$20 Budget Road Bike Workstand // As Featured on GCN

$20 Budget Road Bike Workstand // As Featured on GCN


Today, we’re going through the process of making yourself a cheap bikestand out of the parts we see here. Today’s parts list is pretty simple. We’ve got a folding metal leg sawhorse from Bunnings. One of these adjustable jobs. We’ve got an old skewer. We’ve got a roadbike front hub. We’ve got some u-clamps, and some screws. That’s all it’s going to take today. The tools to do the job though: drill, measuring tape, steel ruler, a couple of drill bits, and not quite the right saw for the job, but we’ll get it done with that. Let’s get on with the show. So, out of the shop, this is actually pretty close to what we need. But, once these legs are extended and this is flipped over, let me show you what doesn’t fit- is the bike itself. We can’t actually turn the cranks because…. Ignoring my dirty bike (that’s why we’re going to put it up on here and clean it)- you can see that we need to modify the width of the plank as well. Lengthwise for this bike though, we’ll put the bottom bracket near the end. Find out where the front hub should go, so it’s about there, we mark that off. And we’ve now got a position for our front hub. That’s the first measurements done for my giant bike there. So, the front hub will go here. Put a line across here where the front hub’s going to go, which places the bottom bracket right about there. But this is still too wide, and these legs are too far back. So what we’re going to do is modify this to put the legs a little further forward. And we’ll make this back section only 70mm wide so we can turn the pedals while the bike’s mounted up on here. Let’s get stuck into that. So, here’s where our front hub’s going to go. And back here is where the bottom bracket was sitting, but it was too wide. So, what we’re going to do is saw off a bit of that. But first of all, the other problem we had was these legs were too far back for the cranks to actually turn. So, what I’m going to do is use that hole there. We’ll take this one out and put it up here. But, we first need to grab some measurements on that. Let’s go old school. Going old school on those measurements. Going from there to there; there to there, and we put it right about here. That’s all we’ll need. Okay, I did cheat a bit, we’ve got a spanner as well. Or a shifter, depending on where you’re from. That isn’t a bad counter-sync. That will do it. So, they should be fine in there like that. So now, with the legs moved forward, we have enough room to turn the pedals with those cranks. So, as long as that’s back there, we’ve got space to turn the cranks. You can see that here- plenty of room. So, we have enough clearance this way now, but not this way. So, we will trim this off. So, out of the shop, this was 90mm across. We only need 70mm. You can take it off just one side, but let’s do both just to make it look neat. So we’re going to do 10mm either side. There and there. And we’ll go up to about here. 10mm either side. Same on the other. To about, well, nah, we’ll probably only go to about here. But that will give us enough room to turn the pedals. Okay, maybe not the best choice of tool for the job, but it’s the only one I have, so it’s what we’re going to use today. So, around about 10mm either side of that removed. Let’s see if the bike fits on here now and spins the cranks. Bottom bracket sits there. Plenty of room to spin the cranks. Looks good. So, we’ll put the front hub in place now. Now, we think it’s going to go about there. There’s no other science involved here. It’s just simply bolting it on and screwing it down. So, we wanted there. Mark out some dots. So, here we go, front hub on, nice and tight. We’ll put the skewer in here as well for now. So, now with the front skewer in, we’re pretty much done. Let’s check the bike. Okay, front skewer in first. Get that done up. Bottom bracket lined up just fine. There we have it. We are done! A few of the catches with this is if you’re using it with the rear wheel on- occasionally I won’t even bother about the rear wheel, but- if you’re turning the gears with a stand like this, it may go backwards quite easy. Easily fixed by putting a bit of weight here on the front end. Also, bottom bracket types, if you’ve got a bottom bracket with a rear set of caliper breaks underneath it, or my time trial bike which runs a cable there, you may have to put a bit of gaffe tape, or a bit of something there. If you want a bit more stability in the bottom bracket area while you’re working on the bike, you could probably put a bit of Velcro cable underneath here and around your bottom bracket just to really lock that in place. I haven’t worried about that, though. And best of all, it folds up pretty easy as well. Let me show you that. And you’re done. So there we have it, the super cheap bike stand that everybody’s seen in my other videos and have been asking me to cover. There we go. There’s one built from scratch using not much more than about $20 worth of stuff and about 20 minutes of my time. I’ll put links below of the products that I’ve used. And I’m sure they’re the same anywhere worldwide. Alright, thanks for watching. We’ll see you soon.