1 X Drivetrains, Mixing Components & Worn Bike Parts | GCN Tech Clinic

1 X Drivetrains, Mixing Components & Worn Bike Parts | GCN Tech Clinic


(powerful music) – Welcome back to another
episode of the GCN Tech Clinic where we solve and fix your
bike problems in a virtual way. So if you’ve got one make
sure you leave it for me down there in the comment section below or on all forms of social media using the hashtag #ASKGCNTECH. Right let’s crack on as ever with the first question this week and it comes in from Vishwa Dev whose converted their time
trial bike to a 1x drivetrain using a narrow wide chainring. Now, Vishwa says that they
have a rubbing kind of noise when the chain is on the last three cogs, so the 11, the 12 and the 13. But it becomes really smooth and silent when the chain in is between the fifth and the eight sprockets. “Any reason why this is happening? “Should I be concerned about anything “or is it just the sound of
possible slight cross chaining?” Right, okay, could well be Vishwa because you’re using a
narrow wide chainring. Obviously you do have
some wider teeth on there which means that the chain doesn’t have the option or ability to move just a fraction of a millimeter so the chain can just flex slightly and get a better running chainline which you’ve already mentioned. So if you’re really keen to
still use quite a big gear so 54, 11, 12 or 13 is pretty big, consider getting an even bigger chainring and then you can still use the sprockets in the fifth to eighth positions so you get that perfectly
straight chainline. Something else to consider, you may well be able to get some spaces on the actual spider and
push the chainring out or inwards slightly so you get
a better running chainline. But that’s quite drastic
and it could well affect the actual drivetrain
performance there too in terms of power efficiency. But I reckon it’s probably
because of the narrow wide chainring you’re just
getting increased friction like you’ve already said. Okay next up is Henry Kennaway who says, “Love the show I
have an 11-speed Campagnolo “Potenza groupset and I would
like to install Campagnolo “Chorus carbon shifters
for the added ability “to shift down more than
one sprocket per shift. “Would these components be compatible?” Henry, good to hear from you. I’ve not actually tried this myself so I can’t give you a real life example but the official line from
Campagnolo is that it won’t. They do actually list
that on the help section of their own website. The reason being I imagine
it’s something to do with the actual spring return mechanism inside of the rear derailleur and it’s just not compatible
with the power shift function within the Ergopower levers. Now the reason your shifters don’t actually allow that
shifting mode that you desire is because the shift hood style replicates more the EPS shape rather than the traditional Ergopower one. So it’s probably slightly
more comfortable in my opinion anyway from using the two different types and the actual shape
and way it’s been molded just doesn’t allow the
ratchets to work in such a way. So I’m afraid, if you
want those extra shifts you are gonna have to change
the rear derailleur as well. Okay Joe Pavlik is next
or TheJoePavlik even, “Speaking of jockey wheels, “when do you know it is time
to replace them and how?” Right then Joe. Well firstly if the teeth
on them are really sharp and look like shark’s teeth then it’s definitely time to replace them. Also if the bearings or bushes
within them are really stiff so the easiest way of finding that out is to try and take the chain
away from them slightly and try and turn them. If they’re really difficult to turn they definitely need replacing. Bushes you can revitalize and
get them running good again if they’re the ones with sealed
bearings though to be honest it’s not worth the hassle or
the time to actually bother trying to revitalize them because they’re relatively low cost and well are consumable I guess. Now, do consider though,
if they are moving around the upper pulley wheel
on virtually all systems is designed to have a
little bit of float there. ‘Cause that takes up any
differences and tolerances in indexing so between
the actual chainline and the indexing of the rear derailleur. The bottom one though, generally they are in a fixed position and don’t have very much flex at all. But if they’re really
really flexy and sloppy definitely replace them and if the teeth are
jagged like shark teeth replace them too. Right next up is Jose Mangini who says, “Can I use Campagnolo wheels and cassette “with the remaining parts being Shimano, “everything 11-speed? “I used this combination
20 years ago with 9-speed “and they worked fine. “If not any suggestion on how to make “Italians and Japanese
speak the same language? “Thanks and keep up the wonderful job.” Jose, yes. All 11-speed cassettes work fine across all 11-speed
groupsets from my experience. It’s not 110% perfect but
well it’s 100% perfect. I’ve never had any problems there so it’s gonna be totally fine. Yet the manufacturers
will say it won’t work but it will. Now the reason being, the actual sprocket spacings,
Shimano and SRAM is identical and the difference in distance between Shimano and Campagnolo
or SRAM and Campagnolo is just 0.1 of a millimeter. Pretty minute. And the actual thickness of the sprockets is the same across all so it’s gonna work absolutely fine. Italians and Japanese they
speak the same language for what you need to do. Okay next up Kevin Aguilar who says, “Great content as always.” You’re welcome. “How do you plug the
