4 Bike Shops That Could Survive The Apocalypse | The GCN Show Ep. 319

4 Bike Shops That Could Survive The Apocalypse | The GCN Show Ep. 319


– From deep in the heart,
welcome to the GCN Show. – Welcome to the GCN Show,
brought to you by Wiggle. – This week the will he or won’t he saga of Geraint Thomas racing
the Giro continues, as does our own saga of push-ups, and John Degenkolb also steps
in to save Paris-Roubaix. – Plus, at a time when bike
shops are fighting hard to survive, we’re going to pick a handful of the many that we think will survive the High Street retail apocalypse. (upbeat electronic music) (air rushing) (heavy metal pounding) This week in the world of cycling, we learned that Blake of
GMBN has been trying his hand at a bit of racing on the road. (mellow electronic music) Although, not road racing
as you and I know it. – No, I think this is
called street racing, Dan. Although, strictly speaking,
it’s street, alley, steps, steel roof top,
maybe a back garden or two. – Through Grandma’s front garden. – Well, the official
name for the event, Si, is the Red Bull Valpreda Urban Downhill. Full videos, in fact, already out on GMBN, and I highly recommend
you go over and watch it. – [Simon] Yeah, you’ll find out, in fact, whether or not Blake was any better racing on the road than we were. – I got last, yes, 25th! I survived though! – Well, yeah, pretty
much that’s how we felt about road racing. – Tends to ring a bell, doesn’t it? – Yeah, Dan, how’d you
get on the Tour de France? – I survived it. Survived it with a slightly less fit is how I would describe it. – Yeah, right, and we
also learned this week that men and women, professional cyclists, can and perhaps should
race in this same race at the same time. – Yes, this is the Melbourne
to Warrnambool Classic over in Australia. 262-kilometer marathon
where the men and the women start at exactly the same time. – [Simon] Yeah, hats off to the winners, Nick White who won from the breakaway, and Peta Mullens who sprinted to victory in the main peloton. – Now last week on the show we talked about Performance Bicycle, America’s largest chain
of retail bicycle stores, and the fact that, unfortunately, they’re going to be
closing all 104 of them at the beginning of March. A really sad end to a business who started all the way back in 1981
or thereof, ironically, it started out as, wait for
it, as a mail order company. – (chuckles) That is
quite ironic, isn’t it? Now Performance Bicycle is
part of a larger parent company that filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Now we don’t know whether
or not they are victims of shortcomings in the larger corporation, but in isolation, they
certainly wouldn’t be the only retail outlet that was struggling
in the current climate. – Note there’s an example here
in the UK, too, isn’t there? Of Evans Cycles who’ve been
around for over a hundred years, and last year there was an
emergency buy-out of Evan Cycles, but unfortunately that
still means it looks like at least half of their retail stores, which they’ve got 62, could
be shutting their doors. And that is just two examples
within the bicycle institute. Of course there are plenty
who are outside of it. I mean, I’m still devastated
that Toys “R” Us went tits up not long ago.
