2018 Devinci Django Carbon 29 review – Flow Mountain Bike

2018 Devinci Django Carbon 29 review – Flow Mountain Bike


it’s time to talk about The Devinci
Django two-niner, a poutine powered trail bike from East Coast Canada that I’ve
been on board for the last few weeks. So what do I think of it? Well with 120mm
travel out back and 140 up front it’s a bit of an odd mix – it’s a rare to see
such a big travel difference on a trail bike but on this bike it works really
well. If you had a shorter travel fork on it this bike could be too steep. It’s
already got a 68 degree head angle which is pushing towards the steeper side of
things and if you had a shorter fork it just put you too far over the front.
One undoubted highlight of this bike is the stiffness and strength of the frame.
It is stronger than Justin Trudeau’s jawline. We’ve said before that frame
stiffness and geometry will always trump travel and this bike is a perfect
example of that. Because the frame is so stiff you’ve got a little bit more
confidence to put it into some ugly bits of terrain. Even if you run out of travel you
know that it’s still going to hold its line and that’s a really nice thing. The
bike is also an excellent technical climber. Devinci are one of the brands
that have licensed the Dave Weagle designed Split Pivot suspension system and it
gives you really great sensitivity when you’re climbing in those slow speed
situations, so that’s another real highlight of this bike. In some ways
though this bike is a bit of an odd mix; having a 68 degree head angle would tell
you that it’s designed for more towards the cross country end of the trail bike
spectrum, but in fact this bike’s strength really lie in its technical abilities. It
pushes more towards the all-mountain side of riding. Ordinarily it would come
with a set of Maxxis Ardent tyres which we think would be a bad choice for this
bike. The Ardent is a fast roller for sure, and it might help speed this thing
along a little, bit but it’s definitely going to detract from its abilities when things get a little bit ugly. And as we said before, this is where this
bike shines, so stick with some meaty rubber. We’ve gone for a Minion 2.5 up
front combined with an Aggressor out the back. If you buy this bike expecting it
to be a real cross-country weapon you are probably going to be a little bit
disappointed. It doesn’t have the get-up-and-go or the zip of some other
120mm 29ers on the market. For instance if you stack this up against a
Specialized Camber or the Scott Spark both with 120mm travel and two-niner
wheels you’re going to find that it is a little bit lacking.
It just won’t cover ground as quickly as those bikes, but it’ll leave them both
for dead when things start to get lumpy steep and technical.
A great trail bike for someone who’s looking for more technical riding and
isn’t so interested in going fast or trying to cover huge distances on their
weekend loop.