25kph Is Not Too Slow | E Bike Restriction On The Trail

25kph Is Not Too Slow | E Bike Restriction On The Trail


– Most of the discontent
on restricted E-bikes is just how difficult it is to pedal past that 25 kilometer an hour zone. And that is actually true on gently dipping off flat sections. As you can see, I’m now on a tarmac road and I’m nudging in between 24 and 26. And yes, it can be difficult. But then again, this is a tarmac road. What happens when you go off-road? So today then we’re going to show why 25 kilometers an hour isn’t too slow. (jazz music) Now first of all, I want to point out there are differences between motors. Some like the Brose and Shimano allow you to pedal past that
25K zone almost seamlessly. Whereas others like the current Bosch, although it is rumored there’s
a new motor on the way, means that when you go to
25K, you almost hit a wall. So, not only are you
stripped of assistance but, because of the inherent resistance you also have that drag
to deal with as well. (jazz music) But look, you would probably be hitting that 25K restriction on the flat so, maybe just back down a touch. I mean, what is the rush? Or, if you’re going to
be riding on the road, why not buy a road bike or a gravel bike or maybe move to a country
where there’s a 30K restriction? I guess that’s a little bit too extreme. But what happens then when you move from a road situation to
an off-road situation? Because this is, after
all, mountain biking. Now as you can see I’m
on a gentle gradient and I’m pedaling about 20Ks and hour so, it will take a lot more effort to maintain 25 kilometers an hour but of course, I am in eco mode. And a lot of you have been saying, well why aren’t you in turbo mode? Well indeed, I could do that but, that’s a typical transition stage and I’m doing as much as I can to conserve my watt hours on my battery because, I want to save that
battery for the tough stages. That’s where you’re going
to be using turbo mode. So, I could probably sustain 25Ks on that, but can your battery? (jazz music) No, I don’t think so. Your battery certainly won’t handle you riding turbo all day. But let’s change it up. Let’s actually move to a steeper gradient and let’s actually take it to tarmac. Now I’m actually doing 20Ks an hour and I think even on tarmac,
that’s probably enough. But as you’ll find out,
there are many other things that effect what happens
around the 25K restriction such as tire pressure, tire
choice and rider weight. Now common sense will tell you that a lighter rider is going to get uphill quicker then a heavier rider. And the same rules still apply to E-bikes. Now roadies, they obsesses with things such as power to weight ratio and FTP, functional threshold
power, but mountain bikers well, we worry more about things like terrain and battery conservation. So the bottom line is, I you want to go uphill faster, you
simply need to lose weight. (upbeat music) The road conditions we used at
the beginning of this video, we used because it seems that’s where a lot of the unhappiness stems from with the 25K restriction
and you can see why. Flat easy fast rolling surfaces, it’s easy to get to those
speeds in places such as that. However, what happens when we
move to different surfaces, different trails and different gradients? (upbeat music) ♪ Movers in motion ♪ Here we are, this is now a typical mountain bike single track. The surface is a little bit more earthy. There’s a little bit more root. There’s a little bit more rock. So, the speeds are going
to be definitely slower but again, it’s going to be a lot more interesting place to ride. (upbeat music) So I think you’ll agree,
that’s the type of trail that mountain bikers love to ride. It’s engaging, there’s corners, there’s lots of obstacles to deal with and I was doing about
20, 22 kilometers an hour on that little track there. So, what’s all the fuss about? Huh, so what happens then if the surface stays the same but the trail steepens? So ahead of me is a really nice bit of single track,
slightly more gradient. I’m in trail mode. Let’s go and see how much I can get up to. Okay, 13, 18, 19, 20Ks. I’m not sure I can sustain that all the way up this climb. So some of you are going to say,
yeah, well what about boost? Well, I’m actually going
to stick it in boost and try that trail again. Okay, 18, up to * quicker. 20, 21, 22, 23. Yeah, that’s about it. The argument then must surely stop there. I mean, that’s a pretty straightforward piece of single track and yes, in boost mode I was getting
to 23, 24 kilometers an hour, but in eco and trail, nowhere near. Now I have seen how de-restricted E-bikes get up fire roads quicker,
but I’ve also seen how my daughter at 50 kilos
gets up trails quick as well. And what I’d say to you is,
what’s all the rush about? Now we’re going to move
on now to something a little bit more technical,
a little bit more involved and I’m going to stick it into boost mode and I’m going to give it everything. It’s still quite a smooth surface but the gradient is pretty steep. So, here we go, boost mode up a bank. Okay, 14, 15, now I’m down to 13, 10, nine, 10 kilometers an hour, nine kilometers an hour, ah. That’s about it.
(upbeat music) Ooh, surely that’s the end
of the conversation, right? Now this is what we
like, a nice bit of dirt and remember, surfaces such as that are going to roll a lot slower then those smooth tarmac roads
that we were on earlier. There’s going to be other things as well such as your components,
your tires as well. So, soft compound tires,
they’re going to roll slower. Tires with more pressure in
them are going to roll faster. And there’s other things as well to think about such as they
type of bike you’ve got, whether you’ve got a full
suspension bike or a hardtail. Hardtails generally roll
a little bit quicker. And of course there’s the motor. Don’t forget, there’s differences in that restriction between
the different motors, between Yamaha, Brose, Bosch, and Shimano. But you know what, when you come to places such as this, I mean
seriously, what is the rush? Well, those guys aren’t in any rush and maybe neither should you be. So, the question is, is 25
kilometers now too slow? Well, I guess on fire roads
and transitional stages and tarmac roads, yes,
you do have to put in a little bit more of your own efforts but, a lot of motors are now seamless when it goes past the 25Ks. But when it comes to mountain biking with good shapes, good surfaces, good conditions, which
are really engaging, I really don’t think that they are. However, let us know your comments on what you think about 25K or maybe 30K, depending on the country you’re in, in the comments box below. I’m sure there’ll be lots of
discussion on this subject. In the meantime, check out another stance on, is 25K too slow, just down by here. So yeah, don’t forget to
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