– Now, anyway. Now, is it all doom and gloom, though? No, absolutely not. For a start, there is Columbus
Phoenix Cyclery in Ohio which is literally rising from the ashes of a former Performance Bicycle store. It opened by a few of its
former employees which is cool. – It was very cool, I was
very pleased to read that. And now we asked you on social media for your favorite bike shops, and, my goodness, you did not disappoint. We literally had hundreds and hundreds of suggestions from your
favorite bike shops, that’s either do plenty for
the local cycling community, or deliver a great service, or invariably delivery
some amazing coffee. In some cases, all three at once. Is it possible to run
a successful bike shop in the currently quite
difficult retail climate? Well, we certainly hope so, and coming up are a few
examples of bike shops that we think should not
only survive, but thrive. – That’s right, we’re
gonna get things started with one I’ve actually been
to and thought was great. It’s called The Cub House. It’s based in San Marino in
California just outside of L.A. Now the reason we went there
initially is because the owner, Sean Talkington, has an immaculate
vintage Team Z race bike and very kindly lent it out to us. But, oh, super glad that we went. Apparently, when they set
out with The Cub House, the intention was not
to create a bike shop but they said that the
overwhelming support from the L.A. bike community meant that it was something of a no-brainer. And so, although their web store with Dream Cycling as
their bread and butter, they said that The Cub House
more than pulls its weight. – But basically then
people asked to buy bikes from them and they now
sell those bikes to them. – Well, it does seem that way, yeah, which is a nice way of
doing business, isn’t it? Anyway, worth taking a look. Great riding on their doorstep as well. – Yes, and next suggestion came in from Markus Schachtschabel,
and he has made the suggestion of the Musette shop
over in Malmo in Sweden. Reason being that Musette
is not just a bike shop, but it’s also a social hub
so they organize regular weekly rides on site across mountain bikes and on the road too. But they also promote local races, gravel, cyclocross, and mountain bike. – So building up a strong
community, serving great coffee. Seems like there’s a theme here, Dan. – It does, doesn’t it? And then what about Corsa Corsa (Simon groaning)
over in Japan? I mean, Cannings was so
excited when he even found out he was going, let alone
when he made the video. – That is a real
interesting one, that one, because the owner has
established this ultimate niche of really great quality,
rare, vintage bikes. And so, although he’s a
brick-and-mortar store, his reputation is absolutely global. So, in one case, it’s
kind of an extreme example of a local bike shop, but on the other, I guess there’s similarities
’cause like many owners of shops, he’s driven by passion. – Mm, yeah, he’s just slightly different. And we’re always gonna finish with one that’s a little bit different and really interesting,
it’s called DreamBikes, and they were suggested by Kingpin Ronen. Technically not a bike shop,
but rather five located in Wisconsin, Tennesee, and New York. – Yeah, it’s a non-profit, this one. The idea being that
they take donated biked and then employ underserved
local young people, and so they teach them bike maintenance, they teach them about customer
service, about retail, effectively how to run a bike shop. And when they fix up the donated bikes, they then sell them on to the community. Oh, and they’ve got a mobile repair van and they fix people’s bikes for free. – Oh, it is really cool, isn’t it? Interesting, in all the
bike shops that we’ve mentioned today so far, sell marijuana. They’re not following the footsteps of Floyd Landis and his
new bike shop venture. – No, maybe time will tell, Dan. Can you ride bikes and smoke dope? Probably not I would imagine. – No.
– No, okay, I wouldn’t know. Right, anyway. Thank you, again, for
all your suggestions. We have, of course, picked out just four. We’re not including Floyd
Landis’, that’s not the fifth. But simply because we could not have listed 600 or so suggestions, but we thank you very much
for making them, also. – Now, along with the
hundreds of suggestions of bike shops which we had forming, we inevitably had a couple
of comments which were along the lines of, this show
is brought to you by Wiggle, and therefore you have absolutely no right to give your opinion on local bike shops. And we get the anger directed online, but can we respectfully disagree? – Yeah, I mean, even
just speaking personally, I buy online my bike stuff
and some normal stuff too, and I shop in real shops, both
bike shops and normal shops, and I suspect most of you
are probably similar to me. Price is a consideration,
that definitely affects how and where I shop, but then so
too is the retail experience, so too is choice, and
so too is convenience. – I think inner tubes
are an example of price. I think when you can find them online for 199 with free delivery,
it’s then blubbing hard to justify shelling out eight quid for the same thing to
support your local bike shop. – Yeah, it doesn’t feel like service. – No, but that said,
there are loads of times we walk into a shop buying something and walking straight back out with it. Feels blimming brilliant. – Absolutely, and let’s face it as well, let’s not beat around the bush. Price is definitely not
the only consideration when buying online. There are some really,
really bad online shops, I speak from experience here. I’ve been waiting weeks
for something to turn up, and so hopefully they
eventually will die out, the rubbish ones. – But basically quality
is quality, isn’t it? – Yeah.
– Whether that’s an online store or bricks-and-mortar store, and hopefully that is
what will shine through, and that is what will survive the retail apocalypse, not either or. – Absolutely, I think quality is exactly what will survive the
retail apocalypse, Dan. Right, now, as we said in the beginning, we absolutely love reading
through your comments about your favorite local bike shops and why they’re so great. So do make sure you get involved in this comment section as well, where not only can you leave it, but you can also read other
people’s suggestions as well. And, hey, maybe one day
we will make that video of the top 600 local bike shops– – Wow.