holes in a carbon frame “where mechanical groupset cables enter “when you switch to Di2?” Right Kevin, a few options here. Easiest one, get some electrical
tape and just go over them. Not that elegant though. Alternatively, contact
the frame manufacturer and ask them for some
rubber bungs to go in there they normally have some specialist ones. Also Shimano, they’ve
get a Di2 grommets set that you could pop in there. Something a bit more well
hack or bodge if you like is to get some soux grouse that’s like a moldable type material you put in there and
that will block it off, you can smooth it off nicely. Or alternatively some silicone sealant so the sort of thing you
might use in a bathroom or a kitchen, around
a sink or some windows that kind of thing. You can put a dab of that in
there and smooth it off nicely and it’s easy to pick out if
you ever go back to mechanical but I don’t reckon you will. Right next up rr8299, that is a very weird name. I would like to see your birth certificate actually I would send it in. Right anyway, rr8299 says, “When I’m not pedaling the
chain suddenly taps the frame “and even falls of the big chainring. “If I pedal backwards
it falls off for sure. “It’s as though it gets caught
or stuck in the cassette. “Di2 Ultegra on a giant advanced Defy.” Right then rr8299 this seems to me like your
freehub body is jammed up. So the actual pulls or the
ratchets within the freehub body and where it joins onto the hub shell, they’ve got too much grease
in there or for some reason the little springs or
clips they’re not releasing and it’s making your bike well
almost like a fixed wheel. So as you’re trying to
freewheel it’s not allowing it and therefore it’s trying
to kick you forward and that’s what the slamming is, likewise when you’re trying
to pedal it backwards, it’s not doing so and it’s just dislodging from the chainring. So if you’re a competent mechanic, take apart the freehub, clean
up all the grease and the gunk inside of it, take out
the pulls and the springs, make sure they’re sparkling and then apply a very small amount of
quite thin grease in there before reassembling and it will be okay. Otherwise take it down to your local shop and tell them that’s what
Jonny Tech has recommended. Right next one is Gem Lacson who says, “Hi Jon, is there a way to
have a 10 tooth sprocket “on the current 11-speed groupsets?” No, not that I know of. I know years ago there
was a 10 tooth sprocket or even a 9 tooth perhaps that threaded into where your lock ring would go and acted as both a lock
ring as well as a sprocket. I think it was for downhill
mountain bikes or something but then you had to change the axle and do all sorts of jiggery-pokery likewise I think Moulton,
the fold-up bikes that are pretty bling
from Bradford on Avon not that far away from here, they also had a 9 tooth sprocket as well but that was a specialist bit of kit. And Shimano, pretty sure
they’ve got a groupset or they certainly did called
Capreo or something like that that was designed for fold-up bikes. And the freehub body was normal width but sort of the last third
of it was really really small so you could put the
smallest sprocket on there. Of course you’ve got smaller sized wheels so having a smaller sprocket means you can get a bigger amount of
wheel revolutions per turn of the crank and everything. But yeah, what you’re
searching for isn’t available to my knowledge. I’m sure someone out there has
probably hacked or bodged one but certainly as an
after-market component, no it’s not possible. Final one, Tim Hughes, now Tim says, “I have a question, is it possible “to attach a front derailleur to a frame “that previously did not have one? “I’ve seen band on adapters
is that all I would need? “I’m in the process of
attempting to convert “a cheap Chinese bicycle
into a modern day road bike “with a 105 groupset.” Tim, yes sir. A front band on adapter
is all you need really to actually put that front derailleur on. What you need to consider though is that you’ve got a adequate
frame to actually allow the routing of a front
derailleur cable there too. Now if you’ve got a
under-the-bottom bracket shell cable guide then make
sure its got two slots basically for your cables. If not you can probably buy
one that would bolt on there or screw in there absolutely
fine you’d be able to use that but you do need to make sure obviously you’ve got a cable stop
at the front of the bike to allow the outer cable to stop in order to get tension on
the front derailleur cable running backwards. Likewise if you don’t have a
cable guide underneath there, then maybe you’ve got one on the seat tube like a cyclo-cross bike or
old school mountain bike and you can run it into there and do some magic with that too. But the other thing you need to consider, you need to have a cable stop in order to allow the
cable to have some tension before fitting that front derailleur. But I’m interested to see this, I do like sort of a
cheap bicycle conversions so make sure you send some
pictures of that in to me. Right, there we are. I hope I’ve been able
to help answer and solve your bike problem. If not make sure you leave it down there in the comment section below
or on all forms of social media using that hashtag #ASKGCNTECH. Right, remember to like
and share these videos with your buddies and friends out there. And also why not check out the GCN shop at shop.globalcyclingnetwork.com. Now for two more great
videos how about clicking just down here and just down here.