10 Product Reviews Loosely Related to Mountain Biking

10 Product Reviews Loosely Related to Mountain Biking


Today we’re going to review ten products,
loosely related to mountain biking. Some of them I bought, and some were sent
to me by various companies. Like everyone else I have my biases, but I’ll
do my best to tear all these products apart. Here goes. Let’s start with the Sennheiser MKE2 Microphone. It’s a clown nose sized microphone that
attaches to the waterproof case of a GoPro Hero 4. It has its own circuit board and mini usb
cable. This whole unit is water resistant, and the
clown nose is supposed to suppress wind noise. It looks great for surfing, motorsports, and
skiing, but I can only speak for how it applies to mountain biking. As many of you may know, most mountain bike
vloggers use the internal mic on the hero4, paired with a stabilizer. The sound from this setup is so good, that
it’s hard to imagine it being any better. To use the MKE2, you’d need to nix the stabilizer
and triple the size of the GoPro with the case and mic. What’s worse, it only works with a Hero4. The Hero5 is out now, and that thing really
does need a mic. So we’ve established that the MKE2 is bulky,
and barely applicable to mountain biking, but how does it perform? To find out I did a little test. First I descended this rock face using a Hero
4 with just the internal mic and no stabilizer. Listen to how that sounds. Next I took the same line with the Sennheiser
mic. Okay, so it sounds REALLY good, almost perfect. My friend Jordan actually wears one on his
full face helmet and syncs the sound with his chest cam, but most people wouldn’t
be willing to go through all that trouble or pay $200 for this. As it applies to mountain bike vlogging, I
don’t think the MKE2 is worth the trouble. It could be great, but it would need to be
smaller and work for the Hero5. On to the MRP Ramp Control Cartridge. This thing replaces the top cap on your Fox
or Rockshox suspension fork, and allows you to control the air volume, or ramp up. Here, we have a fork without any ramp up. It just squishes down with the same firmness
the whole way. Add ramp up, and it gets more progressive. The MRP Ramp control Cartridge does this with
the turn of a knob, which is a game changer. Without this, you need to let all the air
out and wrench off this top cap, which you stick these tokens on to. That’s a pain. Having this knob allows you to actually adjust
your ramp up on the trail, giving you the perfect ride from minute to minute. At a bike park you would want way more progression
to keep from bottoming out. On a windy backwoods trail you’ll want linear
travel for a cushy ride. The MRP Ramp Control Cartridge is relatively
easy to install, and totally worthwhile, but it ain’t cheap. If you would benefit from this it’s worth
the money. If not, you can still use tokens for just
a few bucks. If you want to get a better understanding
of air volume, click the link at the end of the video for my tutorial on suspension fork
settings. Next is the Kali Protectives Interceptor Enduro
helmet. In my last video I reviewed the Smith Rover,
which is a $120 helmet that I like very much. The Kali Interceptor is $180, and inferior
to the Rover in some ways. In fact, the Rover has a nicer finish, a sturdier
visor, and straps that lay flatter on your face. So, why would you get the Interceptor. Well I can only speak for how it feels on
my head, where it fits better than anything I’ve ever tried. It stays perfectly in place with barely any
pressure on the straps. The deal sealer is this solid mount, which
can be used for a light or action camera. It’s also supposed to be really good at
protecting your head. So I like the Interceptor enough to make it
my primary helmet, but I wouldn’t want to pay full retail for it. There are just too many other options. Let’s take a look at another Kali Product,
the Venture gloves. Let me start by saying that these gloves breathe
well—almost too well. The sides of the fingers are made from this
light but durable fabric which lets air through. The rest of the gloves are armored in all
the right places, to protect your fingers while bushwhacking. I think they’re well worth $40, but they’re
only good for the summer or warm climates. I’ll need to get something heavier for the
winter months. Let’s move on to another video product,
the Hero5 Session. This has become my main 4k helmet cam. The video and sound quality are adequate,
and the form factor is second to none. The battery life is enough for one long ride
if managed properly. I also love how easy it is to remove from
its housing for 3rd person shots. There are very few things I don’t like about