– In the world. – That would be a big thing. Maybe we should do 60 Top 10s instead. – That’s a good idea, yeah. Top 10 Local Bike Shops, Episode 42. (trumpet fanfare) (spring vibrating) – It’s now time for Cycling Shorts. – We’re gonna start our Cycling Shorts with the news that Geraint Thomas is set to race the Giro d’Italia in 2019. – [Dan] Why are you still
going on about this? – Fausto Pinarello. He’s just said that Geraint’s
gonna race the Giro. Just to fill you in if
you’re not up to date with the saga, we we hear
a rumor some time ago that Geraint Thomas was gonna
start the Giro d’Italia. A rumor that he then denied,
but then the Giro organizers said that he was, in fact,
gonna race the Giro d’Italia. – Maybe I denied that rumor as well. – Well, he did, and
then to confuse matters, Chris Froome weighed
it in saying the route to Giro was just totally
perfect for Geraint this year. (Chris exhaling sharply) And then now, here we have it, Fausto Pinarello getting stuck in as well. – [Dan] He’s not going to ride it. I believe Geraint in when he tells us what he’s not going to do. – Well, in all honestly,
whether he does or he doesn’t, out of all the things
I’m looking forward to in cycling this year,
Paris-Roubaix, Tour de France, above everything, whether
or not Geraint lines up at the Giro d’Italia
is literally the thing I’m most intrigued about, I cannot wait. – I must admit, turning into much more of a drama than I was expecting just a few weeks ago.
– Yeah. – I can’t wait either.
– Absolutely, yeah. – Sticking with racing
for a little bit longer, and, in fact, Geraint’s
team, Team Sky, of course, rumors been circulating as
to who the sponsor will be to fill the shoes of Sky from 2020 onward, and whether there’s a
possibility that it could become the first
Colombian World Tour team. – That’s right, because the rumor has it that Dave Brailsford had been meeting with the president of Colombia
and the sports minister, and so whether or not there could be a Colombian title sponsor of that race, of the race, of the team. It kind of seems slightly
odd match at first glance, but then you kind of think, well, why not? Title sponsors are title sponsors. The team is already set up with a load of the best Colombian riders. – [Dan] And how many fans were there at Tour Colombia as well? – Yeah.
– It’s unbelievable. Alright, last bit of racing news now, last week it emerged that
the junior Paris-Roubaix, which threatened in terms of its existence because there was a
budget short for the race of 10,000 euros. That a race that has
been and won in the past by the likes of Geraint Thomas. – Yeah, rumor that he was
actually not gonna ride that year. Anyway, in steps former
winner of the senior event, John Degenkolb, putting up a
quarter of the money himself, launching a Kickstarter
crowdfunding campaign, and, boom, 24 hours
later the race is safe. What a legend! – Absolutely, in fact, that
was at 15,000 euros now. – That’s a big price fund, isn’t it? – I know. – Absolutely, and what
a great thing to do. Right, we’re going to go
back into the real world now, and I’m loving this news
that’s just come out of Melbourne over in Australia. So there, The Age have been reporting that Victoria’s biggest
motoring organization have been calling for improved
cycling infrastructure to go straight to the top of
the transport priorities list. They basically get and understand the fact that more people riding
bikes around the area means better conditions for motorists too ’cause there’s less congestion. – Bring it. – Massive news, absolutely love
it, more like that, please. – Like this? Okay, a picture of a
repurposed underground car park in the Netherlands, complete
with coffee and cake store. Thank you very much to Cycling
Professor for that one. – Exactly like that, yeah,
so closer to home for me, what about this one down in Southampton? So there they have just started work on a Copenhagen style
cycle freeway which is part of a 10 year plan to
improve cycling in the area. – Happy days, right. Science next and King’s
College London have just published a study that
shows that high cadence is of no benefit to recreational cyclists. – Hm, I’m quite pleased about
this one because we have often said here on GCN that
self-selected cadence is often the best route and
that a high cadence is generally more efficient
the higher the power. – That’s right. You would have thought
that actually finding out the balance between force and
cadence wouldn’t be that hard, but hopefully smarter people
than us are working on it now. – Yeah.
