seat is all the way back in the rails,
again this is something you want to avoid and need by. You
want a good central balanced position, not one that’s just
biased forwards or rearwards. Seat type really is something
that affects the way you ride Now a lot of downhillers
obviously like to have their seat low down which means you can
maneuver that bike underneath you quite easily. And the same
applies on an e-bike too and even more so because when you
got a seat that is low down you can actually move your body
forwards and backwards a lot easier, than when your seat
is right up in the air. Because you actually quite
affects position when your seat’s up there, obviously it depends
if you got a dropper post or not but make sure that your
seat is actually quite a long way down in the slider there
and not upwards which means you haven’t got that range of movement on your body on your rear bike. (electronic upbeat music) Now finally tyres, I want to
talk about tyres specifically because there’s another video
which you can find on that subject. But things such as
tyre pressure, now obviously this depends on the individual,
I’m about 90 kilos and I tend to run about 25ps to 35ps
in my tyres if they’re tubes. If they’re tubeless I tend to
go up two or three PSI more. But something else which is
really important on your tyre is make sure that they’re
seated correctly on the rim because a lot of the time when
you re-fit a tyre, after you got a punch job maybe you fit
in a new tyre, then make sure that bead is correctly seated
on the rim there, otherwise the tyre is gonna be wobbling
around which is gonna affect your grip levels and
stability on your bike. So there you go, that’s some
basic set up mistakes on your e-bike and how to avoid them.
If you want to see a video on more advanced cockpit and
fit techniques with your e-bike check the videos down there.
If you’re looking more tyres there’s a in depth tyre
video I can go on and on and on about tyres just down here. Last note, if you got more set
up mistakes, I’m sure there’s hundreds out there. Leave
your comments below, give a thumbs up if you like
this video and click on the globe to subscribe to EMBN
so we can bring you even more e-bike videos.