the Hero5 session, but for most people it may be overshadowed by the Hero5 Black. For an extra $100 you get a screen and noticeably
better video quality. So, I think the Session makes a good auxiliary
camera for enthusiasts and professionals. If you’re looking for one do everything
action camera, go for the Hero5 Black or the Hero4 Silver. That’s my two cents. While we’re talking about GoPro, let’s
take a look at the Karma Grip which I’m still trying to fit into my equipment rotation. It’s a stabilizer made by Gopro, which you
can use handheld or with this $100 extension cable. I use this overpriced cable to mount the stabilizer
to my chest and stick the handle in my pocket. It’s really bulky, but the stabilization
is exceptional. This is why Phil Kmetz uses it, and he shreds
really hard. Still, Phil syncs his sound from a helmet
cam. Paired with the Hero5, the Karma sounds like
total trash. At best it sounds muffled. At worst you can hear the motors. To get a Karma, the cable, and a Hero5, you’ll
be out $800. You could pick up an Evo and a Hero4 for under
6 for near identical video, far superior sound, and way less bulk. So unless you’ve learned to tame this thing
like Phil has, I’d wait for the next version or pick it up when it goes on sale. The next three product are from a British
company called 76 projects. They make some interesting stuff. The first product is the Piggy, a bracket
that repositions your water bottle cage to allow for storage. This is great because dropper posts have made
saddle pouches a thing of the past. With Jersey pockets only providing limited
space, it’s nice to have some storage on your bike for a tool, some food, your car
keys, and other stuff. You could actually strap just about anything,
or even a mini tripod like I did. For many riders the Piggy will be of no benefit,
but some of you are looking for something like this. I’ll be using this on my hardtail during
solo rides, free as a bird with no pack. The next product is the cable bobbin. This is a marble sized clip that lets you
secure your cables. The Bobbin adapts to whatever angle they cross
at. The thing about these bobbins is that they’re
only marginally better than zip ties, while being many times the size. For that reason nobody will be buying these
out of pragmatism, but rather for fun. They’re sold in different colors, and 76
Projects even implies that they print you a custom color. Because the bobbin is fun and does everything
it promises, I think it’s cool. Just don’t expect it to make your bike faster. On to something that looks like the bobbin,
but does something far different; the cable oiler. This is meant to be put inline with a gear
or brake cable and provide a port to add oil to it. If you went to junior high school you’re
familiar with the concept of capillary action. See how the oil kind of seeps into the port? That’s how the oiler works. Is it necessary or useful? It could be, just maybe not for me. I never have the same gear cable for more
than a few months, so rarely do I need to oil one. I’m also concerned that this port could
actually allow contaminants into an otherwise sealed system. What do you guys think? Have any of you used this product at length? Let me know below. Now on to a product that isn’t related to
mountain biking, but is related to video. I use it often to create content for this
channel. Meet my dash cam, the Anker Roav. Whenever your car is on, the Roav is recording. When it runs out of space, it writes over
the oldest footage, automatically saving any instances where your car hit a bump or went
bananas. If someone messes with your car while it’s
parked, it automatically detects the vibrations and starts recording. You can stick the Roav to your windshield
and plug it into your power port, but I hardwired mine to reduce clutter. This would probably cost you between $50 and
$100 to get done professionally. For a content creator like myself the Roav
is great. If I see something interesting, or crazy,
I can go back and pull the footage. The video quality isn’t great though, and
there’s no way to get rid of this watermark without cropping. The Roav is under $100, extremely reliable,
and super easy to use, so I like it. If it had a flat color profile and the ability
to remove the watermark, I’d love it. So there you go. 10 product reviews in one video. If you found these reviews useful or just
entertaining, give this video a like and subscribe to my channel for content like this every
week. Before you leave a comment asking more about
this stuff remember that google is your friend, and that I left links to everything below. Thanks for riding with me today, and I’ll
see you next time.