– Like Emma. – Yes, maybe Emma’s working on it now. Now over the last couple of
weeks we at GCN have been showcasing our collective
lack of talent for push-ups. And, in particular, Phil Gaimon. – [Phil] Breathe. (Phil breathing heavily) – They were pathetic, weren’t they? Gaimon’s press-ups. Sorry, what I found
particularly interesting was this new piece of research that just come out of Harvard University. So they found that middle-aged men, I think I fall into that bracket. – [Simon] You do, mate, yeah. – [Dan] That can do 40 push-ups– – [Simon] Oh, no, you
don’t fall into that one. – (laughs) No, that is true. Have a significantly reduced chance of getting a cardiovascular
disease outcome than those that can only do 10. That’s after a 10-year follow up. You can’t even do 10, can you?
– No, I can’t. I was really shocked by this, actually. So, apparently, that’s a better predictor of outcome than a aerobic fitness test. I did wonder, though, from
looking at the research whether or not the
group that they’ve based all their research on is
quite homogeneous groups. They’re all firefighters. Now, I know for one I
could not be a firefighter even though I’m relatively
fit because I’m way too puny. (Simon groaning) – [Man] 10, Si. – So maybe, in that instance, they were all bigger, muscly-er blokes. So perhaps there is still hope for skinny cyclists is what I’m saying. – Well, I wonder if you
just clutching at straws than actually–
– Possibly. Be like clutching my arms, mate. (Simon and Dan chuckling) – Yes, this feel like
rather an apt time actually to come along with my weekly vlog. (Simon laughing) Thank you, I think, to
this genius suggestion from Steven Van Impe. – I gotta thank him, definitely, weekly. – So, Neil, hello again. – Hello! – I am now, what, close to
six weeks through my 10 weeks. I’ve got the Half Monty to ride
to kinda check my progress, but before I do it, I wanted to find out what adaptations you
think I have already made, what’s happened to my body
over the last six weeks, which has led to a power
improvement, right? We haven’t tested it yet, but I certainly feel a
bit like, did it start? – Yeah, there’s a few
things that we look at. The initial testing that
you did was full frontal. It gave us an idea of where you were as as a snapshot in the
beginning of January. Since then there have
been a couple workouts that really indicate that you’ve been able to increase your power
production for given durations, like even, especially,
that 20-minute FTP power from some of the rides that you have done. The tests, the assessment
that you’re gonna be doing tomorrow with the Half Monty
is really gonna give us a secondary checkup on that. It is a two-part test. There’s a bit of a ramp in
the beginning that’s gonna kinda ramp you up to the
point where you actually fail. We let you rest and recover a little bit, and then we go into a constrained effort which is gonna then be
constrained by your heart rate. So we wanna keep you
just a little bit below your actual threshold heart
rate for the Half Monty and see what kind of power you produce. – This week’s vlog end’s
gonna be pretty much all about the final day of week six, which I talk to Neal Henderson
about the Half Monty. So two test in one, really, to see roughly where I’m at from a fitness point of view. The first being that
ramp test to exhaustion which I’m really not looking forward to. It’s been years since
I last did a ramp test. I’ve always hated them. A little bit of easy riding
and then half an hour at around 95% of my lactate
threshold heart rate, which for me is going to be in the range of 150 to 155 beats per minute. So now in cogent total and then, I’m not really looking
forward to it, wish me luck. I’m a bit of a funk start
because my TV screen kept turning off, but I’m
now using my laptop instead. And I’m close to the
start of the ramp test. 40 seconds to go, in fact. It starts of reasonably easy. There’s a little ramp test dirt, and then it goes up a
little bit every minute until you can’t do anymore. So hope you enjoy watching
more than I enjoy doing it. Starting off at 128 watts
for the first minute. (mellow electronic music) Next step, 153, still over 200 watts now. So the next step is 255 watt which is what my current FTP is set at. And after that, in theory,
I’ll get anaerobic. And 281, 306, starting
to get a bit harder. 332, 357. (breathing heavily) Not too many more of those, please. I got to the start of the
level that was over 380 watts. That was it, lights out. A bit of recovery now, so I’ve got to do a half hour interval at a bit below threshold,
so for recovery time. You’ll be wanting to know my results, wouldn’t you?
