3 Step System to INSTANTLY BRING YOUR HEART RATE DOWN While Running

3 Step System to INSTANTLY BRING YOUR HEART RATE DOWN While Running


– Whew. Morning, Trainiacs. That was a 88 minute
run going a little bit over 17 kilometers cruise-y kind of long run. One thing that I’m getting
reminded about a lot as new athletes who don’t have a history in swimming, biking, or running, have a really tough time with is running at a low heart rate and that’s the key to triathlon. It’s not about how fast
you can go at the top. It’s about how fast you
can go while keeping your heart rate really low and everyone when they get into triathlon struggles with that key thing. So what we’re gonna go through is a simple three step process to instantly bring that heart rate down so that you can run faster with it feeling easier, avoid injury, and enjoy this a lot more. (upbeat music) – Whoo. Traniacs, we are back in the pain
cave shootin’ videos. It’s nice to have the studio back. All right. So as athletes start
joining teamtrainiac.com or as you just start listening to me talk about zone two training low
heart rate run training, a lot of you might be starting it and going, “Holy smokes! “I cannot bring my heart rate down.” That’s very normal. The combined force of us
pounding on the ground with our body weight results in load of about seven to nine
times our body weight. This is an enormous load
on our body structure to end up keeping it
upright when we’re running. So just naturally our heart
rate shoots through the roof a lot more than when we’re in the pool or when we’re on the bike, but it is critical to do this running. So how do you actually end up doing it? Well, I’m gonna give you three steps to figuring out how to gradually bring your
heart rate down here. First, why is it so important? It’s critical to make ourselves faster if that’s what you wanna do or just get through your race with more of an enjoyment by having
a faster bottom map. It is not done by increasing
your top end of speed it’s by taking that floor
of what a comfortable, easy pace is and bringing that up. Why is that? A few reasons. Number one, our top end
just isn’t sustainable. Our top end is our top
end because it’s how fast we can go for a short period of time. We can’t do it much more
than a few minutes and yes while top end really fast hit workouts do end up helping our overall endurance, it’s not where we’re racing. We don’t race at that fast speed and we have to train like we race. We race even if it’s
a sprint distance race if you like check a Garmin watch or any sort of fitness tracking watch that after a run it says what the load is on your aerobic system, your low end, versus your anerobic system, your top end, it’s usually at least 96 percent aerobic. Not anerobic. Not our top end. So even our fast runs are using that low end zone one two systems. We have to train that and then finally, triathlon is not about
who goes the fastest. It’s not a 100 meter dash. It is about who slows down the least and the way that you do that is by getting your slow pace fast enough so that you can do it in a race and just chug-a-chug out
throughout the 5k, the 10k, the 21.1k, the 42.2k, without slowing down. But you’re still going fast enough that you’re passing lots of people and that is how you’re
successful in triathlon. So let’s get into these three steps of how to start from wherever you are even if you have no history of triathlon, swim, bike,
or run training at all, to being able to run comfortably in whatever distance triathlon you want. Step one is to figure out what your
heart rate’s ceiling is. Personally, I like the Maffetone Method of heart rate ceiling creation and you can get that by going to triathlontaren.com/hrtraining. And what you do is you put in your age and then you answer
some yes or no questions and this starts creating your
custom top end of zone two, but that’s not enough. While it is somewhat accurate at figuring out your top end of zone two, which is your roughly aerobic threshold, they’re not exactly right. There was once a time that I had my heart
rate ceiling calculated with the Maffetone method at around 142 beats per minute. I went into the lab and it was actually calculated at 137 beats per minute. The consequence of this
could actually be very huge. What if I had run at 139 beats per minute? You might have said, “Well, Taren that’s just
two beats per minute. Not a big deal,” but those two beats a minute of just dipping over the aerobic threshold is very very taxing on the body. So it leads to over training and that’s So take that calculation from
triathlontaren.com/hrtraining and then err on the side of caution. Run most of your runs well away from that heart rate ceiling. We’re talking five to 10 beats per minute. And you might be saying, “Well, you know, am I gonna get anything faster?” Yes! Running frequently gets you faster and still being in that
aerobic zone even though it’s maybe zone 1 maybe a ways away from
the top of your zone two. You’re frequently hitting
that aerobic fitness and it’s still going to have the effect of building your endurance
and building your fitness, whereas if you were
even just two beats over that aerobic threshold because you decided to ride the lightning a little bit. Well, you are going to
lead to over training. So you’ve got your heart rate ceiling. What do you do next? Step two is to run a lot. Now back before 2018, I was only running twice a week. I had some internal issues that were making running
really uncomfortable for me during the run and for
a couple of days after. So I ran the minimum amount which was about two runs per week. And this got me through some races and I did some okay runs because I knew which those two runs were supposed to be. But it wasn’t really enough
to make a huge difference in my run performance. The reason for that is
that not all running is created equal. In 2019, I went into a lab and I did some run testing and I found out from my coach, Dr. Dan Plews, that my efficiency was so bad that at a five minute per kilometer pace, which is fairly pedestrian
it’s not too hard, I was working as hard as Dan Plews, pro athlete one of the greatest
triathletes of all time probably like top 30-ish. His comparable pace was faster than a three minute kilometer. He was going like all out so I was burning through a ton of energy. Now some run coaches
might lead you to believe that just with changing
your form and altering this or that you’re going to
become a more efficient runner, but what is actually
