5 Cycling Skills You Can Learn Anywhere | GCN’s Pro Cycling Tips

5 Cycling Skills You Can Learn Anywhere | GCN’s Pro Cycling Tips


– Do you constantly find yourself at the carpark waiting
for your mates to turn up? Do you ever wonder what to
do with all that spare time? Well, here are some
completely nonessential but equally fun skills for you to practice whilst waiting for your mates. Riding backwards. This is a good test of
balance and coordination. Start by pushing yourself
off of the front brake to build up speed. Aim to stay central
over the top of the bike whilst rotating your legs
backwards to maintain momentum. You could always do this on
a slight downhill gradient. The bunny hop. A more crucial skill than the others here. Critical to safety on the open roads, avoiding potholes or drop
bottles in a sportive or race. The key to this skill
is your weight transfer. Don’t simply pull up on the pedals. Instead, shift your body weight up and backwards through the entire bike, lifting first your front wheel, and then your rear wheel by
scooping up into the pedals. It’s possible to do this
even without clip pedals, but you will need to perfect
your technique first. The wheelie. A real crowd pleaser. The wheelie is all about balance and the control of your
weight over the bike. Don’t lift the front wheel
by pushing on your pedals, you lift the front wheel by
pulling up and back on the bars and catching your balance
on the back brake, preventing you from overbalancing
and falling off the bike. Then from here, maintain your
balance through your hips and you core, always
covering the rear brake. This is a skill that is
rewarded by practice. The track stand. Not overly important but it
can be a useful skill to learn. Finding an uphill gradient, maintaining tension through
the chain whilst gently rocking back and forth will
help with your balance. Straight arms and straight
legs will give you more control for the fine adjustments
that this skill requires. Picking something off the floor. This is great for picking up your keys if you just dropped them, or just showing how flexible you are. The key to this skill is
maintaining a straight line and not weaving around. Start by incrementally
reaching for the ground, progressing as far as you can each time. You will need to slightly
lean the bike away from you, which will in turn bring
you closer to the ground. Go out and give it a go. Practice makes perfect. There you go, some
nonessential skills, however, I do believe by practicing
these low-speed maneuvers, you will be able to improve
your high-speed confidence on the bike. And with that in mind, why not check out our
descending video down here.