– Yup. – Let’s start with MAP,
Maximal Aerobic Power, what you can sustain
for around five minutes. That was at 309 watts six weeks ago. It’s now up to 326. – So it worked. – Decent rise, but it’s not
as decent as my FTP rise. That was 244 watts when
I started and it’s now, apparently, according to Sir
Neal Henderson, up to 275, which I’m very pleased about.
– Whoa, get you out! That’s pretty much more than what was being predicted for the whole of 10 weeks. You’ve done it in six, 13% improvement. – Yeah, I’m pleased. – You should be pleased, mate. – Whatever night I can get to
300 watts though is another. The way 300 watts feels right now, I don’t think I’m gonna get there another four weeks.
– Well, who knows. With a live audience out in
Mallorca watching you do it, I reckon that’ll provide
the extra impetus. – I wonder if a live
audience is gonna make me start off too hard, just completely– – Probably, aw, this is going
to be great, I can’t wait. (upbeat electronic music) – Next up is our Weekly Inspiration, where you submit your
inspirational cycling photos for a chance at winning one of
three Wiggle voucher amounts. 100 pounds is the top prize. You’ve got vouchers to
spend on whatever you want. 75 pounds for second
and 50 pounds for third. Two ways to submit photos. First, using the uploader, a link to which in the description below, and secondly, using the hashtag #gcninspiration over on Instagram. – It’s definitely a challenge
to win Wiggle vouchers, but for most of it probably
just a chance to sit back and enjoy some amazing photos, isn’t it? – Yeah, well, we love
scrolling through them. – We do.
– There’s so many submitted. – Yeah, right, third place
this week has been won with this quality photo sent in by Anthony Garruba from
Australia, chasing the sunrise. Yes, that’s what I’m talking about. – [Dan] We don’t have to get up that early to chase the sunrise here in– – [Simon] It’s getting earlier, mate! It is– – I’ve got a slight
obsession with daylight hours in the morning.
– 7:23 this morning. Approximately. – Oh, right, well, actually,
quite close to home for me. In second place is Phil
Brown in Lymington, out on a gravel road. – Wow, that does look–
– It’s like the angle is cut short.
– Yeah. Is that snow or is that water? – [Dan] Water. – Wow.
– Lymington’s by the sea. – It’s not a tentacle trail,
but I like the look of it, Dan. Yeah, that is an inspirational
photo, I’d ride there. The winner this week, though,
(drum rolling) well deserving of the 100
pound Wiggle voucher is (cymbals crashing)
James, he sent this one in from Seoul. Commuting in from work, I
decided to head over Namsan, a small mountain in central Seoul. When I reached the first
lookout point I looked left and was like, whoa! That is cool, isn’t it? – [Dan] There’s something
amazing about getting out of a city and looking
down on it, back on it, from a really nice bike ride, isn’t it? – Yeah, I’ve got a spot just outside of my hometown, Bristol. And no matter how hard I try,
I cannot take a decent photo. It does not look like that,
let’s put it that way. It’s a really nice road but
it does not look like that. – No, there’s a point where I was living inside the M25 and one of the best moments of each ride–
– That sounds really weird. Why were you living inside the M25? – Inside the perimeter. But one of the best parts of each ride was going over the M25
when it was gridlocked, and who are these people
stuck in their cars whilst I was out on a nice bike ride. Anyway, we digressed ever so slightly. I know of yet, can we keep submitting your inspirational photos and there’ll be three more prizes next week. – We should probably reassure
all of you that you weren’t in a pipe (chuckles)
underneath the motorway. Dan, you in there? You in there, you in there? – There’s somebody on Thames. – Woo! (electric tool whirring) – Next up is Hack/Bodge of the Week. You can submit your hacks and
bodges using the uploader, the link’s in the description below, or you can use the hashtag– – #gcnhack. – Yes, old fashion social media. – I love a hashtag. – First up this week we’ve
got this from Reuben. Started my smart trainer
journey on Zwift last week. Didn’t have a fan the first three rides and sweat my (whistles) off. I’m still looking for a fan, but thought to use a larger
computer fan turned up to 100% on my fourth ride and
it worked pretty well. – [Simon] Well, I don’t
know about that, Reuben. There’s a lot of very
expensive electronic equipment looking like it’s within sweat distance, as far as I’m concerned. If that was me, that keyboard
would definitely be saturated by the end, probably the screen as well. So do go careful and maybe,
I can’t even see the fan. Must be a teeny one. (blows raspberry) Sounds like a little one. – [Dan] Invest in a proper fan, it will make your indoor training so much better.