shown to be the case is that you will develop your
best, most efficient stride just by running frequently. And that even means if you’re running four or five times a week and
only one of those runs are long and the rest are 10 to 20 minutes that running frequency is
going to allow your body to figure out how to run more efficiently. So what’s gonna happen is
you are going to be able to use less energy to run
which is naturally going to bring your heart rate down because you’re not working so hard. But that’s only if you’re
really really focused on improving your run. If you’re just looking
to finish two runs a week and the right two runs a week probably enough. So let’s say you know
what heart rate to run at. You’ve decided how much
you’re going to run. Well, how do you actually start bringing your heart rate down? That’s step three and that’s where the art of understanding how to essentially not lose your mind with this low heart rate training comes in. And there are some tricks that I recommend that allow you to run more easily, more frequently, without just slowing down to a shuffle and feeling like you’re
not doing anything. For starters on your low heart rate runs, your heart rate ceiling is
your heart rate ceiling. You are going to run under
that no matter what it takes. This means if you’re
running into the wind, if you’re running up hill, if you’re running in heat, if you’re running on a treadmill where there isn’t a
lot of air circulation, if you’re running after travel, if you’re running a little bit sick, if you’re running a little bit tired, if you’re running a little bit fatigued because training is at a high level your heart rate ceiling is
your heart rate ceiling. So you’re gonna have
to sometimes run slow, but here’s how you can
make that less monotonous. First, you can run early in
the morning when it’s cold. Being cool will bring your heart rate down allowing you to run a little bit easier. Number two, you can go on hills or hikes where going slow is fun. If you’re on a trail, if you’re on a hill, and you end up walking but your heart rate is still nice and high right
around where you want to be. That’s okay. That’s good training. That’s time on your feet. That is zone two training time your body doesn’t know pace. Your body know the physiology of how hard we’re working by our heart rate. So I find trails and hikes immensely fun and you don’t have to worry about, “Oh, well, I’m only walking down the sidewalk.” No, you’re walking on hills and trails or you’re shuffling on hills and trails. Still plenty of fun and a great workout. In addition to that, you have the added benefit
of it being essentially a strength focused workout. Strength training for running. Next, a trick that I like to use that I actually used
in 2019 Challenge Roth is when my heart rate started creeping up, I started to get control of my breathing. And one thing that I did was deep (inhaling and exhaling heavily) and controlled belly breaths. Breathing up here (panting) short and shallow shoots your heart rate up. But having a deep (inhaling and exhaling heavily) controlled belly breath
can bring your heart rate down by in my experience as
much as 10 beats per minute. So having control of that
controlled deep belly breath can bring your heart rate down
allowing you to still run. Next, run at your personal
smoothest cadence. There’s a lot of talk of
your cadence being high like 180, 185, your steps per minute
being pushed right up there and that’s gonna be your
way to being most efficient. In my opinion, once you get over 165 steps
per minute you’re okay. If you want to improve your cadence do that in the speed workouts, do that in the workouts
where you have no problem having a higher heart rate because it’s more of a
speed focused workout work on that fast turn over and that will help your
normal everyday cadence of the low heart rate just
gradually come up on its own. Next, you can run more frequently but shorter to avoid cardiac drift. Your heart rate in the course of a run will gradually increase over the course of 60 to 90 minutes even at the same pace. So by the end of a 60 to 90 minute run, your heart rate will be quite high making it very difficult to
keep your heart rate low. So like I said, instead you can run
frequently throughout the week for shorter bursts so that your heart rate only has a smaller amount to climb. Double bonus. Next, if you are doing one
of those long endurance days where you have no choice but
to let cardiac drift happen because you’re doing a long run and you have to be on your
feet for a long period of time you can make those endurance
runs a progression run. Where you gradually increase your speed so that at the end of the run
it’s almost like a tempo pace. So this is a long tempo
run and by that time your cardiac drift does matter
because you’re running long. Be careful with this
because that’s all part of a proper triathlon training program. Finally, be patient. I talked about this one
day on my Instagram channel and I said wait three to six
months for this to happen. And I had some comments
from people saying, “Three months? “Are you kidding me? “I can’t wait that long.” Look, if three months is
not a quick enough time for you to see progress, you’re in the wrong sport. People end up swimming
for years to maybe get a second faster in a time trial. Bike strength. You talk about old men
bike strength out there in hills and the wind. That’s because those old
men have ridden for decades. Running is the same. Expect it to take a long time. Anything that is done really fast and showing you very quick
improvement in triathlon is likely setting you up for
illness, injury, over training. It’s not sustainable and it is not the way to train in such a way that you’re
risking your livelihood, your health, for a quick fix. Quick fixes don’t exist. Like I said, the start of how you figure this out is by figuring out your heart rate and you can get that done at
triathlontaren.com/hrtraining and in that I talk about how to balance your long runs versus your hard runs. How, spoiler alert, you actually shouldn’t
really use heart rate for the high intensity
stuff and why that is. And that’s all free you just go to triathlontaren.com/hrtraining, you put in your e-mail address, you get it for free. And if you are a new triathlete and you aren’t yet subscribed and you need help getting to your race, figuring out how to create
a triathlon training plan, we create videos here weekly. Hit the subscribe button below. Later, Trainiacs.