– You can buy ’em online, really cheaply, mate. Sorry, it’s a bit raw for some people. Alright, then, next up
we have got this one. I like this very much. Outside the weather was horrific. My wife was out and I
needed to clean my bike, how to achieve this? The kids’ old paddling pool. I’m glad it’s the old paddling pool ’cause that would
definitely trash when that, but still, ingenious. Gotta admire that, I
think a very nice shout to Andy for sending that one in. – [Dan] We had a load
years ago, didn’t we, of people just washing their bikes in their showers or baths. Fair enough if you haven’t
got any outside room to do it so long you clean up after yourself. – Yeah, wouldn’t it be bad to clean up. It would get in the grouting. (groans) Braver men and women than I. Right, then, what’s up next? – We got this from Robert in Shropshire. I used a lay-ge that I
saved to make a wooden plug with one that would fit into the head of my crank on the compression bolt and opposite end that
would attach to the ruler, and this meant that I was able to actually map my saddle height
difference between bikes. Hack or budge? – Hack, I think that’s amazing! I mean, it’s quite nerdy,
but I like it very much ’cause that’s one of those jobs, isn’t it, where you’re like, oh,
is that 775 millimeters or 774 1/2 millimeters? And with that bit of kit, you can definitely work
it out, couldn’t you? – Yeah.
– Genius. – Now I found it sorry I have
no longer been professional, that I’ve not quite so bothered
about exact saddle height. – When you hit 300 watts you will, mate. (Dan laughing) For sure, right, Samuel sent this one in. On a recent ride, I
realized that I can save a whole chuck of money on CeramicSpeed, oversized, jockey wheels. I’m not entirely sure you get
the same performance benefits, but that is quite something. I’ve never seen that one before. – [Dan] Wow, that must have
been a cold old day on the bike. – [Simon] Was the jockey wheel
even turning at that point? – I doubt it.
– It definitely wasn’t. – Saving four watts.
– No way. – Bodge!
(spring vibrating) – Right, next up we got another local one to me in the New Forest, Andrew. Alright, that was the disc brake caliper when it didn’t fan. He said he went bank holiday traffic to take the bike in to my local bike shop. Oh, dear. So I put a trailer on and towed it down to the Forest gravel tracks. – [Simon] So he did go
to his local bike shop. Hey, brilliant! To be fair, I like that trailer very much. That looks like a hack, doesn’t it? – [Dan] Well, there’s
somebody a couple of weeks ago was looking for this exact solution – They were!
– for their child’s bike, so, well, there you go. – Towing a bike with a bike, brilliant. Alright, last one now and
I like this very much. Sent in by Seth Frankel on an old-fashioned social media, Dan. Old chisel smoothed over for super thin disc brake piston tool. Pushes both sides of the
pistons for even pressure. There we go, new life for old tools. This last one was a hashtag
in itself, isn’t it? – Yeah, hack.
– #newlifeforoldtools. Could be applied to any
number of things, couldn’t it? Anyway, make sure you keep them coming. We love your hacks and bodges. (upbeat electronic music) – It’s now your chance to win
a GCN CamelBak water bottle with our caption competition. Last week’s photo, this one
of a pair of KATUSHA riders. We have got absolutely
brilliant captioning as a winner this week. – Ah, go and, hey, can
I read this one out? – Go on it.
– This is sent in by Al Lee. Caption, you distract
Sagan, Alpecin his Bidon. – (laughing) Very good, Al Lee. Get in touch on Facebook with your address and we’ll get that straight out to you. Never has there been a
more deserving winner. – No, absolutely not. Do we need to explain? Alpecin, team sponsor, makers of shampoo. – You probably didn’t need to explain, but thanks for doing that. – Just to clarify my answers. Nothing like ruining a
joke by over-explaining. – This week, but that’s not really a joke for you saying it, really. (Simon laughing) This week, the photo’s this
one of Chris Froome over at the Tour Colombia
with a security guard. – [Simon] He could’ve made
a better said than this one. – See, this is the security
guard just to explain this joke. Geraint said he still
doesn’t want to do the Giro. Did you get it? Anyway, if you can do better than that, leave your captions in the
comments section down below and hopefully we’ll get
another genius response. (upbeat electronic music) We’re about to tell you what’s coming up in the channel over the next seven days, but as per usual, we’re
gonna pick out a few of our favorite comments
from the previous seven, starting with John Bicycle. I suspect Mark from GTN
would have run it faster. This being the cold
Lem-meh-don Challenge uphill, and you’re probably right. – [Simon] Yeah, we did a
bit of thinking about that, this is a very good point, and actually, he probably could have run it faster. 10Ks, he’s climbing 1,000 meters. At current rate for you
that would have been a close run for him then. – I really doubt I can beat him on runner. – He was too fat when I raced
him, it was blooming close. I mean, literally, it was a
sprint finish down a hill. – It was it?
– Yeah, it was. – I quite remember that, I
didn’t sock across the thing, I would ride bike first as well. – It was, yeah. – Moving on to the next one, mate.
– He’s a fit lad. – This from Geeunit199,
ah, the same video. Steven Jones was a brave and confident man offering to buy all the beers for Dan. He was, yeah, I really
took advantage of it. – Brave/confident/wealthy. He was wealthy, not anymore. Right, underneath the video about how to ride in a paceline, Will Baker said, was this filmed the day after
Ollie did his Everesting? Poor boy looks like he’s
blowing out of his inner tube. Funny you say that, Will. Yes, it was the exact day
after Ollie did his Everesting, and he was indeed suffering
so badly, it was brilliant. – And, finally, this
from I’ve got no idea, but the comment is, where did Tom Last go? – That is a good point, Dan. We have been looking for him far and wide. I’m not entire sure where he is. – [Man] Lasty? Lasty, are you here? – Right, then, coming up
on the channel this week, on Wednesday we got the
dark side of cycling, how to beat your mates
when you’re out on a ride. – Good tips there. – Then on Thursday, Hans
gonna let you know the 10 essential items that you
should have in your saddle bag. And Friday, as ever,
it’s Ask GCN Anything. – Yeah, on Saturday, I have
been fascinated by this one, what is actually the difference
between the entry-levels with setup and the bells
and whistles with setups. So what does it mean
practically, and also, what does it mean actually in
terms of the feel on Swift. That’ll be super interesting. On Sunday, Ollie went to meet the guys from the Who What bike
team that defied the odds effectively to become
the fastest track riders on the planet, basically, haven’t they? Incredible story. – Almost there, anyway, like
the giant killers, aren’t they? And Monday, of course,
the Racing News Show and Tuesday back on the
set for the GCN Show. (upbeat rock music) We shall finish the show as
ever with Extreme Corner. And this week you are going to witness one of the best downhills if
not the best downhiller of all time, Nico Vouilloz. – I thought you were gonna
say you for a minute there. – Yeah, not me. (upbeat rock music) I’ll tell you what, Simon, that guy is incredibly smooth on the bike. I mean, the stuff is so rough and he makes it look like nothing. – I guess that’s probably why he’s won 10 world championships. He’s really blooming good, yeah. Ah, right, crackin’ video, crackin’ video. Right, we got a little bit of
news from our shop, actually. We have a mega offer at the moment. One of these super cool
looking CamelBak eddy bottles is up for grabs for free every
time you buy a GCN Fan Kit. That’s pretty cool, isn’t it? – It is, yes, so head over to the shop, theglobalcyclingnetwork.com, if you’d like to take advantage of that offer. That’s the end of this week’s show. We’ll of course be back
this time next week. If you haven’t watched my
descending video with Vouilloz, find it just down here. – It’s over on EMBN.